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Topic Review (Newest First)
06-26-2014 09:20 AM
c130LM I'm in altus right now lol


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06-23-2014 09:47 PM
ahighfivetolife
Quote:
Originally Posted by c130LM View Post
well said. your rigs taking the trailer with it lol
Good to see another LM on here. I just swapped over to the C-17 world and there are some big loads for this plane.

Here's a shot of a 19,000 lb truck. The truck is secured with 25,000 lb chains all around. 4 forward and 2 aft.
06-23-2014 09:21 PM
c130LM well said. your rigs taking the trailer with it lol
11-21-2012 10:43 PM
ahighfivetolife
Quote:
Originally Posted by jeepdaddytj View Post
nope not the same ,, say the link fails were it goes under - say the pinion ,,, now you have nothing ,,,, always always have 4 separate tie downs
Haha, okay. Well until the link fails, the restraint is doubled. You can make up all the hypothetical situations you want. It's a textbook example of tying down equipment in aircraft that are pulling G's. Doesn't get much more stressful on a device than that.

These are the basic methods I've been taught and I use them every time I fly. Obviously I would recommend the safest route possible. If you want to use 4 separate tiedowns, go for it. It's not right or wrong. That's just your technique.
11-21-2012 03:49 PM
jeepdaddytj nope not the same ,, say the link fails were it goes under - say the pinion ,,, now you have nothing ,,,, always always have 4 separate tie downs
11-21-2012 11:09 AM
ahighfivetolife
Quote:
Originally Posted by dspin View Post
Wrapping a strap/chain around something does not double your load capacity unless you tie it back at two points.
I think that's common sense. As long as the chain/strap doesn't terminate at the vehicle attaching point and is attached back to the starting location or to an attachment in the same direction, the restraint is doubled. Pending the trailer attachment isn't the limiting factor.

Example: Hooked in at the left corner of the trailer, over the axle, under the pinion, back over the axle on the other side, and then to the right corner. Restraint doubled. May as well be two individual straps. (restraint wise). As pointed out, if that one strap/chain fails, it would be as if two straps/chains failed. Unlikely, but possible.
11-21-2012 10:59 AM
dspin Wrapping a strap/chain around something does not double your load capacity unless you tie it back at two points.
11-21-2012 08:40 AM
ahighfivetolife I'm an USAF C-130 Loadmaster by profession and we've got a lot of sensible rules for securing vehicles in our aircraft. I use the same rules for hauling my rig and it works out great.

1. Never mix straps and chains. (Straps stretch, chains don't)
2. If an item is wrapped around and looped back over an object it's strength is doubled. (5,000lb strap around the axle becomes 10,000)
3. No more than 50% of the tiedowns should be attached to the axles/suspension. (to prevent body roll)
4. G Requirement:

3.0 Forward
1.5 Lateral
1.5 Aft

Since braking is the most force in any direction applied, you can see why this is the most important. If you angle your tiedowns it's not hard to get the required lateral out of it too. For any dorks like myself out there here's an easy way to compute your restraint by using the "75% rule", meaning you're only getting 75% of the tiedown's strength due to angles that aren't giving you a straight pull:

1. Vehicle weight x G requirement = Weight to be restrained (6,000 x 3.0 = 18,000)
2. Tiedown rating x .75 = Actual restraint gained per tiedown (10,000 x .75 = 7500)
3. Weight to be restrained / Actual restraint gained per tiedown = Number of tiedowns required (18,000 / 7500 = 2.4 tiedowns)
4. Since 2.4 isn't possible, you round up to 3. But you want to install them symmetrically so you round up to 4.

My Blazer requires 4 10,000lb chains for forward restraint and two for aft restraint. The lateral requirement comes from the angles on the forward aft chains. It may seem like overkill, but I've had idiots pull out in front of me on a downhill slope and while slamming on the brakes I know that the vehicle isn't going to break loose. On the truck this means the Blazer not crushing my tailgate or worse, and in the aircraft it means a Humvee not crushing our troops!

Hope that helped and wasn't too much work.
10-24-2010 07:19 PM
coyote I just do (2 or 4) straps over the tire but my trailer has high 2 foot sides...mine can't go forward...for long hauls I add a chain to secure the front to the trailer and the rear....
10-24-2010 03:27 PM
yellowk20 Cross chained both ends,to the frame,with Ratchet binders,Grade 70 chain.

If I cant go to the frame, then I use the short Nylon straps with the metal hoop ends around the axles and cross chain from them I never wrap the chain around axle housings

I only use straps to tie down pipe,lumber,ect . never vehicles
10-24-2010 02:45 PM
GONRACIN ^^^ That's a picture perfect way of doing it...same way I do it on my car carrier (minus the binder, chains on rachets on truck)
10-24-2010 02:02 PM
Paul Gagnon Just thought I'd post some pictures of how I tied down my rig. I bought some chains from a local tow truck supplies place. The chain has a hook at one end and a T/J/hook cluster at the other end. T-hook on the front, J-hook on the rear. I take the slack chain and hang it on the hook so that if the binder fails it will still be tied down. I air up the tires and crank down the suspension until it is almost bottomed out. It is rock solid and never slacks off.
04-16-2010 07:42 PM
KyleQ This is how I strap my truck down - totally stable.

04-16-2010 10:23 AM
#rawkon 2 crossed chains in teh front, 2 Crossed straps in the rear and a safety chain. I usually go to the axles, but I have had several boucy rigs adn had to compress teh suspension instead to get it to ride worth a damn. I dont think either way is wrong, as long as you think it thru. I preferr to stabilize the body at some point when I can. When I towed the dakota i used the cnains around the frame in the front and the straps around the rar axle, It towed way better that way then with the body drifitng all over the place.
04-16-2010 07:46 AM
southern k5 When I tow my Cummins I use four 10k straps to the axle 2 in front, 2 in the rear crossed, one thing with it though it has almost zero suspension flex being a 2500.
04-16-2010 12:07 AM
DWT I've chained down the axles sometimes and body at others. I still need to build blocks to put betweeen the bumpstops and axles so there won't be an issue with body sway.
04-15-2010 10:07 AM
KyleQ I'll have to get some better pics - but I cross strap with axle straps front and rear. It keeps the truck stupid solid and they straps never get loose - I've got a friend who says to the frame is THE only way to do it, tried it, and the straps were fuck all loose after 10 miles, I cranked on they ratchets as hard as they would go.



I use S-Line straps, 3,333 working and 10K max - I've got D rings on my trailer that I hook to and to keep anything from fraying I use S-Line traps that have a sheath over them with rings on both ends, wrap it around the axle, snap the ratchet in and crank it down. When I have people help strap down a truck they say it's the best and easiest system they have ever seen.

Two straps per axle, 6,666 working load and 20K max at diagonal angles- it isn't going anywhere.
04-15-2010 08:36 AM
jam0o0 i run one strap on front axle and one on the rear axle. then pull the front down with the winch. and run two straps crossed from the frame to the sides of the trailer.

with only axle straps my truck is way too flexy to stay where it should. my to rig is 7k lbs and the trail truck is 6k lbs. you know if you've tied it down wrong.
04-14-2010 08:25 PM
willysman07003
Quote:
Originally Posted by GONRACIN View Post
by "car carrier" you must mean roll-back, right? Just judging by your tie-down method....that's all...I drive a car carrier, 11 unit rig, and 4 chains or tire straps per vehicle....personally I like chains better...
i drive both dot is a bitch where we drop so we always use 4 chains or straps
04-14-2010 07:28 PM
Filthy McChevy My carhauler is made from a section of a bigrig carhauler trailer, it has 6 ratcheting chain tiedowns, I use 1 chain on each corner of whatever vehicle I am towing on it and have never had a problem. I usually bring down the suspension 2 or 3 inches. I angle the front chains back and down from the towed vehicle frame and the rear chains forward and down from the towed vehicle frame. I have almost every type tie down device known to man and for carhauling I prefer chains.
04-14-2010 07:08 PM
GONRACIN
Quote:
Originally Posted by willysman07003 View Post
i drive car carriers and i always use four chains and when i load my rig its flexy so i block the suspenion to keep it from swaying. and if you are using straps or chains always cross them side to side it will keep it from moving to the left or right this is how wreckmaster says you should tie some thing down. oh and you should also try and pull downwards as well
by "car carrier" you must mean roll-back, right? Just judging by your tie-down method....that's all...I drive a car carrier, 11 unit rig, and 4 chains or tire straps per vehicle....personally I like chains better...
04-14-2010 07:04 PM
Morpheus Cycles I use chains and binders crossed 2 on the front axle and 2 on the rear axle then 1 strap front and 1 rear to keep the body roll to a minimum.
04-14-2010 04:27 PM
willysman07003 i drive car carriers and i always use four chains and when i load my rig its flexy so i block the suspenion to keep it from swaying. and if you are using straps or chains always cross them side to side it will keep it from moving to the left or right this is how wreckmaster says you should tie some thing down. oh and you should also try and pull downwards as well
04-14-2010 02:58 PM
rajincajingt
Quote:
Originally Posted by mrtoddb View Post
Hell, a couple of ropes and some bungee cords and you'll be fine! Just take corners fast and the g forces will snug it to the trailer!!!

2 straps over axle in front and 2 in rear to axle. Mine is not super flexy either and I broke to straps going to frame, from bouncing. Oklahoma roads? It's gonna bounce and bounce hard, no matter what you do.
you didnt have the straps tight enough

if you strap to the body, make sure that the straps are tight and the suspension is on the bump stops.
04-14-2010 10:47 AM
HEAVY METAL the best way IMO is 4 chains, one at each corner on the axles nd two straps. front and rear too suck the suspension down too stop movement.
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