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Old 09-06-2013, 12:47 PM   #1 (permalink)
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220v to 110v

Can you readily rewire an electric motor that is normally 220v to run at 110v? I've got a saw that I was able to do this with (diagram on motor), but wasn't sure if you can do this with all 220v motors or if the motor has to be designed to run on a dual voltage.
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Old 09-06-2013, 01:00 PM   #2 (permalink)
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Can you readily rewire an electric motor that is normally 220v to run at 110v? I've got a saw that I was able to do this with (diagram on motor), but wasn't sure if you can do this with all 220v motors or if the motor has to be designed to run on a dual voltage.
Unless it says so on the motor, NO.
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Old 09-06-2013, 01:17 PM   #3 (permalink)
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I was going to suggest that you could run it off of dual 110 volt sources, but not everyone would get the joke, so instead I'll just ask for more info.

Why do you want to do this?
What are you trying to do?
What's it for?
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Old 09-06-2013, 01:22 PM   #4 (permalink)
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actually you could if you have 220v elsewhere in the house (most houses do) you need to pull 110 off of each hot leg of the 220v main feed, Usually your panel will have 2 buss bars in it, one for each leg. A 110v breaker only connects to 1 of them and a 220v breaker connects to both. If you have outlets breakered to both bars you could theoretically pull a cord from an outlet on each bar and wire them up to work. Basically all residential power is "2-phase" meaning you have 2 110v lines coming into the house that have a 180 degree opposite waveform (opposite phases). Combine the 2 and you have 220v.
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Old 09-06-2013, 01:27 PM   #5 (permalink)
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I'm looking into buying an industrial sewing machine to sew heavy canvas etc. Most I'm finding are 220v, and the room I'm going to be placing it in is no where near a 220 line. And I can't see running 220v into a bedroom, so I was hoping I could rewire the motor to 110.
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Old 09-06-2013, 02:15 PM   #6 (permalink)
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Would a VFD work in this case? We have a machine at work for welding that is 208-240v+ or something like that, might even be 3 phase that runs off of 110v, but it first passes through a VFD. YMMV

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*I know little to nothing about electricity... I just know how our setup is.
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Old 09-08-2013, 10:13 PM   #7 (permalink)
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I'm looking into buying an industrial sewing machine to sew heavy canvas etc. Most I'm finding are 220v, and the room I'm going to be placing it in is no where near a 220 line. And I can't see running 220v into a bedroom, so I was hoping I could rewire the motor to 110.
Your issue is single/3 phase first and foremost. Secondly, most motors (unless marked) are one voltage only. No offense, but you really need some education before you start "rewiring" anything.
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Old 09-09-2013, 03:09 AM   #8 (permalink)
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Wasn't about to rewire blindly, that's why I asked real quick. I have a 220v motor on a saw in my garage that can be rewired to 110v by changing the wires around so I wasn't sure if this was a norm or not.
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Old 09-09-2013, 05:29 AM   #9 (permalink)
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Artisan makes a sewing machine motor that runs on 110. It is a .8 hp servo motor that is good for 4000 rpm.
http://www.artisansew.com/motors.html
Consew has a variety of dual voltage motors, both clutch and servo.
http://www.consew.com/List/Machine-Stands

What brands are you looking at, I'm having a hard time finding any that are 220 only.

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Old 09-09-2013, 11:43 AM   #10 (permalink)
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actually you could if you have 220v elsewhere in the house (most houses do) you need to pull 110 off of each hot leg of the 220v main feed, Usually your panel will have 2 buss bars in it, one for each leg. A 110v breaker only connects to 1 of them and a 220v breaker connects to both. If you have outlets breakered to both bars you could theoretically pull a cord from an outlet on each bar and wire them up to work. Basically all residential power is "2-phase" meaning you have 2 110v lines coming into the house that have a 180 degree opposite waveform (opposite phases). Combine the 2 and you have 220v.
|You need to go shove your fingers in a blender so you can never again give advice like this.

1. There's a reason that wires are ran side by side, as in an NMD 14/2, so the mag fields cancel each other out. Using only one wire from two cables can cause problems.

2. If you "pull a cord" from two separate réceptacles then the breakers would not be tied together.

3. 120/240 residential power is single phase. The sine waves that feed both buss bars are opposite in the voltage they produce but they are still in phase with each other, meaning it's single phase. When one reaches it's max positive voltage, which happens 60 times per second, the other reaches it's max negative voltage. Three phase power reaches it's max voltages 120 degrees apart from the other phases.
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Old 09-09-2013, 12:07 PM   #11 (permalink)
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It can be done with a 2:1 buck/boost transformer.

You can also be creative with your dryer receptacle, and a DIY cord assembly.

Salvage an old dryer plug, run it into a small breaker box (the PVC 2-space for a hot tub is handy), 2-pole 15A breaker, and how ever many feet of cord to get to sewing machine.

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Old 09-09-2013, 05:44 PM   #12 (permalink)
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I'm just looking for one that can do leather, vinyl etc. I'm needing to sew some pretty thick stuff, it's necessarily has hard as leather, but can easily be 1/4" thick and a residential sewing machine doesn't have the ass for it. I'm just searching craigslist and there was a guy somewhat close to me that had about 4 industrial sewing machines for sale for around 200 but they were listed at 220v
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Old 09-09-2013, 06:41 PM   #13 (permalink)
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It's possible that the motors are dual voltage but currently setup for 220. It would be easy to find out once you know what motor you are dealing with. What head units? Clutch drive or servo motors? For general purpose use, I'd recommend a servo motor. Clutch motors are more for high speed use, the servo motors offer more control. Make sure that the heads have reverse. Some real heavy duty high production machines don't have reverse, and are meant more for very high speed use, usually with clutch drive motors.

Make sure that the reverse is easy to use while still using both hands to run the material. Make sure that the head is capable of 1/4" thicknesses-most are, but you never know. You might want to find a machine with needle feed and/ or a walking foot.

If the head works for you, but the motor doesn't, a new 110v servo motor can be had for about $130. $200 would be a great price for a good quality head in decent shape, if it comes with a motor and a table for that, it's a screaming deal. Where are you located? If it all checks out, I would be interested in buying one of those machines as well.
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Old 09-10-2013, 07:44 AM   #14 (permalink)
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Old 09-10-2013, 07:50 AM   #15 (permalink)
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Odds are your motor will support 120VAC.

But no home craft guy can manage to determine/adapt it with out a little learned help.

Yank the motor and tote it to the nearest rewind/alternator shop....the guys there are prolly as blue collar as you ever hope to be and should assist you free of charge.

If it turns out the motor is strictly single phase 240, then I bet they will trade you even for a single phase 120 and even show you how to connect it.

Sorry, Girls, start learning to speak 240 steada 220 cause all utilities are a really stiff 240/120 now a days..Hell, I meter 248/129VAC here at my house on a good day.
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Old 09-10-2013, 09:27 AM   #16 (permalink)
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Odds are your motor will support 120VAC.

But no home craft guy can manage to determine/adapt it with out a little learned help.

Yank the motor and tote it to the nearest rewind/alternator shop....the guys there are prolly as blue collar as you ever hope to be and should assist you free of charge.

If it turns out the motor is strictly single phase 240, then I bet they will trade you even for a single phase 120 and even show you how to connect it.

Sorry, Girls, start learning to speak 240 steada 220 cause all utilities are a really stiff 240/120 now a days..Hell, I meter 248/129VAC here at my house on a good day.
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Old 09-10-2013, 08:43 PM   #17 (permalink)
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Would a VFD work in this case? We have a machine at work for welding that is 208-240v+ or something like that, might even be 3 phase that runs off of 110v, but it first passes through a VFD. YMMV

Disclaimer:

*I know little to nothing about electricity... I just know how our setup is.
Well since my post was ignored, , I got some pics of our setup.

240/480v 3ph motor running off of 120v through a VFD at usually ~2Hz. Still haven't burned it up yet. I don't know if this is doable for 240v 1ph, as I know jack about electricity, just thought it *might* be an option. It's got a speed control and Fwd./Rev. on the front of the box.
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Old 09-10-2013, 11:00 PM   #18 (permalink)
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actually you could if you have 220v elsewhere in the house (most houses do) you need to pull 110 off of each hot leg of the 220v main feed, Usually your panel will have 2 buss bars in it, one for each leg. A 110v breaker only connects to 1 of them and a 220v breaker connects to both. If you have outlets breakered to both bars you could theoretically pull a cord from an outlet on each bar and wire them up to work. Basically all residential power is "2-phase" meaning you have 2 110v lines coming into the house that have a 180 degree opposite waveform (opposite phases). Combine the 2 and you have 220v.
While this is technically possible it is NOT advisable for many reasons...

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Originally Posted by TJKeith View Post
Odds are your motor will support 120VAC.

But no home craft guy can manage to determine/adapt it with out a little learned help.

Yank the motor and tote it to the nearest rewind/alternator shop....the guys there are prolly as blue collar as you ever hope to be and should assist you free of charge.

If it turns out the motor is strictly single phase 240, then I bet they will trade you even for a single phase 120 and even show you how to connect it.

Sorry, Girls, start learning to speak 240 steada 220 cause all utilities are a really stiff 240/120 now a days..Hell, I meter 248/129VAC here at my house on a good day.
Good advice...the motor rewind shop I deal with is really decent. Your local shop should be able to tell you what your real options are.
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Old 09-10-2013, 11:24 PM   #19 (permalink)
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actually you could if you have 220v elsewhere in the house (most houses do) you need to pull 110 off of each hot leg of the 220v main feed, Usually your panel will have 2 buss bars in it, one for each leg. A 110v breaker only connects to 1 of them and a 220v breaker connects to both. If you have outlets breakered to both bars you could theoretically pull a cord from an outlet on each bar and wire them up to work. Basically all residential power is "2-phase" meaning you have 2 110v lines coming into the house that have a 180 degree opposite waveform (opposite phases). Combine the 2 and you have 220v.
Yup, that'll work providing you simply replace 2 120 breakers on the left or right side of your panel with a single 240...And as long as those breakers are stacked one right above the other.

In residential installs, you gotta play close attention to phase balance/even tho it's called single phase.

Once the power drop leaves the pole, it's offered as two 120VAC drops and a common......Those two 120 drops enter your panel and attach to two bus bars where each 120 breaker on the left taps into one bus, then the next breaker on the left down from the top attaches to the opposite bus, so if you jack in a 2 pole 240VAC breaker, you are actually tapping into both left and right 120VAC buses....Same on the right side of the box.

Yes, you can go cheap and use two 120 breakers to supply a 240 load, but take care to keep it balanced and tap them off both the left and right bus.

Even tho it's called single phase, it's easy to end up with phase imbalance if you don't pay attention.

The above poster is MOST correct and his advise will go a long way toward saving your life and that of your appliances.
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Old 09-11-2013, 11:51 AM   #20 (permalink)
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Yup, that'll work providing you simply replace 2 120 breakers on the left or right side of your panel with a single 240...And as long as those breakers are stacked one right above the other.

In residential installs, you gotta play close attention to phase balance/even tho it's called single phase.

Once the power drop leaves the pole, it's offered as two 120VAC drops and a common......Those two 120 drops enter your panel and attach to two bus bars where each 120 breaker on the left taps into one bus, then the next breaker on the left down from the top attaches to the opposite bus, so if you jack in a 2 pole 240VAC breaker, you are actually tapping into both left and right 120VAC buses....Same on the right side of the box.

Yes, you can go cheap and use two 120 breakers to supply a 240 load, but take care to keep it balanced and tap them off both the left and right bus.

Even tho it's called single phase, it's easy to end up with phase imbalance if you don't pay attention.

The above poster is MOST correct and his advise will go a long way toward saving your life and that of your appliances.
Not this shit again.

You really are a fucktard and don't know jack shit.
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Old 09-11-2013, 06:01 PM   #21 (permalink)
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Well since my post was ignored, , I got some pics of our setup.

240/480v 3ph motor running off of 120v through a VFD at usually ~2Hz. Still haven't burned it up yet. I don't know if this is doable for 240v 1ph, as I know jack about electricity, just thought it *might* be an option. It's got a speed control and Fwd./Rev. on the front of the box.
This.

We do it at work all the time. Powerflex VFD's are good.
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