55 Gallon Drum Woodstove-Anyone using them? - Pirate4x4.Com : 4x4 and Off-Road Forum
 
Pirate4x4.Com : 4x4 and Off-Road Forum  

Go Back   Pirate4x4.Com : 4x4 and Off-Road Forum > General Tech > Shop and Tools
Notices

Reply
 
Share Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 01-16-2008, 10:14 AM   #1 (permalink)
Registered User
 
Hillbilly's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2000
Member # 857
Location: Dickson TN
Posts: 917
55 Gallon Drum Woodstove-Anyone using them?

I've got an old, tiny wood stove currently in the my shop, that just doesn't cut it. It's appx. 18"W, 18" deep, by 24-30" long. You can imagine how qucik it fills up when getting a fire started. I've seen those kits online, where you convert 55 gallon drums to use for stoves. Here's a link from Northern Tool on Ebay
http://cgi.ebay.com/Vogelzang-Single...QQcmdZViewItem

Anybody using this? Pros, cons..... Just looking for something to replace what I've got now.

Thanks
Hillbilly is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-16-2008, 10:26 AM   #2 (permalink)
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Member # 8916
Location: KC MO
Posts: 368
My experience is that they are not very good at giving you a controlled heat output. They are not very air tight so fires tend to run away if you overload them. They also rust out fairly quickly. In the middle of a cold barn where it's just roaring away you'll probably be happy until you run out of fuel. You would be better off finding one of free compressor tanks that many here seem to scrounge and then build a nice cylindrical stove that you will at least get a few years out of. The biggest single thing you can do to increase the useful heat output of any wood stove is to use outside air for combustion and these barrel stove kits are not designed to do that.
JG
roverjohn is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old 01-16-2008, 11:27 AM   #3 (permalink)
D60
Zeus of the Sluice
 
D60's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Member # 6398
Location: CO
Posts: 3,657
Yes, I've used one for several years. Love it for my shop.

I don't have much experience w wood stoves, so maybe it is hard to regulate, I dunno. Works great for me. Heats my insulated 40x50x14 (19' at peak) pretty darn well, even if it's single digits outside. Does better if you get a fire started during the day when it ain't so cold, rather than starting at night to burn off the chill in an already-very-cold shop, but I'm thinking that's just a fact of heating with ANY wood stove.

I love the fact that it uses recycled materials, plenty of space for longer pieces of wood or scrap dimensional, and the price just can't be beat. Have had mine since at least '03 (in two different shops), no rust problem but it's pretty damn dry here in Colo. I threw some sand in the bottom and put some expanded steel over that so I can shovel out ashes w/out shoveling out the sand. No sign that it's gonna burn thru the bottom anytime soon.

I use the double barrel kit and would recommend spending the few extra bucks for that.

I tried to find pics but don't have any. Best I could find was a mention of my homebrew wall thimble, which really doesn't pertain specifically to barrel stoves at all. FWIW, the thimble works great and I crank the stove all the time:
http://www.pirate4x4.com/forum/showp...16&postcount=8

Given how cheap the barrel stoves are and how much heat they pump out, I don't understand why anyone would use a conventional wood stove *for a shop* unless it was given to them or purchased for a very, very low price.

EDIT: I also use a Magic Heat heat exchanger. All this stuff is available from Northern.
__________________
You know it gets better, so of course it gets worse.

Last edited by D60; 01-16-2008 at 05:37 PM.
D60 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-16-2008, 11:40 AM   #4 (permalink)
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Member # 48682
Location: ATL GA
Posts: 1,392
We have a double-barrel one at the hunting camp - works great to heat a approx 20'x25' shack. We "regulate temp" by cracking the front door to the shack open if it gets too hot.

The single barrel ones are much easier to get a fire started in (better draft).

If it's burning for extended periods of time - double barrel is better because they put out more heat and conserve firewood better.
If it's only burning for a couple hours at a time - single barrel in better because they're faster to get going.
BumpyDodge is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-18-2008, 04:59 AM   #5 (permalink)
Registered User
 
Hillbilly's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2000
Member # 857
Location: Dickson TN
Posts: 917
Well I think I'm gonna give this a shot. Not gonna be out much, if I'm not happy with the results. Thanks men


hillbilly
Hillbilly is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-18-2008, 07:13 AM   #6 (permalink)
Pirate4x4 Addict!
 
Mechanos's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Member # 6704
Location: Roosterville, Missouri
Posts: 7,030
I've seen a "fancy" model of the double barrel stove where the top barrel had an array of heat exchanger tubes running the length of the barrel. A fan with a shroud was attached to the rear of the top barrel and forced air through the heat exchanger tubes. Hell, if you got real fancy, you could attach a plenum to the front of the top barrel and run some ducts to different areas of the shop to help disperse the heat better. An end view of the top barrel looks something like this:
Attached Images
 
__________________
It's
IHeavy
aka TORC
KC0UIC
-.- -.-. ----- ..- .. -.-.

Nothing is foolproof to a sufficiently talented fool.
Mechanos is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-18-2008, 07:16 AM   #7 (permalink)
Pirate4x4 Addict!
 
Mechanos's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Member # 6704
Location: Roosterville, Missouri
Posts: 7,030
Also, the forced air idea allows you to place the stove over in a corner or something and still get heat at the far end of the shop. Could help save on floor space.
__________________
It's
IHeavy
aka TORC
KC0UIC
-.- -.-. ----- ..- .. -.-.

Nothing is foolproof to a sufficiently talented fool.
Mechanos is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-18-2008, 10:21 AM   #8 (permalink)
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Member # 8916
Location: KC MO
Posts: 368
Don't bother with duct work unless the heater is heating more than one room. An open fan, like a ceiling fan, is far more efficient at circulating air.
roverjohn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-18-2008, 09:55 PM   #9 (permalink)
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Member # 68607
Location: Cadiz, Ky
Posts: 203
wish you would have posted earlier. i just gave away a double barrel about 3 weeks ago and im only about 50 miles away.

anyway, they work pretty good and are cheap. the barrels last longer than you would think. an ol-timer at the local radiator shop used one for 16 years with the original barrels (so he says). i had mine for 6 years with the same barrels. they are not like a trash burning barrell where they need replacing a few times a year. i suppose keeping them "inside" may attribute to them lasting longer and really in this area you only need heat for 3-4 months of the year. i would buy another one, if i had a shop and needed heat.
__________________
87 chevy reg cab/flat bed dually. tpi 350, 465/205, 60F/14b w/3:73.
myojunk is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-19-2008, 03:23 PM   #10 (permalink)
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Member # 68661
Posts: 105
If you're not happy with the heat, think heatsink. You'll notice a big difference with some fins between those barrels. Also, rocks are good at absorbing heat and radiating it back over time. Just a thought for you guys who aren't getting enough out of your drums...
silvrjeepr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-24-2008, 03:12 AM   #11 (permalink)
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Member # 62990
Posts: 26
I have had a couple of them throughout the years. My last employer heated the shop with one. I use the one I have (dbl barrel) to heat a large hunting tent. Both were Vogelzang components. They work well for what they are.

To make the burn barrel last alot longer, dump a large bag of cat litter or oil sorb in the bottom. The clay will insulate the steel from the really high temps.

We used a top barrel that has the removable lid. We used an idea kind of like mechanos idea above, but were able to put loops of tube inside ( because of the lid). I believe the tube/pipe we used was 4'' and blew through it with a squirrel cage type blower.
dunenutt is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-24-2008, 07:13 PM   #12 (permalink)
D60
Zeus of the Sluice
 
D60's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Member # 6398
Location: CO
Posts: 3,657
I popped some shots of my setup today. I know this isn't rocket science but I love these stoves 'cause they're so cheap and so easily modified.

An overall of my setup:


During the move we were too rough w it and one of the hinges broke. I pre-heated, cranked the heat on the MIG, crossed my fingers, and welded it up. It's been great. You might note the pin on that hinge broke so I dropped in a machine screw.


When I first built up the lower barrel several years ago, all I had was a barrel w a removeable lid. This was a just-get-it-done-today project, so I welded up all around the lid. IIRC all I had on hand was .035 wire and I burned thru a lot, so I had to do short beads. It's held up just fine all this time. Note the D44 fill plug which happened to fit the bung just a little further in.


When I added the upper barrel, there was a hole which I didn't have a cap for. So I grabbed a junk driveshaft, cut it down and welded it over LOL. Something in the barrel fitting caused this to weld strange, thus the heavy bead.


Call it ugly, call it redneck.............I call if functional (and I prefer "white trash"). The stove flat out works well. I had it going today and used my newer Craftsman infrared gun; the hottest point on the lower barrel was 930, upper barrel 400.
__________________
You know it gets better, so of course it gets worse.
D60 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-04-2008, 10:17 AM   #13 (permalink)
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Member # 124740
Posts: 3
I konw its been a while since anyone has posted on this thread, but I need some help fast..

Hopefully you guys can help me with this....getting really frustrated.

Ok, I built my double barrel stove kit, look great. I built a rebar grate to go in it. I put a fan behind it to blow the heat to the rest of the shop.

The problem is that I cant seem to keep the fire going, do to lack of air I assume. then when I open the door to get air in, smoke comes rolling out and wont stop even after the fire is going well. I have approx. ten foot of pipe from the flue throught the wall to a T where i have a cap on the bottom to clean the chiminey out with, then the other side of the T goes up to the chiminey where I have mesh to keep the birds, etc out and then a cap to keep the water out.

Can some one please help me figure out how to keep the smoke out of the shop and get it going up through the chiminey? Thanks in advance.

Jon
landi250r is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-04-2008, 10:31 AM   #14 (permalink)
D60
Zeus of the Sluice
 
D60's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Member # 6398
Location: CO
Posts: 3,657
You're not pulling a draft. Your chimney's gotta be at least several feet above the peak of your bldg and/or surrounding trees. There's a simple rule of thumb for this, the 3/2/10 rule

A VERY quick google search netted this, you'll find TONS more online
http://www.canren.gc.ca/prod_serv/in...d=103&PgId=610
__________________
You know it gets better, so of course it gets worse.
D60 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-04-2008, 10:35 AM   #15 (permalink)
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Member # 8916
Location: KC MO
Posts: 368
I'm having a hard time picturing your set up because it sounds like you have a horizontal pipe coming off the stove which goes through a wall and then tees to vertical. If this is the case you wont have very much draft. You want the hot gasses to travel vertically for a while to build up a little inertia. If this is not the case it could be as simple as the prevailing wind causing a pressure differential between the interior of your shop and the point the flue gas exits thus negating the draft. Can you post a picture of your stove and flue? Barrel stoves typically draw way more air though the stove than they would ever need for combustion so a lack of flue draft is usually not a problem.

Last edited by roverjohn; 12-04-2008 at 10:36 AM.
roverjohn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-04-2008, 12:40 PM   #16 (permalink)
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2004
Member # 30266
Location: shenandoah valley, va
Posts: 534
pull the cap off the bottom of the t...
__________________
"I'm a horny engineer. I never joke about math or sex." - Walowitz - The Big Bang Theory.
bkfj55 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-04-2008, 07:30 PM   #17 (permalink)
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Member # 123597
Posts: 47
I am by no means a wood stove expert but how fine is the mesh? try takin that off see what happens
Loose07 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-04-2008, 10:48 PM   #18 (permalink)
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Member # 62420
Location: Canada Eh
Posts: 290
Another sweet mod to a wood stove is a cold air intake.

I drilled two holes in the back of the wood stove as low as I possibly could, then of course two holes through the wall, ran some heavy conduit as the piping and what a difference.

Now what this just did is now sucking air from outside the garage. So in theory I'm not burning as much air from the inside of the shop(air that I'm trying to heat), also it is not creating nearly the vacuum inside the shop so cold air is not being sucked through gaps around doors.

on a side note my blower fan behind the wood stove is two small computer fans hooked up to a 12v 500ma power supply from a old answering machine. you would be amazed how far away you can feel the breeze. a ceiling fan is going to get installed in the peak in the future, to blow some heat down.
driver351 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-05-2008, 05:10 AM   #19 (permalink)
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Member # 13342
Posts: 1,333
Quote:
Originally Posted by driver351 View Post
Another sweet mod to a wood stove is a cold air intake.

I drilled two holes in the back of the wood stove as low as I possibly could, then of course two holes through the wall, ran some heavy conduit as the piping and what a difference.

Now what this just did is now sucking air from outside the garage. So in theory I'm not burning as much air from the inside of the shop(air that I'm trying to heat), also it is not creating nearly the vacuum inside the shop so cold air is not being sucked through gaps around doors.

on a side note my blower fan behind the wood stove is two small computer fans hooked up to a 12v 500ma power supply from a old answering machine. you would be amazed how far away you can feel the breeze. a ceiling fan is going to get installed in the peak in the future, to blow some heat down.

Here's your ceiling fan: http://www.bigassfans.com/size_comp.php
Albin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-05-2008, 10:42 AM   #20 (permalink)
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Member # 124740
Posts: 3
Here you go









landi250r is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-05-2008, 11:49 AM   #21 (permalink)
I make websites!
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Member # 12429
Location: Rubicon Trail - CA
Posts: 10,316
Blog Entries: 9
you guys have a lot of room for those things
__________________
4x4 Product Reviews
Todd W is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-05-2008, 11:56 AM   #22 (permalink)
Pirate4x4 Addict!
 
Mechanos's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Member # 6704
Location: Roosterville, Missouri
Posts: 7,030
Hard to tell without seeing the pitch of the roof, but it looks to me like it doesn't stick up high enough. I'd extend the flue pipe up about 2 to 3 more feet.
__________________
It's
IHeavy
aka TORC
KC0UIC
-.- -.-. ----- ..- .. -.-.

Nothing is foolproof to a sufficiently talented fool.
Mechanos is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-08-2008, 12:10 PM   #23 (permalink)
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Member # 124740
Posts: 3
ok, thanks to you guys I got it figured out. First cut a hole on each end of the bottom barrel to let more air in, then I took the cap off of the botto of the T. I started a fire and all seemed good. I went outside to check the stack and almost all of the smoke was coming out the bottom of the T...bad... I was about to tear the whole thing down and run it through the roof when I remembered the question about the mesh. So I decided to check it just to be sure. Sure enough the mesh was full of creosote. I guess all of the times I tried to get a fire started filled it up with creosote. I removed the mesh....and good to go. Thanks to Loose07 for the mesh question. Hopefully a birdy doesnt try to nest in the stack...could be trouble for them...
landi250r is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-11-2008, 07:53 AM   #24 (permalink)
Pirate4x4 Addict!
 
Mechanos's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Member # 6704
Location: Roosterville, Missouri
Posts: 7,030
Anyone done and "performance mods" to their barrel stoves? I'm not talking about an off the shelf heat exchanger for the flue pipe. I'm more interested in custom stuff like adding thermal mass, custom heat exchangers for the top barrel, outside combustion air, etc.

Post up what you've done.
__________________
It's
IHeavy
aka TORC
KC0UIC
-.- -.-. ----- ..- .. -.-.

Nothing is foolproof to a sufficiently talented fool.
Mechanos is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-11-2008, 12:47 PM   #25 (permalink)
Dana 44 Polisher
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Member # 13731
Location: Newberg, OR
Posts: 3,421
Quote:
Originally Posted by landi250r View Post
ok, thanks to you guys I got it figured out. First cut a hole on each end of the bottom barrel to let more air in, then I took the cap off of the botto of the T. I started a fire and all seemed good. I went outside to check the stack and almost all of the smoke was coming out the bottom of the T...bad... I was about to tear the whole thing down and run it through the roof when I remembered the question about the mesh. So I decided to check it just to be sure. Sure enough the mesh was full of creosote. I guess all of the times I tried to get a fire started filled it up with creosote. I removed the mesh....and good to go. Thanks to Loose07 for the mesh question. Hopefully a birdy doesnt try to nest in the stack...could be trouble for them...

My inlaws had the same problem on there cabin. You'd open the door on the wood stove and it would start sucking the smoke into the cabin... We tried everything inside. I ended up climbing up on the roof - shoveling the snow off to get to the chimney and finding the chimney cover mesh fully chocked in cresote... Tossed it off the roof and the woodstove worked like a champ.
uglyscout is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On



All times are GMT -7. The time now is 05:02 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.6
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0 ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.