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Old 05-08-2012, 06:40 AM   #1 (permalink)
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Laminated 2x6's instead of 6x6?

I'm going to start building a pole barn style shop and was wondering if anybody's done the laminated 2x6's instead of treated 6x6s? I've built a few pole barns and we've always used treated 6x6's, but a buddy if mine had one built last year and the company used 3 2x6's glued/nailed together. I had never heard of this but after some googleing it seems to be the norm, and is a decent amount cheaper and supposedly stronger.
I did some searching on here but didn't come up with much so I figured I'd ask.
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Old 05-08-2012, 07:38 AM   #2 (permalink)
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I used them on my shop build and they are fine. Only thing is, if they get wet, they have a potential to warp, but I guess thats with any wood.

They are actually a true 6"x6" post too and they are not usually just 2x6's glued and spiked -they are milled lumber glued spiked and then ran through a jointer to finish the outer dimension.
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Old 05-08-2012, 10:15 AM   #3 (permalink)
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(3) 2x6 laminated together will make a stronger product in that you will have less warping and twisting than a single post, as well as not nearly the issue of the wood drying out and splitting. the load capabilities will be roughly the same for a like sized solid post or laminated.

the down site is esthetics of a single solid post is better than laminated with nail heads showing, as well as getting all the lumber to match up perfectly flush on all sides will be next to impossible without milling after it is built.


if you are doing like mudzerk and getting rough lumber milled, glued and re-milled, basically a LVL idea post, then you will likely be the same cost as a solid post but with less/no warp/twist issues.

Last edited by crimsen; 05-08-2012 at 10:16 AM.
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Old 05-08-2012, 11:32 AM   #4 (permalink)
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No milling, it will just be glued and nailed, I'm not concerned with looks so much as strength. It looks like the 2x6s would save me a couple hundred dollars so that'll probably be the way I go.
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Old 05-08-2012, 01:38 PM   #5 (permalink)
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Just remember that 3 2x6s is actually going to be 4.5" x 5.5" where a post will be 5.5" x 5.5". Not sure if this is an issue for you, it wouldn't be for me. But you better account for it during layout.
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Old 05-09-2012, 03:03 PM   #6 (permalink)
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I don't know if it's the right way to do things, but i needed a beam when i took an interior wall down, and to make it the right width I glued and screwed a strip of plywood between the 2x8's to get the dimension i was after. Is this acceptable or does this weaken it??
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Old 05-09-2012, 04:45 PM   #7 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chimaira989 View Post
I don't know if it's the right way to do things, but i needed a beam when i took an interior wall down, and to make it the right width I glued and screwed a strip of plywood between the 2x8's to get the dimension i was after. Is this acceptable or does this weaken it??
Some people do that to add strength
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Old 05-09-2012, 07:36 PM   #8 (permalink)
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I don't know if it's the right way to do things, but i needed a beam when i took an interior wall down, and to make it the right width I glued and screwed a strip of plywood between the 2x8's to get the dimension i was after. Is this acceptable or does this weaken it??
It's perfectly acceptable to add plywood or OSB in between 2x material to gain the desired width. It's done with window and door headers all the time. If I were in your shoes, and doing this to build a post, I would through bolt through all 3 2x6's and the plywood probably every 4'. Use a 1/2" hex bolt with fender washers on both sides and a nylock nut. The down forces of the loads will constantly be trying to spit the 2x6's apart in that configuration, the through bolts will prevent this and allow you to tighten the bolts up as the 2x6's dry and shrink over time.
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Old 05-09-2012, 07:43 PM   #9 (permalink)
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I am just about building a house, and that is the ONLY way that I would do the posts for the car port and for the front porch. All 6 posts are in the area of 16' long, and I was very worried about them twisting like I have seen 6x6's do so often. I used 1/2" plywood between each 2x6. I did this for extra strength, and to make them have the same dimensions as a 6x6. I would DEFINITELY do the plywood in the middle if I were you!
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Old 05-10-2012, 07:59 AM   #10 (permalink)
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Adding plywood to increase the dimension is perfectly acceptable and common.



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It's perfectly acceptable to add plywood or OSB in between 2x material to gain the desired width. It's done with window and door headers all the time. If I were in your shoes, and doing this to build a post, I would through bolt through all 3 2x6's and the plywood probably every 4'. Use a 1/2" hex bolt with fender washers on both sides and a nylock nut. The down forces of the loads will constantly be trying to spit the 2x6's apart in that configuration, the through bolts will prevent this and allow you to tighten the bolts up as the 2x6's dry and shrink over time.
I think your going way over the deep end here. Normal nailing patterns for a beam ( 1/2 lumber dimensional width in nails every 16", starting 6" from the end. ) will never try to seperate with a verticle load. Even with minimal nailing, the verticle load is even through the whole width of the post, so if it is unsupported and trys to flex, all material would want to flex in a similar fashion. If its flexing, your post is under sized. (excessive flex. There is some allowable and expected minor movement available.
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Old 05-10-2012, 03:21 PM   #11 (permalink)
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Adding plywood to increase the dimension is perfectly acceptable and common.





I think your going way over the deep end here. Normal nailing patterns for a beam ( 1/2 lumber dimensional width in nails every 16", starting 6" from the end. ) will never try to seperate with a verticle load. Even with minimal nailing, the verticle load is even through the whole width of the post, so if it is unsupported and trys to flex, all material would want to flex in a similar fashion. If its flexing, your post is under sized. (excessive flex. There is some allowable and expected minor movement available.
Never say never. I have seen 2x8 posts constructed this way begin to delaminate from heavy snow loads up in the Sierra Nevada Mountains near Truckee Ca when I was building custom mountain homes. I also saw a 6x6 post that was point loaded on top of a 6x12 door header and the snow load had pushed the 6x6 post halfway through the header. Mother nature is a wicked bitch, and if you get complacent with her she'll kick you square in the nuts.
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Old 05-10-2012, 05:55 PM   #12 (permalink)
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Laminates are supposed to be much stronger and better than regular lumber. The huge pole barn local place uses them for all their buildings. I have a 30ft clear span garage done this way and have no issues with snow, winds and even a tree that damaged the roof.
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Old 05-10-2012, 07:50 PM   #13 (permalink)
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Laminates are supposed to be much stronger and better than regular lumber. The huge pole barn local place uses them for all their buildings. I have a 30ft clear span garage done this way and have no issues with snow, winds and even a tree that damaged the roof.
Your laminated beam is most likely an egineered piece of wood that you or your builder had to special order. We are talking about simply nailing 2x6s together to achieve a desired width. Totally different animal altogether.
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Old 05-10-2012, 10:32 PM   #14 (permalink)
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off topic, how big are you goin with this, if its 800SQft or less and you already have a pad poured why not just frame it normally rather than a big ugly pole barn that likely with have ugly sheet metal and no insulation...
framing walls is relatively cheap,plywood is cheap, and framing the roof is cheap by avoiding trusses. hell even hardi plank siding is cheao these days...
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Old 05-11-2012, 07:59 AM   #15 (permalink)
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SCREWS not nailed! And make sure they wont deteriorate in the natural moisture in the wood over time, I have seen many with the head of the screw rotted off and the boards separating.
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Old 05-11-2012, 08:50 AM   #16 (permalink)
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off topic, how big are you goin with this, if its 800SQft or less and you already have a pad poured why not just frame it normally rather than a big ugly pole barn that likely with have ugly sheet metal and no insulation...
framing walls is relatively cheap,plywood is cheap, and framing the roof is cheap by avoiding trusses. hell even hardi plank siding is cheao these days...
32w x 48L x 14h I already crunched the numbers and stick built will cost quite a bit more. I'm not concerned with looks but I'm more for function over looks anyway and it will be a few hundred feet from the house. It will be insulated at some point when funds allow.
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Old 05-11-2012, 02:15 PM   #17 (permalink)
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My Morton is built that way.
But with 2 x 8's since I have taller side walls. (18 feet).
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Old 04-20-2014, 04:56 AM   #18 (permalink)
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I'm going to start building a pole barn style shop and was wondering if anybody's done the laminated 2x6's instead of treated 6x6s? I've built a few pole barns and we've always used treated 6x6's, but a buddy if mine had one built last year and the company used 3 2x6's glued/nailed together. I had never heard of this but after some googleing it seems to be the norm, and is a decent amount cheaper and supposedly stronger.
I did some searching on here but didn't come up with much so I figured I'd ask.
So when putting the boards together (I am considering 4 (quantity) 2x6 boards).........would one alternate the "crest" of the boards?
Like, when you use boards for floor board supports, you always make sure the crest of the boards are "up".

--------/\-------

I was thinking (maybe too hard) that if you put all the crests the same way, it would be more likely all 4 would bend over time.
But if they were alternating, they would be "fighting each other" to ~not~ bend.

I'm also looking at this product, that has the correct dimensions for (homemade) laminated beams.

https://www.permacolumn.com/store-sturdi-wall

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4-ply 6" Wet Set Bracket
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Old 04-20-2014, 05:24 AM   #19 (permalink)
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My pole barn, built in 95 uses laminated posts with no issues.
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Old 04-22-2014, 10:47 PM   #20 (permalink)
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Called glulams and they are common. However, make sure to get exterior rated. They have exterior rated glue in them.
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Old 04-22-2014, 11:23 PM   #21 (permalink)
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My shop is flanked with carports, which use 2x6's shot together with an air nailer for posts. They do not split and warp like 6x6's. They sit on concrete fottings above ground. I coated them with copper naphthalene for good measure.
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Old 04-23-2014, 05:02 PM   #22 (permalink)
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So when putting the boards together (I am considering 4 (quantity) 2x6 boards).........would one alternate the "crest" of the boards?
yes, that is how it is done. the thing nice about making your own beams is that you can make a 50 ft long header and haul everything in the back of your pickup. space your joints 4 ft apart so that no 2 joints are near each other in the laminations. making a long continuous beam is stronger than making a separate beam spanning each post span.

here is my 50 ft long beam consisting of 4 layers of 2x10



eventually i poured the floor and did this



the main beams inside the barn are made the same way. 4 layers of 2x10, 50 ft long.
try buying a 6''x10''x50' at home depot

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