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Old 04-12-2012, 07:03 AM   #1 (permalink)
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Connecticut votes to abolish the death penalty

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-us-c...16#TWEET125302

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Legislators in the US state of Connecticut have voted to repeal the death penalty for all future cases, after a 10-hour floor debate.

Democratic Governor Dannel Malloy says he will sign the bill, making his state the 17th to end capital punishment.

As expected, state lawmakers voted 86 to 62 for the bill on Wednesday.

Two men sentenced to death in a recent grisly murder case - and the nine others on Connecticut's death row - will not have their sentences commuted.

Joshua Komisarjevsky and Stephen Hayes were convicted of the murder of Jennifer Hawke-Petit and her two daughters inside their Cheshire home in 2007.

Komisarjevsky and Hayes still have appeal rights, and it will probably be years before they are executed.

The murders shocked the US and helped defeat a previous bill to abolish the death penalty in Connecticut.

Dr William Petit, the only survivor of the home invasion attacks, fought to oppose the repeal.

But keeping Komisarjevsky and Hayes on death row created further support for the bill.

"For decades, we have not had a workable death penalty,'' Mr Malloy said in a statement.

"Going forward, we will have a system that allows us to put these people away for life, in living conditions none of us would want to experience."

Connecticut has only carried out one execution in 51 years, in 2005.

For all future cases, the highest penalty will be life imprisonment without parole. New Mexico passed a similar ban in 2009 and did not reduce the sentences of those previously sent to death row.

One legislator said the bill's limit to future crimes did not make sense, calling it a political tool.

"In terms of the bill we're about to vote on, we allow the death penalty to continue for at least 11 people and maybe more," Lawrence Cafero Jr, the Republican House Minority leader said.

Others who opposed the repeal outright described the details of the Petit murders and other cases that had led to a death sentence.

"I'm a man of faith and I won't tell you I haven't wrestled with my faith,'' said Democratic Representative Russ Morin during the debate. "But I'm going to be clear: I'm not torn on this matter, not one bit."

Captial punishment repeal proposals are pending in several other states including Kansas and Kentucky.
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Old 04-12-2012, 07:20 AM   #2 (permalink)
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Foolishness.

Life in solitary is worse than death, but it's just too expensive. Hell, 30-30 rounds are $.40 a piece. I'd buy them the first box.
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Old 04-12-2012, 07:23 AM   #3 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by Camarogenius View Post
Foolishness.

Life in solitary is worse than death, but it's just too expensive. Hell, 30-30 rounds are $.40 a piece. I'd buy them the first box.
I love the hypocracy of people who get twisted up over "murdering" some people but have no issue murdering others
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Old 04-12-2012, 07:26 AM   #4 (permalink)
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I love the hypocracy of people who get twisted up over "murdering" some people but have no issue murdering others
Explain? There's a huge difference between murdering unborn children, and executing a convicted murderer.

The same accusation of hypocracy would hold alot more water when used on those people that are pro-abortion and anti-death penalty.
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Old 04-12-2012, 07:26 AM   #5 (permalink)
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Foolishness.

Life in solitary is worse than death, but it's just too expensive. Hell, 30-30 rounds are $.40 a piece. I'd buy them the first box.

You really are that stupid aren't you? Sending people through multiple appeals trials is A LOT more expesnive than keeping then locked up for their lifetime.
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Old 04-12-2012, 07:27 AM   #6 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by Camarogenius View Post
Explain? There's a huge difference between murdering unborn children, and executing a convicted murderer.

The same accusation of hypocracy would hold alot more water when used on those people that are pro-abortion and anti-death penalty.
And just like that a thread hijack to an abortion of an abortion thread
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Old 04-12-2012, 07:28 AM   #7 (permalink)
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You really are that stupid aren't you? Sending people through multiple appeals trials is A LOT more expesnive than keeping then locked up for their lifetime.
So tighten up the rules on what qualifies as grounds for an appeal.
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Old 04-12-2012, 07:29 AM   #8 (permalink)
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And just like that a thread hijack to an abortion of an abortion thread
That's what he intended. Joe threw out the bait, and I took it.

NoJoke will be her in a sec.
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Old 04-12-2012, 07:30 AM   #9 (permalink)
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So tighten up the rules on what qualifies as grounds for an appeal.
So, how do you do that without violating people's rights ? Oh that's it, I forgot that in your world "bad guys" don't have rights.
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Old 04-12-2012, 07:32 AM   #10 (permalink)
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Hell, 30-30 rounds are $.40 a piece. I'd buy them the first box.

Oh yea, and the rounds are $1.20 at the minnimum. Comarotard
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Old 04-12-2012, 07:33 AM   #11 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by SanDiegoCJ View Post
So, how do you do that without violating people's rights ? Oh that's it, I forgot that in your world "bad guys" don't have rights.
Hot dayum! You are dumber than dieselmh.

Show me anywhere where I've said that "bad guys" don't have any rights.
I said tighten up the rules.
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Old 04-12-2012, 07:34 AM   #12 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by Camarogenius View Post
Explain? There's a huge difference between murdering unborn children, and executing a convicted murderer.

The same accusation of hypocracy would hold alot more water when used on those people that are pro-abortion and anti-death penalty.
Quote:
After 18 years of incarceration and countless protestations of innocence, Anthony Graves finally got a nod of approval from the one person who mattered Wednesday and at last returned home — free from charges that he participated in the butchery of a family in Somerville he did not know and free of the possibility that he would have to answer for them with his life.

The district attorney for Washington and Burleson counties, Bill Parham, gave Graves his release. The prosecutor filed a motion to dismiss charges that had sent Graves to Texas' death row for most of his adult life. Graves returned to his mother's home in Brenham no longer the "cold-blooded killer," so characterized by the prosecutor who first tried him, but as another exonerated inmate who even in the joy of redemption will face the daunting prospect of reassembling the pieces of a shattered life.

"He's an innocent man," Parham said, noting that his office investigated the case for five months. "There is nothing that connects Anthony Graves to this crime. I did what I did because that's the right thing to do."

An attorney for Graves, Jimmy Phillips Jr., said his client was released from Burleson County Jail, where he had been awaiting a retrial, at about 5:30 p.m.
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GEORGETOWN, Texas - A Texas grocery store employee who spent nearly 25 years in prison in his wife's beating death walked free Tuesday after DNA tests showed another man was responsible. His attorneys say prosecutors and investigators kept evidence from the defense that would have helped acquit him at trial.

Michael Morton, 57, was convicted on circumstantial evidence and sentenced to life in prison for the August 1986 killing of his wife, Christine. Morton said he left her and the couple's 3-year-old son to head to work early the morning of the slaying, and maintained through the years that an intruder must have killed her.

Prosecutors had claimed Morton killed his wife in a fit of rage after she wouldn't have sex with him following a dinner celebrating his 32nd birthday.

Wearing a simple button-down shirt and a nervous smile, Morton hugged each of his half-dozen defense attorneys, then hugged his parents after District Judge Sid Harle said he was a free man.

CBS affiliate KEYE-TV reports that a load roar was heard in the Williamson County courtroom as Morton was set free by the judge.

"You do have my sympathies," Harle said. "You have my apologies. . . . We do not have a perfect system of justice, but we have the best system of justice in the world."

Addressing reporters moments later, Morton struggled to hold back tears.

"I thank God this wasn't a capital case. That I only had life because it gave these saints here at the Innocence Projects time to do this," he said.

Texas has executed more prisoners than any other state. The New York-based Innocence Project, which helped Morton secure his release, specializes in using DNA testing to overturn wrongful convictions.

This summer, using techniques that weren't available during Morton's 1987 trial, authorities detected Christine Morton's DNA on a bloody bandana discovered near the Morton home soon after her death, along with that of a convicted felon whose name has not been released.

"Colors seem real bright to me now. Women are real good looking," Morton said with a smile. He then headed to a celebratory dinner with his family and lawyers.

The case in Williamson County, north of Austin, will likely raise more questions about the district attorney, John Bradley, a Gov. Rick Perry appointee whose tenure on the Texas Forensic Science Commission was controversial. Bradley criticized the commission's investigation of the case of Cameron Todd Willingham, who was executed in 2004 after being convicted of arson in the deaths of his three children. Some experts have since concluded the forensic science in the case was faulty.

Bradley did not try the original case against Morton. But the Innocence Project has accused him of suppressing evidence that would have helped clear Morton sooner. That evidence — including a transcript of a police interview indicating that Morton's son said the attacker was not his father and that his wife's credit card and personal checks were used after she was killed — was ultimately obtained through a Texas Public Information Act request.

Bradley agreed Morton should be freed after the other man's DNA was tied to a similar slaying in January 1988 — after Morton was already in prison.

Harle signed an agreement Monday recommending that Morton's conviction be overturned. It was passed on to the state Court of Criminal Appeals, which will make the final ruling that could make Morton eligible for state compensation of $80,000 per year he was wrongfully imprisoned — about $2 million total.

Morton is not allowed to leave Texas until the Court of Criminal Appeals rules. Innocence Project co-founder Barry Sheck said that process usually takes at least a month but could take two or three.

Asked if he ever thought he would be released, Morton said, "I prayed for it, and I had faith it would arise."

His lawyers said he couldn't answer more questions about his case because of the pending appeals court decision, and separate court filings charging police and prosecutorial misconduct.

Morton's defense attorney, John Raley, said his client was told a few years ago that if he showed remorse for the crime, he likely would have been paroled.

"I don't know what I would respond after the system had let me down the way it had and I'd been in prison 23, 24 years," Raley said. "But this man told them, `All I have left is my actual innocence. And if I have to spend the rest of my life in prison I'm not giving that up."'

Morton's release could become an issue for Perry, who is vying for the Republican presidential nomination. Perry appointed Bradley to the forensic commission in 2009, but the Texas Senate refused to confirm him after he told reporters Willingham was a "guilty monster."

A report indicating that the science in the Willingham case might have been flawed was submitted to Perry's office as part of the appeals Willingham's lawyers filed before his execution.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cameron_Todd_Willingham

(I realize guy #2 was not on death row)
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Last edited by Joe_W; 04-12-2012 at 07:35 AM.
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Old 04-12-2012, 07:34 AM   #13 (permalink)
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Foolishness.

Life in solitary is worse than death, but it's just too expensive. Hell, 30-30 rounds are $.40 a piece. I'd buy them the first box.
So, let me ask you a straight question.
Do you completely support our federal constitution ?
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Old 04-12-2012, 07:34 AM   #14 (permalink)
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Oh yea, and the rounds are $1.20 at the minnimum. Comarotard
Maybe in the Stinkin' Lincoln, but not in Texas.

I think 30-30's are second only to .22's in rifle popularity in this state.
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Old 04-12-2012, 07:36 AM   #15 (permalink)
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So, let me ask you a straight question.
Do you completely support our federal constitution ?
Yes I do. Now show me where I said what you accused me of saying.

And before you go into your slobbering love fest for the SCOTUS, go and look at what kind of silly shit is used as grounds for appeal.
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Old 04-12-2012, 07:37 AM   #16 (permalink)
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Good... death penalty(DP) doesn't deter crime,costs WAY more than life witn no possibility of parole and while being put to death brings huge suck living out your days behind bars is a worse punishment.
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Old 04-12-2012, 07:39 AM   #17 (permalink)
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Good... death penalty(DP) doesn't deter crime,costs WAY more than life witn no possibility of parole and while being put to death brings huge suck living out your days behind bars is a worse punishment.
Considering Ct has only executed 1 guy in 51 years it's not a big deal really. Hell I lived there and never realized we had the death penalty
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Old 04-12-2012, 07:40 AM   #18 (permalink)
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Why not just issue a statewide letter, "We don't have the balls to punish you the way you ought to be punished, so commit all the heinous crimes you want"
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Old 04-12-2012, 07:44 AM   #19 (permalink)
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Yes I do. Now show me where I said what you accused me of saying.

And before you go into your slobbering love fest for the SCOTUS, go and look at what kind of silly shit is used as grounds for appeal.
If you completely support COTUS you have to support Connecticut's decision to end the death penalty since it's 100% within their rights under COTUS to do so.

IMO you really don't think that "bad guys" have rights. The bulk of your past posts make a lie of your claim that you think they do.
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Old 04-12-2012, 07:45 AM   #20 (permalink)
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If you completely support COTUS you have to support Connecticut's decision to end the death penalty since it's 100% within their rights under COTUS to do so.
I may support their right to do so but I don't have to agree with it. It disgusts me that they have abolished it.
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Old 04-12-2012, 07:46 AM   #21 (permalink)
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I may support their right to do so but I don't have to agree with it. It disgusts me that they have abolished it.
That I can live with, but CamaroTard's response was different than yours.
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Old 04-12-2012, 07:46 AM   #22 (permalink)
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I may support their right to do so but I don't have to agree with it. It disgusts me that they have abolished it.
^ What the short fucker said.
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Old 04-12-2012, 07:52 AM   #23 (permalink)
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And before you go into your slobbering love fest for the SCOTUS, go and look at what kind of silly shit is used as grounds for appeal.
That statement right there makes a mockery of your claim that you believe "bad guys" have rights.
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Old 04-12-2012, 07:56 AM   #24 (permalink)
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As much as it pains me to defend CG, I think he feels like I do. All things considered, most of these death row inmates are animals. They really deserve not much more than a bullet and a hole. My conscience is clear that they must be allowed the Constitutional protections, but that doesn't mean I have have to agree with that either. Jeff just rages against it here.
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Old 04-12-2012, 08:02 AM   #25 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by SanDiegoCJ View Post
If you completely support COTUS you have to support Connecticut's decision to end the death penalty since it's 100% within their rights under COTUS to do so.

IMO you really don't think that "bad guys" have rights. The bulk of your past posts make a lie of your claim that you think they do.
:Gary: using a 10th amendment argument?
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