What is the Ideal coilover angle in the back? - Pirate4x4.Com : 4x4 and Off-Road Forum
 
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Old 06-18-2011, 06:57 PM   #1 (permalink)
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What is the Ideal coilover angle in the back?

I see so many builds with so many different set ups. Seams to me the coilovers in the rear would be best and have more room in the range of motion if they are vertical, staight up. This means I would have to cut into the TJ tub well for the hoop. Most people angle the top rearward and do not need to cut the tub. Is that why they do that or is angled actually better?
I just back halfed the frame and it is now moved inboard and the coilovers will be the next step so looking for input.

thanks,
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Old 06-21-2011, 06:18 PM   #2 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by csdilligaf View Post
I see so many builds with so many different set ups. Seams to me the coilovers in the rear would be best and have more room in the range of motion if they are vertical, staight up. This means I would have to cut into the TJ tub well for the hoop. Most people angle the top rearward and do not need to cut the tub. Is that why they do that or is angled actually better?
I just back halfed the frame and it is now moved inboard and the coilovers will be the next step so looking for input.

thanks,
A lot of it is going to depend on where in the natural arc of your rear suspension travel you will be spending most of your time. Its a fairly complicated question with a lot of other questions to ask before you can find what is best for you. If you are long arm you have a wider (a.k.a. Flatter) arc whereas if your arms are shorter the radius of your travel will be steeper- that is one issue. Your co setup and the ratio between your springs, and the subsequent ride height is an issue. Whether you will be "rock crawling" vs "rock racing" is an issue and whether you are going to be spending time on the street is an issue. The reason you see such variety is that we all have different answers for these questions.
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Old 06-21-2011, 06:34 PM   #3 (permalink)
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Yes it will be a long arm set up with dana 60's and 37" tires set with the belly about 22" off the ground and 12" fox coilovers in the middle of travel and driven on the street occassionally and always from home to the trails even if out of state. I dont plan on rockracing or competive crawling but hard core trails that require the dana 60's with 35 sline and 37" tires. I know there will always be alot of ways to skin a cat and someone will always say I went about it the wrong way or to much or to little. It this enough information to help me decide if I should lean my shocks back in the tub and no cutting or go straight up and cut out the wheel well?
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Old 06-21-2011, 08:46 PM   #4 (permalink)
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Yes it will be a long arm set up with dana 60's and 37" tires set with the belly about 22" off the ground and 12" fox coilovers in the middle of travel and driven on the street occassionally and always from home to the trails even if out of state. I dont plan on rockracing or competive crawling but hard core trails that require the dana 60's with 35 sline and 37" tires. I know there will always be alot of ways to skin a cat and someone will always say I went about it the wrong way or to much or to little. It this enough information to help me decide if I should lean my shocks back in the tub and no cutting or go straight up and cut out the wheel well?
Also assuming you are leaving the WB where it is? This is also a factor.

Well.. 12" with even up/down travel means a pretty short hoop. I'd probably be included to lean them to the rear. With only 12" of travel it really leaves a lot open.
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Old 06-22-2011, 08:27 AM   #5 (permalink)
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The tops of the front CO’s should lean back and in.
The tops of the rear CO’s should lean forward and in.
The reason you see the bolt on CO set ups all leaning the rear shock back is for packaging. The type of person who wants a kit (and some custom rigs too), also doesn’t want to cut into their body so the manufactures make a product to fit the bill.
There is a bunch of information on the subject if you just search. I didn’t search as well as I should have before I built mine and had to rebuild all the mounts. I originally built mine perpendicular to the axle at rest (which would have been correct if I was just making shock mounts, but for CO’s its different) but had to redo them because it was immediately obvious there would be a stability issue.
The reason they go back in the front and forward in the back is because of the arc of the control arms. And the reason they all angle in towards the center of the vehicle is because of progressive and regressive spring rates (makes it feel tippy if you don’t).
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Old 06-22-2011, 11:13 AM   #6 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BenE View Post
The tops of the front COís should lean back and in.
The tops of the rear COís should lean forward and in.
The reason you see the bolt on CO set ups all leaning the rear shock back is for packaging. The type of person who wants a kit (and some custom rigs too), also doesnít want to cut into their body so the manufactures make a product to fit the bill.
There is a bunch of information on the subject if you just search. I didnít search as well as I should have before I built mine and had to rebuild all the mounts. I originally built mine perpendicular to the axle at rest (which would have been correct if I was just making shock mounts, but for COís its different) but had to redo them because it was immediately obvious there would be a stability issue.
The reason they go back in the front and forward in the back is because of the arc of the control arms. And the reason they all angle in towards the center of the vehicle is because of progressive and regressive spring rates (makes it feel tippy if you donít).
Ben
thanks for this reply....dumb question now: Do all these same princples apply for air shocks or struts like ORI's??
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Old 06-22-2011, 11:22 AM   #7 (permalink)
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In my experience the ideal angle is between 10-15 degrees forward and the same angle in... That allows for maximum stability on sidehills and uphills... If you have front coilovers the should have the same angle in and toward the rear. That would give additional sidehill stability and give stability coming downhill. Usually any more angle than 15 degrees in any direction means that you will need special valving.
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Old 06-22-2011, 11:28 AM   #8 (permalink)
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Inward angle should be set up so that when fully flexed, the stuffed said maintains the shock at 90* to the axle.
And the lean front to rear is going to depend on who you talk to. If you angle them away from the direction of the links, the spring rate stays more linear, instead of changing as suspension moves. That's why spring rate calculators ask you the angle, it needs a differant spring rate.
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