Whats stronger? a grade 8 bolt or case hardened pin to hold receiver hitch in??? - Pirate4x4.Com : 4x4 and Off-Road Forum
 
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Old 05-01-2009, 09:14 AM   #1 (permalink)
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Whats stronger? a grade 8 bolt or case hardened pin to hold receiver hitch in???

having a discussion with a friend, there is a 5/8" (i think) hole that holds the receiver hitch into the reciever. i was going to use a grade 8 or 10 bolt to hold it in. but he brought up the point, that the "pins" that come with reciever hitches are case hardened and they are stronger than a grade 8 bolt??? i can see that possibly. but im not so sure about it.

anyone that has any concrete proof? whats stronger "i.e. safer" to hold by reciever hitch in, grade 8 or 10 bolt, or the hitch pin?
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That guy can go fuck himself with whatever power tools he has left.
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Old 05-01-2009, 09:17 AM   #2 (permalink)
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The pin will be stronger.

Pins are designed to be loaded in shear, while bolts are designed to be loaded in tension.
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Old 05-01-2009, 09:18 AM   #3 (permalink)
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Old 05-01-2009, 09:18 AM   #4 (permalink)
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the pin. greater minimum diameter.
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Old 05-01-2009, 09:19 AM   #5 (permalink)
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I use a grade 24 bolt. lol...whut?
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Old 05-01-2009, 09:23 AM   #6 (permalink)
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ill just one up you guys and use a grade 48 bolt, ill show you!!!

i can definately see the shear strength vs. tension strength. but damm the pins just look cheap. ill stick with my pin then.
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That guy can go fuck himself with whatever power tools he has left.
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Old 05-01-2009, 09:23 AM   #7 (permalink)
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I use a grade 24 bolt. lol...whut?
You're Canadian eh? We don't use metric shit here AZ boy.
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Old 05-01-2009, 09:23 AM   #8 (permalink)
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The pin will be stronger.

Pins are designed to be loaded in shear, while bolts are designed to be loaded in tension.

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Old 05-01-2009, 09:26 AM   #9 (permalink)
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Yer from Iowa, Id put a corn cob in there when ya get done "making nice" with it.
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Old 05-01-2009, 09:33 AM   #10 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by Schmozilla View Post
The pin will be stronger.

Pins are designed to be loaded in shear, while bolts are designed to be loaded in tension.
I've used both, but I also figured that the odds of a Grade 8 bolt sheering off before my hitch is torn apart is small enough to not worry about it.

Gut feeling odds of course.
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Old 05-01-2009, 09:52 AM   #11 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by dnchevyman View Post
having a discussion with a friend, there is a 5/8" (i think) hole that holds the receiver hitch into the reciever. i was going to use a grade 8 or 10 bolt to hold it in. but he brought up the point, that the "pins" that come with reciever hitches are case hardened and they are stronger than a grade 8 bolt??? i can see that possibly. but im not so sure about it.

anyone that has any concrete proof? whats stronger "i.e. safer" to hold by reciever hitch in, grade 8 or 10 bolt, or the hitch pin?
What are you towing, a trailer full of fat chicks? I've never seen a pin fail in my short life time. Hitches ripped from the frame, snapped chains, broken tow straps (With the cool decapitating hooks), bent tow hooks, yes, but never a broken pin.

Even the sheer strength of a Grade 8 bolt in that diameter is going to be ungodly strong. Unless of course, you are hauling a trailer full of fat chicks. Otherwise, you might want to use both.
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Old 05-01-2009, 10:06 AM   #12 (permalink)
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seen them both in action and have yet to see either fail.
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Old 05-01-2009, 10:11 AM   #13 (permalink)
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i just use a piece of 3/8" zink allthread i bought from home depot and double nut each end.
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Old 05-01-2009, 10:12 AM   #14 (permalink)
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So how come the shear pins in a bushhog shaft are actually bolts?

Unrelated, just always wondered as I have never seen an actual pin in the shear pin holes on the shaft
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Old 05-01-2009, 10:15 AM   #15 (permalink)
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My grandpa once used a head bold for a shear bolt in a brush hog. The PTO shaft twisted instead of the bolt shearing.
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Old 05-01-2009, 10:16 AM   #16 (permalink)
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So how come the shear pins in a bushhog shaft are actually bolts?

Unrelated, just always wondered as I have never seen an actual pin in the shear pin holes on the shaft
Those almost always come with a grade 2 bolt because anything stronger will break the gears before it shears.
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Old 05-01-2009, 10:16 AM   #17 (permalink)
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My grandpa once used a head bold for a shear bolt in a brush hog. The PTO shaft twisted instead of the bolt shearing.
That too.
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Old 05-01-2009, 10:17 AM   #18 (permalink)
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Quote:
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So how come the shear pins in a bushhog shaft are actually bolts?

Unrelated, just always wondered as I have never seen an actual pin in the shear pin holes on the shaft
My Dad's old ass brush hog also had bolts on the PTO shaft also. My only guess is that they are uber weak, Harbor Freight bolts designed to snap at a few thousand PSI less than anything else in the driveline.

Speaking of which, why haven't those driveshaft with those sheer bolts been more popular? It seems like a good idea in point. Bomb proof your driveline and axles, making the d-shaft bolts the only semi-weak source. It is helluva lot faster, easier, and cleaner to replace a few bolts on a driveshaft than blowing a ring and pinion and such.
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Old 05-01-2009, 10:18 AM   #19 (permalink)
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The case hardened pin. The pin is actually like two pins in one. The outer surface is hardened down to a given case depth (100-150 usually on Rockwell B). This gives the pin wear resistance and some strength. The inner portion is not has hard (Rockwell 50-100 usually) this allows the pin to flex and absorb force with out being brittle. Really case hardened pins are the best of both worlds. The bolt is just machined stock, grade 8 bolts are not hardened.
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Old 05-01-2009, 10:37 AM   #20 (permalink)
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Quote:
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The bolt is just machined stock, grade 8 bolts are not hardened.

uhm?

Grade 2 is a standard hardware grade steel. This is the most common grade of steel fastener and is the least expensive. Grade 2 bolts have no head marking (sometimes a manufacturer mark is present).

Grade 5 bolts are case hardened. This means that the outside part of the bolt has been hardened but that the bolt was not heated enough to harden the inside portion. This creates a bolt that is fairly hard but not as brittle as a fully hardened bolt. Grade 5 bolts are the most common bolts found in automotive applications. Grade 5 bolts may have 3 evenly spaced radial lines on the head.

Grade 8 bolts are fully hardened. This means the bolt has been hardened all the way through. This creates a bolt that is very hard but somewhat brittle. Grade 8 bolts are more likely to snap off than bend under extreme loads. Grade 8 bolts are often found in demanding applications such as automotive suspensions. Grade 8 bolts may have 6 evenly spaced radial lines on the head.

they are quenched and tempered
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Old 05-01-2009, 10:43 AM   #21 (permalink)
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uhm?

Grade 2 is a standard hardware grade steel. This is the most common grade of steel fastener and is the least expensive. Grade 2 bolts have no head marking (sometimes a manufacturer mark is present).

Grade 5 bolts are case hardened. This means that the outside part of the bolt has been hardened but that the bolt was not heated enough to harden the inside portion. This creates a bolt that is fairly hard but not as brittle as a fully hardened bolt. Grade 5 bolts are the most common bolts found in automotive applications. Grade 5 bolts may have 3 evenly spaced radial lines on the head.

Grade 8 bolts are fully hardened. This means the bolt has been hardened all the way through. This creates a bolt that is very hard but somewhat brittle. Grade 8 bolts are more likely to snap off than bend under extreme loads. Grade 8 bolts are often found in demanding applications such as automotive suspensions. Grade 8 bolts may have 6 evenly spaced radial lines on the head.

they are quenched and tempered
I guess I could have worded that better. I meant that grade 8 are not case hardened. Case hardened tolerates repetitive stresses better then a through hardened pin.
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Old 05-01-2009, 10:55 AM   #22 (permalink)
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I use a grade 24 bolt. lol...whut?
I use wooden dowels from HD. They are much cheaper
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Old 05-01-2009, 10:57 AM   #23 (permalink)
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I don't doubt the strength of the bolt, but being the design the pin is the way to go.

Ultimate strength of the bolt is achieved when it's torqued properly, being the large slip fit of the ball mount in the hitch you're not going to be able to achieve that without deforming the reciever tube.

This all besides the point that the pin makes it really easy to pull the ball mount out to swap or just remove it to keep the ball and grease out of the weather when you're not using it.
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Old 05-01-2009, 01:02 PM   #24 (permalink)
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Old 05-01-2009, 01:56 PM   #25 (permalink)
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I think the pins are just for show.. Let the hitch rust into the inside of the receiver, and it'll never come out.
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