Knurling tools - Pirate4x4.Com : 4x4 and Off-Road Forum
 
Pirate4x4.Com : 4x4 and Off-Road Forum  

Go Back   Pirate4x4.Com : 4x4 and Off-Road Forum > General Tech > Shop and Tools
Notices

Reply
 
Share Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 12-07-2010, 04:11 PM   #1 (permalink)
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Member # 29644
Location: Gypsum, Colorado
Posts: 151
Send a message via AIM to 71Dauntless
Knurling tools

I'm looking to pick up my first knurling tool to use on our lathe at work. This will not get used on a regular basis, mainly just for my personal projects. Chinese made is fine with me as long as it works.

Do I want a scissor or bump type tool? Also any tips or trips for a beginner would be appreciated!
__________________
1971 CJ5
2006 Toyota Tundra
71Dauntless is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-07-2010, 06:31 PM   #2 (permalink)
Granite Guru
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Member # 105383
Location: Louisville, KY
Posts: 718
Scissor type is considered better, esp for a light lathe.

I have both bump and scissor from enco, and for what little I do, the scissor is better.

Practical Machinist or Home Shop Machinist will have plenty of info.

Quick Google:

http://www.proshoppublishing.com/articles_knurling.html
__________________
RLC Welding and Fabrication

Louisville, KY


(502)403-6832


Winch bumpers for 73-98 Full size Chevy, 87-97 Ford F-series, Bronco, Ford Explorer and Rangers, Jeep xj and zj, Nissan xterra, and MORE!
jamscal is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old 12-07-2010, 07:13 PM   #3 (permalink)
D60
Zeus of the Sluice
 
D60's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Member # 6398
Location: CO
Posts: 3,585
Yeah I've used both but generally prefer scissor. I got the "USA" one from Enco, roughly $80 for the smaller option IIRC. I just didn't trust the import version, in fact never used one. And it's not like $80 is a ridiculous amount of coin. This same version survived quite well when I was in trade school, and it had been used by hundreds of students before me.

edit: doubted my figures so looked at Enco. I was wrong, looks like the imports are $80, so I forked out for the $200 model, but I'm sure I used a 20% code or something.
__________________
You know it gets better, so of course it gets worse.

Last edited by D60; 12-07-2010 at 07:16 PM.
D60 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-08-2010, 08:21 AM   #4 (permalink)
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Member # 17042
Location: Huntsville, Alabama
Posts: 719
Blog Entries: 1
Quote:
Originally Posted by jamscal View Post
Scissor type is considered better, esp for a light lathe.

I have both bump and scissor from enco, and for what little I do, the scissor is better.

Practical Machinist or Home Shop Machinist will have plenty of info.

Quick Google:

http://www.proshoppublishing.com/articles_knurling.html
Good article. I'll have to give this a try. I was given some knurling tools a while back but never new how (or had a need to) use them.
__________________
[QUOTE=Myanarchy;9475039]maybe if more kids got involved in projects we'd have less kids living in projects:flipoff2:[/QUOTE]
76scoutman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-09-2010, 10:45 AM   #5 (permalink)
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Member # 75285
Location: Maricopa County, Arizona
Posts: 450
Quote:
Originally Posted by jamscal View Post

FWIW, that book they are selling "Machine Shop Trade Secrets" is a pretty damn good book, especially for a novice like myself. It has all kinds of cool trade tricks.
FugginZukin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-09-2010, 10:48 AM   #6 (permalink)
Registered User
 
blake0577's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Member # 164017
Location: Alabama
Posts: 79
i prefer the single female wheel type but to each his own. knurling is an art that takes some practice for sure
blake0577 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-09-2010, 11:48 AM   #7 (permalink)
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2000
Member # 191
Location: silicon valley
Posts: 2,523
using a steady rest, or live/dead center is a plus when knurling... I've only
used a bump type, but can imagine the scissor type going over center and
causing problems......

--Sherpa

always experiment on scrap to see just how it all works out before using it
on your final work piece and ruining it........
__________________
[QUOTE][i]Originally posted by LAME [/i]
[B]
The guys designing cages for the D9 dozer on your Christmas list are going about this a bit differently way then a few rednecks, too much beer, and a JD2:D [/B][/QUOTE]

SHERPA is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-09-2010, 12:19 PM   #8 (permalink)
Mr. Personality
 
Azzy2000's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2002
Member # 11869
Location: Yukon, OK
Posts: 4,402
Quote:
Originally Posted by FugginZukin View Post
FWIW, that book they are selling "Machine Shop Trade Secrets" is a pretty damn good book, especially for a novice like myself. It has all kinds of cool trade tricks.
x2

This is a great book.. I bought it a few months ago and have read through it twice already.
Azzy2000 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-09-2010, 02:03 PM   #9 (permalink)
D60
Zeus of the Sluice
 
D60's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Member # 6398
Location: CO
Posts: 3,585
Quote:
Originally Posted by SHERPA View Post
using a steady rest, or live/dead center is a plus when knurling... I've only
used a bump type, but can imagine the scissor type going over center and
causing problems......

--Sherpa
Just like anything else that's a matter of experience and proper setup. In school my instructor insisted the tool had to be perfectly square and on center, and the only option was 50rpm and .008 feed.

I've found it to be WAY more forgiving than that in every respect. If anything the touchiest thing IMO is how much to crank down on the nut to close the wheels against the work.

For things under, say, 3/4" OD I tend to prefer around 135rpm and .008. Others say you should run .020 to .050 feed. Drastic difference. I've tried the heavy feed rates up to .035 and it works, too.................but you gotta have those set screws on your toolholder CRANKED down.

We had to knurl seemingly everything in school....punches, hammer handles, knobs, levers.............the only good thing about it is that you can tell the layperson you hand-filed all those pretty little diamonds.

Everyone has their own technique and they all work.
__________________
You know it gets better, so of course it gets worse.
D60 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-21-2011, 04:03 PM   #10 (permalink)
D60
Zeus of the Sluice
 
D60's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Member # 6398
Location: CO
Posts: 3,585
Just got an email from Rutland. Sale on the import scissor tools, 0-2.125 is $18.99 and 2.125-4" is $31.85. Promo code OB113, item numbers 2334 1101 and 2334 1102.

Right now Enco lists these at $70.98 and $83.98, showing the larger one backordered.

I don't have the larger version and I'm tempted to order it, but I dunno if I'll ever use it.
__________________
You know it gets better, so of course it gets worse.
D60 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On



All times are GMT -7. The time now is 05:41 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.6
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0 ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.