Bridgeport mill weight? - Pirate4x4.Com : 4x4 and Off-Road Forum
 
Pirate4x4.Com : 4x4 and Off-Road Forum  

Go Back   Pirate4x4.Com : 4x4 and Off-Road Forum > General Tech > Shop and Tools
Notices

Reply
 
Share Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 07-10-2006, 09:32 PM   #1 (permalink)
JR
Hornblower
 
JR's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Member # 8524
Location: La Crescenta, CA
Posts: 4,470
Bridgeport mill weight?

I just bought a used Bridgeport mill.
It's just a basic manel model with no automated bells and whistels.

How much does it weigh? It would help with the transplant to my garage.

I've been looking for a used tig welder for a month and came accross this mill deal.
On an impulse, I bought it.
So now, I wondering if it was a good deal. What do you think, I can take it...
Attached Images
 
JR is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-10-2006, 09:36 PM   #2 (permalink)
JR
Hornblower
 
JR's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Member # 8524
Location: La Crescenta, CA
Posts: 4,470
$1,500 with no tooling.
Attached Images
 
JR is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old 07-10-2006, 09:41 PM   #3 (permalink)
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Member # 50092
Location: NJ
Posts: 501
What size is it?

Figure about a ton
http://www.bpt.com/index.asp?pageID=943&prodID=56
Kartracer55 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-10-2006, 09:42 PM   #4 (permalink)
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Member # 43613
Location: West Lafayette, In
Posts: 345
Send a message via AIM to BigWhiteStroke
Depends on how tight it is, how accurate it is, and how good the ways are. The table looks a little rough, and it doesn't seem to be variable speed, but I think you got a decent deal.
BigWhiteStroke is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-10-2006, 10:06 PM   #5 (permalink)
JR
Hornblower
 
JR's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Member # 8524
Location: La Crescenta, CA
Posts: 4,470
It's a standerd 9x42.

I got weight estimates from 1700 to 3500 lbs

I had a machinery mover ready to go with the move. After some questions, it turns out he was going to use a 23k lb fork lift. Together with the mill, that might collapse my beam supported driveway.
So now, I hooked up with a mover with a mono rail.
$275 to move it 30 miles.
JR is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-10-2006, 10:12 PM   #6 (permalink)
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Member # 50092
Location: NJ
Posts: 501
beam supported driveway?
Kartracer55 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-10-2006, 10:18 PM   #7 (permalink)
JR
Hornblower
 
JR's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Member # 8524
Location: La Crescenta, CA
Posts: 4,470
I live on a slope, so as the driveway goes down to the garage eventually it is suspended by wood beams (albeit, HUGE). Does that make sense?
JR is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-10-2006, 10:55 PM   #8 (permalink)
I'm back and watchin
 
Easy Rick's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Member # 43607
Location: Building Trick cars, pretty close to heaven.
Posts: 4,161
About a ton is close. But, you can remove the head and move the bed, base as one piece and head, motor as another. There should be 4 bolts holding the head on where it pivots/swivels side to side. That is how I moved mine and mine is larger than yours!! LOL ! Seriosly they are not that heavy. I used my cheap ass cherry picker to move/set mine in two pieces and it didn't even strain, that much!

The value is in the eyes of the new owner.

No worries brotha,
Easy Rick.
__________________
KOH racer #554

Huge thanks to our partners:

Trick Toys Fabrication, NITTO Tires, Longfield Super Joints, PSC steering components, Brian Smith Development.............tricktoysracing@yahoo.com
Easy Rick is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-11-2006, 01:04 PM   #9 (permalink)
Wheeler
 
Jeeperz_Creeperz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Member # 50897
Location: Wyandotte, MI
Posts: 243
Did you get this moved?

I just moved a mill like this using an A-Frame hoist with chainfall, a car trailer, and a 3K capacity Hilo.

We rolled it on 3 pipes to get it out of the building. I'd guess the weight is in the 1500-2000 neighborhood. You can actually put this in the back of a pickup.
Jeeperz_Creeperz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-11-2006, 04:51 PM   #10 (permalink)
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Member # 11168
Location: Poulsbo WA
Posts: 1,169
Send a message via Yahoo to d.d.machine
There only 2,400 LBS for a small ser 1 J head machine. I carry two at a time in the back of my 3/4 ton ford.

to get it out of the truck just put a couple 2"x10" boards in the rafters and run a couple 4x4`s to support the load to the floor. building is only used to keep the 2x10`s and 4x4 upright.

Lower the table all the way down and loosen ( one turn )the four 3/4" nuts on the front of the head then there is a 3/4" nut on the right side of the head that runs a worm gear to angle the head , Pull the draw bar out the top of the spindle and swing the head up side down,

three bars work great to roll it or just get a friend to help you grab the table and slide it were you need it.

What ever you do "DON`T PICK IT UP FROM THE BOTTOM"
Bridgeports are a top heavy and likes to flip over
d.d.machine is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-11-2006, 06:25 PM   #11 (permalink)
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Member # 11256
Location: San Antonio
Posts: 1,801
I don't think it's all that great of a price with no tooling and the table looks a little rough but it's all about the area you are in. We have a lot of machine shops going out of business in this area on a regular basis and you can get a full power xy machine with a DRO for that price. But if that's what they are going for in your area then that's what you pay.

Here you could get that machine for between 500-750 depending on what it looks like in person

-ben
m016324 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-11-2006, 06:35 PM   #12 (permalink)
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Member # 43613
Location: West Lafayette, In
Posts: 345
Send a message via AIM to BigWhiteStroke
Quote:
Originally Posted by m016324
I don't think it's all that great of a price with no tooling and the table looks a little rough but it's all about the area you are in. We have a lot of machine shops going out of business in this area on a regular basis and you can get a full power xy machine with a DRO for that price. But if that's what they are going for in your area then that's what you pay.

Here you could get that machine for between 500-750 depending on what it looks like in person

-ben

Damn I may have to make a trip out there.
BigWhiteStroke is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-11-2006, 07:42 PM   #13 (permalink)
Not 5S compliant
 
Scott@Rockstomper's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Member # 1889
Location: Firestone, Colorado, USA
Posts: 6,734
I'd figure on it being 2-2.5k pounds.

The bigger catch is if you're planning on putting it into your garage through 7 or 8 foot door, if it's the size of either of my two Bridgeport clones (they're over 7 feet tall).

We used a "clown car" (boom forklift, weighs ~12k, kinda looks like a mini Gradall) to move both of mine in (one by one) and had no trouble, but my driveway is on-grade as well.

If you do decide to do as Easy Rick suggested and take it apart, take the vertical bolts out of the base ONLY... don't screw around with any of the rotational head-tilting stuff, as that's a HUGE PITA to get zero'd back in if it's out of adjustment.

Secondarily, if you do decide to take it apart, you can probably move the pieces individually with an engine hoist (your driveway is paved, right? mine's not, so this option doesn't apply to me) and then reassemble them once it's in your garage.

For your area, it's not a bad deal. If you want to feel really bad about it, I can help, but I won't unless you ask.
Scott@Rockstomper is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-11-2006, 08:19 PM   #14 (permalink)
JR
Hornblower
 
JR's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Member # 8524
Location: La Crescenta, CA
Posts: 4,470
We'll see how hose-a does with the move tomorrow.

Anyway, I keep hearing that the table looks rough. Is that because it has a rust on it?

I could have had the same type of mill with DRO, power feed, 2 hp varible speed and a bunch of boxes all over it. But it scard me and generally was more beat up. I just want somthing simple. I want to mill junk
JR is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-11-2006, 08:37 PM   #15 (permalink)
JR
Hornblower
 
JR's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Member # 8524
Location: La Crescenta, CA
Posts: 4,470
Tell me what to look for to see if I bought a bad/ warn-out mill?
JR is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-11-2006, 08:55 PM   #16 (permalink)
Not 5S compliant
 
Scott@Rockstomper's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Member # 1889
Location: Firestone, Colorado, USA
Posts: 6,734
Quote:
Originally Posted by JR
Tell me what to look for to see if I bought a bad/ warn-out mill?
Over-generalizing, loose table. Lots of backlash in the handwheel crank assemblies, loose ways (they're adjustable for wear, to a certain point), just general looseness. If the table is loose, you'll have trouble making good looking cuts, holding tolerances on parts, etc. If the surfaces that the table rides on are scarred, you'll have trouble bringing it back into good working order; if they're not scarred, it's more likely just adjustment (unless a crank screw is worn out, in which case, it's potentially a new ballscrew, which can be spendy) to bring it back.
Scott@Rockstomper is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-12-2006, 06:50 AM   #17 (permalink)
Pigs Fly
 
vetteboy79's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Member # 31621
Location: Morganville, NJ
Posts: 6,161
Send a message via AIM to vetteboy79
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigWhiteStroke
Depends on how tight it is, how accurate it is, and how good the ways are. The table looks a little rough, and it doesn't seem to be variable speed, but I think you got a decent deal.
It is variable speed, you just have to move the belts around, and there's a hi/lo range selector.

I learned on that same model, without DROs or anything, only a powered feed in X direction. If the handles have a lot of backlash you might find it difficult to hold tolerances if you need to go back and forth, because when you change direction you'll lose your distance reference. Having the DRO makes things a lot easier on you and also faster - but it's not a bad experience learning without one.

Like was mentioned, the backlash in the handles can be adjusted a certain degree, depending on how worn the leadscrews are. Also make sure the spindle bearings are in decent shape (you'll be able to tell by listening to it). Those machines generally last an extremely long time, but there are maintenance items that need to be taken care of, and it really depends on the shop/user you got it from whether these things were kept up with or not.
__________________
'94 XJ RIP, time to move on
New East Coast TTB racer in the works, trimmin' the fat...
Build Thread

Flying Pig Racing #512
vetteboy79 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-12-2006, 08:08 AM   #18 (permalink)
Zeus of the Sluice
 
GOAT1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Member # 5969
Location: Bloomfield, WI
Posts: 3,073
I just moved a lathe and mill out of some guys garage to my shop. Went to the Cat rental center and had them deliver a forklift to the house. The forklift was only $25 per hr and $30 each way for delivery, took less than 2 hrs to pack up and load the mill and lathe. I have a forklift at my shop to unload it. If they can load it where you are buying it, you can just get a forklift delivered to your house.

BTW the mill is a bridgeport clone similar to what you have, the spec sheet lists it as 2200 lbs.

I just sold one similar to yours for $800.
GOAT1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-12-2006, 09:20 AM   #19 (permalink)
JR
Hornblower
 
JR's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Member # 8524
Location: La Crescenta, CA
Posts: 4,470
It looks like I paid about twice too much for it . Oh well.
I'm going to tool it up and make the best of it

I'm having it transported this morning, I'll let you know if any drama takes place.
Thanks for the info.
JR is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-16-2006, 12:58 AM   #20 (permalink)
d9d
Wheeler
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Member # 20699
Location: SW Oregon
Posts: 190
Rust on the table doesn't mean much if it's just surface stuff.

Take a 2 week vacation, and have one cool night with some humidity while you're gone; and you'll have rust on your machine tools when you get home. It happens.

Steel-wool it off, vacuum the debris, and rub it with oil. That's all you can do.

With the screws and ways, the problem isn't so much 'wear', the problem is -uneven- wear. I.e., worn more in one spot than in another. 95% of the time, you'll find the center 8-12" of travel worn more than the ends.

When you adjust the gibs on the ways, or the nuts on the screws, to take up the slop, make sure you run the axis back and forth over the full travel as you adjust a bit at a time....and no matter how much you want to (to make a nice tight machine) do not tighten them beyond what's right for the -least- worn area of travel.

If you adjust it snug in the most worn center portion, someday you WILL crank it into the end portion; and eat your leadscrew-nut in a big hurry.


ps; as I recall, weight for the older belt-head machine is 1,800 lbs for bare machine, no accessories mounted.

pps; for 300 bucks, you can get a VSD (variable-speed drive) control for the motor (Google 'AC Tech' etc.); which will give you something like 20% to 200% of the listed RPM for each belt-setting; without moving belts. This works fine for any sort of light cuts.

However, if you're doing a cut which needs a large portion of the available HP, then you should move the belt so that you're getting the desired RPM at a VSD setting of 100% (i.e. normal 60hz to the motor).

A motor's HP output, and self-cooling ability, is dependent on it running at rated speed; i.e. 1725 rpm for typical 1-ph motors. If you use the VSD to run it at 10% of normal, it'll overheat if you try to pull full HP/torque out of it.

Have fun! A knee-mill, even a worn one, is going to add a whole new level of capability to your shop.
__________________
'69 IH D1100, '95 ZJ, '91 F350 diesel - ForSale: ZJ, Mazda MPV, MB ML320, MB c280

Last edited by d9d; 07-16-2006 at 01:03 AM.
d9d is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-17-2006, 01:06 PM   #21 (permalink)
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Member # 14629
Location: Mountain View, CA
Posts: 289
I helped move a similar sized JET vert mill. We ended up unbolting the head from the body to get it on the trailer. The cherry picker couldn't handle it as one piece. The only problem with doing it this way is now it needs to be trammed but it probabably needed it anyway.
gddyap is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-18-2006, 11:47 AM   #22 (permalink)
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Member # 73583
Location: Pittsburgh, Pa
Posts: 459
Send a message via AIM to peccavi18
My school just sold their worn out multi speed one for $50. It was beat after years of abuse by under trained and dumb students. I considered buying it just to sell for parts and scrap. Moving it was where I came into problems too. Figured it was to much work. Good buy though.
peccavi18 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-19-2006, 03:48 PM   #23 (permalink)
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Member # 74396
Posts: 127
As d9d implied it may be 3 phase!!

If so it will not run on residential single phase current, you will need a converter or VFD.
juanni is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-19-2006, 05:37 PM   #24 (permalink)
d9d
Wheeler
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Member # 20699
Location: SW Oregon
Posts: 190
Phase converter design/build info

Quote:
Originally Posted by juanni
As d9d implied it may be 3 phase!!

If so it will not run on residential single phase current, you will need a converter or VFD.
Yup.

And with VFD's so far down in price over the past 10 years, while caps have gone way UP in price; it makes sense to buy a VFD instead of building a converter.

UNLESS...you've already got the caps; or can scrounge them dirt-cheap or free. If so, and you don't need speed-control, here's a page with enough info to walk you through designing and building a rotary phase-converter...

http://www.oregonstone.com/ph-conv.htm
__________________
'69 IH D1100, '95 ZJ, '91 F350 diesel - ForSale: ZJ, Mazda MPV, MB ML320, MB c280
d9d is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-23-2006, 09:17 PM   #25 (permalink)
JR
Hornblower
 
JR's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Member # 8524
Location: La Crescenta, CA
Posts: 4,470
Quote:
Originally Posted by d9d
Yup.

And with VFD's so far down in price over the past 10 years, while caps have gone way UP in price; it makes sense to buy a VFD instead of building a converter.

UNLESS...you've already got the caps; or can scrounge them dirt-cheap or free. If so, and you don't need speed-control, here's a page with enough info to walk you through designing and building a rotary phase-converter...

http://www.oregonstone.com/ph-conv.htm
I'm thinking about a VFD and wondering if it's going to be right for me.

The mill needs a few things, like a table gib (the ear is broke off).
Also the fine feed hand wheel is missing. Do I really want it?

I'm not sure if I want to get into making my own power converter, there's enough junk to do around here

Here's a pic of the mono rail delivery.
Attached Images
 
JR is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On



All times are GMT -7. The time now is 02:21 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.6
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0 ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.