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Old 09-12-2006, 01:40 PM   #1 (permalink)
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A340 Transmission issues and FAQs

Since I bought my 88' 4runner a few weeks ago, I have been having some periodic shifting problems with it. Its been getting worse as of late though, so I started looking for answers on the web. Anyway, take a look at what I have been able to find out and diagnose with the help of several sites and forums.
----------

My problems started about 3 weeks ago. One day on the way home from work, I pulled up to a stop light a few blocks from my house. When the light turned green, I hit the pedal and found that my automatic tranmission was stuck in 3rd gear. I immediately turned into the closet parking lot fearing the worst. To boot, my OD light was blinking at me. Quickly, I shifted it into park. Then went ahead and tried it again and it shifted normally. Well, each of the next two days it happened in the exact same spot, but any other time. But, since then it is now becoming for apparent. So, I immediately decided that I needed to find out what was going on.

After searching online for pretty much a full day this is what I have come up with. The A340 uses three solenoids that help control the shift points on the transmission. These solenoids can go bad over time causing the tranny to shift erratically, or in my case not at all. Other areas of concern include the Vehicle Speed Sensor(there actually two of these), and the Throttle Position Sensor. During my research I came across several websites that provide a wealth of knowledge that is needed when trying to diagnose these problems.

By far, the most helpful is the following website that will allow you to open certain sections of the FSM regarding these transmissions.

http://personal.utulsa.edu/~nathan-b...autotrans.html

Also keep in mind that the A340 transmission is basically the same the AW4 that is found in Jeep Cherokees, so one would think that these FSM pages would also work for those people having issues with their AW4s.

AFAIK, the following transmission codes represent what tranny you have.

*A340F are found in 4wd 4runners and trucks that have the 2.4L 22RE 4cyl motors.
*A340H are found in 4wd 4runners and trucks that have the 3.0L 3VZ-E
V6 motors.
*A340E are found in 2wd 4runners and trucks that have the 3.0L 3VZ-E V6 motors.

All of these(except the 2wd versions) have an integrated chain driven transfer case that gives a 2.56:1 gear reduction in 4lo.

For Basic Troubleshooting of these transmissions go here:
http://personal.utulsa.edu/~nathan-b...43basictro.pdf

And for General troubleshooting of these transmissions go here:
http://personal.utulsa.edu/~nathan-b...ralt.pdf<br />

Directions for pulling codes for the "Overdrive" light on the center console:
http://personal.utulsa.edu/~nathan-b...45diagnosi.pdf

Translating the Codes:
[blue]Code 42[/blue]: Defective No.1 vehicle speed sensor(in combination meter) - severed wire harness or short circuit
[blue]Code 61[/blue]: Defective No.2 vehicle speed sensor(in ATM) - severed wire harness or short circuit
[blue]Code 62[/blue]: Severed No.1 solenoid or short circuit - severed wire harness or short circuit
[blue]Code 63[/blue]: Severed No.2 solenoid or short circuit - severed wire harness or short circuit
[blue]Code 64[/blue]: Severed lock-up solenoid or short circuit - severed wire harness or short circuit

In order to reset the Diagnostic trouble code, remove the MFI fuse located on the passenger side inner fender:



A/T Shift Schedule


During my search, I was also able to locate a couple of sources for much cheaper replacement Solenoids for the A340. Considering that Toyota charges upwards of $150/ea for these, this is a bargain. You want kit #97420K below:

http://www.bulkpart.com/Merchant2/me...solenoid<br />

Or, you can contact:
Axiom Automotive Technologies
1360 Ingleside Rd.
Norfolk, VA 23502
800-622-6997
(kit#97420K)

I believe these solenoids to be my major malfunction in my own A340 transmission and will be ordering a kit myself to install in my tranny. Also keep in mind that this install can be done while the tranny is still in the vehicle. It is a good idea to replace the fluid and filter at the same time.

Good luck with your diagnosis!



Dual Transfer case options for the A340.

There is really only one option for getting a dual case setup behind the A340 tranmission to date.

Inchworm makes the only adapter available for the A340.

Taken from Inchworm's site:
[red]"It allows the use of Inchworm Double Transfer Case Adapters and Geared Cases behind factory automatic transmissions. Clockability allows stock rotation or up 10 degrees for added ground clearance. This adapter requires the use of a 23 spline input shaft.

This adapter does require a complete tear down of the factory automatic transfer case as well as some small part changing inside the transmission. Installation is available." [/red]

Link to their site
http://www.inchwormgear.com/store/pr...products_id=86

You will also need their 23 spline input shaft(which is a great upgrade anyway).
http://www.inchwormgear.com/store/pr...products_id=33

Then from there you can take your pick of using which gearing with the dual cases you would like.


Transfer Case options for the A340

While Toyota Tcase options are limited behind the A340, there is one more option that may appeal to you.

Jeep AW4s are basically the same at the A340, but with one major difference. They DO NOT have an integrated transfer case like the A340 does. The AW4 also has the removable bellhousing, so you can bolt a Toyota bellhousing to the AW4 for use in a Toyota chassis. So, that means that if you used the Jeep AW4 in a toyota, you have the option of going with other transfer cases. Two of which are the Dana 300, and the Atlas II transfer cases. Both of these cases offer a twin stick option to allow yourself the ability to disengage the front and rear axles for use on the trail. The Dana 300 offers a 2.62:1 gearing reduction in stock form, or the ability to get a 4:1 gearing option with either TeraLow gears from Teraflex or LowMax gears from Novak Adapters. The Atlas II offers the option of 3.0:1, 3.8:1, 4.3:1, or 5:1 sets.

The Dana 300 option would require a 5/8" spacer that you can buy from Novak Adapters. This adapter also allows you to clock the Dana 300 almost flat for more ground clearance. It also gives you the option of not needing to pull the rear driveshaft when flat towing, because the output bearing would now be riding in the gear oil in the Tcase.
Link to adapter with Novak:
http://www.novak-adapt.com/catalog/kit_153_aw4.htm

AFAIK, there is no adapter required when using the Atlas transfer case with the Jeep AW4.
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Last edited by JeepinCJ7; 09-25-2006 at 10:55 AM.
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Old 01-14-2008, 07:13 PM   #2 (permalink)
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If you don't mind I'd like to add some info to this already great post. I've gone through some issues of my own and done a lot of research too.

I think the A340H also comes behind 4cyls too, that's what my 87 had.

Features of the A340H transmission:
The throttle position cable controls the line pressure only, it does not affect shift points. Shift points are determined by throttle position information from the TPS sensor on the throttle body.
Thus it is easy to perform a free shift kit just by adjusting the cable tighter or even disconnecting it and fixing it to a wide open throttle position.
Electronically controlled shifting. When the computer detects a mechanical or speed sensor problem, it goes into a "limp home" or failsafe mode. It will defaut into 3rd gear (direct drive) and the OD light will flash.
It is also easy to covert to a 'full manually controlled" state with a simple electrical control unit, that can easily be switched between fully auto and fully manual shift control.
"ECT" button can select normal or 'power' mode. When in power mode the shift points are raised approx. 500rpm and the torque converter clutch will not lock up (see overheating below).

Features that are unique to the Toyota Chain driven Auto T-case:
A340H model has a 2.66 to 1 low range.
Parking pawl located in transfer case, not in the tranny like most vehicles.
Has it's own pan, valve body, servo, and clutch pack that are fed fluid from the trans pump.
Transfer case is hydraulically actuated, high or low range will not engage without pressurized ATF.
Valvebody is electronically controlled by #4 soleniod, located in small pan below reduction case.
Has two separate fluid cavities, the reduction cavity and the chain drive cavity.
Shares ATF with the tranny *in the reduction unit only* the chain drive has it's own fluid cavity that uses ATF and has traditional drain and fill plugs.
Utilizes planetary gears for reduction.
Front and rear outputs are a large 23 spline, flanges do not interchange with geardrive cases.
Does not have a neutral range.
Can safely shift from 2-hi to 4-hi at speeds up to 60mph.

Why are vehicles with the Toyota A340H trans/t-case so gutless?
(Compared to their 5 speed counterparts with the same motor). Normally, an auto tranny both consumes power and mutiplies torque. In the case of the A340H, the power consumption is doubled by the addition of the hydraulic transfer case, which is essentially like having another automatic transmission inline. But the torque multiplication of the single torque converter isn't enough to compensate for the additional drag. A simple though exspensive solution is to replace the hydraulic chain driven transfer case with a gear driven one. Inchworm and Gearslug are some of the only vendors that make an adapter for this application. People who have performed this mod report increased mileage and performance, most likely due to the elimination of the additional drag of the hydraulic t-case. Note that the chain drive case has a 2.66 to 1 low range so going to a single stock gear drive case will lose some gear reduction.

Common issues with the A340H
Overheating at highway speeds (A/T temp light comes on). Most of the heat generated within an automatic transmission comes from the torque converter, but is virtually eliminated when the coverter is equipped with a torque converter clutch lockup. The A340 torque converter contains a lockup clutch and is of a high stall design. These features are designed to work together to increase power and improve MPG at highway speeds. The 3.0L version is a very high stall, 2800rpm. The higher the stall, the more heat is generated. It is important that the coverter stay locked up while cruising at highway speeds. The torque converter will unlock when the ECM senses that the motor is bogging down and needs the torque multiplication from the unlocked converter clutch (when locked up there is no multiplication) to keep speed, such as on a hill. Due to the narrow powerband and lethargic output of the 3.0, the TCC needs to unlock at the slightest increase in load. Add a heavy 4runner body and the problem is worse. Is most cases of overheating trans fluid, the TCC unlocks while cruising at highway speeds and does not lock back up for extended periods of time. The stock trans cooling system cannot disperse this increased amount of heat for more than a short period of time. An aftermarket 'plate and fin' style trans cooler will take care of this.

Fluid overflowing out the breather- This can be caused by several different conditions, or a combination of them.
Heat expansion due to overheating-see paragraph above.
Overfilled fluid level. Later models have a two peice dipstick tube. If the upper tube is installed incorrectly or missing bolts that fix it in place, it will not fully mate with the lower tube, causing the dipstick to sit too shallow in the pan. This can cause the transmission to be as much a 4 quarts overfilled when seen as correct on the dipstick, and is a fire hazard as the vent is near the catalytic converter.
Overfilled on purpose for high angle offroad use-don't get crazy here, one quart over will do it.

Pros and cons of Automatic transmissions in a trail rig
Personally, I feel that an auto will outperform a manual in every place offroad with one exception- when descending very steep hills or dropoffs. They do not need super low gearing to perform well, about 100 to 1 is considered by many to be optimal for rockcrawling an auto. They are much more forgiving to the rest of the driveline. They are clearly better in any situation where high wheel speeds are necessary like mud and sand. The reliability arguement can go either way. Yes a manual with a bad gear or clutch release can limp off the trail, but they are harder on the rest of drivetrain and if there is an issue with the clutch itself you're dead in the water. As long as you keep autos cool and full of clean ATF they will treat you right. One drawback is that they can't be bumpstarted. On the road, they tow better, and stop and go traffic isn't as much of a suckfest.

Auto Tranny wheeling notes-
Like said above, about 100 to 1 is optimal gearing for rockcrawling (incidentally, stock dual cases gets you right in the ballpark). Since stalling isn't an issue, the difference between stock lowrange (about 36 to 1) and something lower translates as easier throttle control/less unwanted wheelspin.

Bellhousing info-
Bellhousings for the 3VZE and 22RE can be swapped, but are specific to their respective torque converters. 22RE is about 2000rpm stall, 3VZE is 2800. There are six bolts attaching the torque converter to the flexplate. When installing a Toyota auto trans, note that one of these six bolts is different and has a small shoulder. Install this one first and it will align all the holes so you can fully tighten each one without having to turn over the motor twice.

Links
http://awshifting.com/
http://www.inchwormgear.com/store/

Last edited by SoCalWheeler71; 01-21-2008 at 05:23 PM.
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Old 01-15-2008, 07:27 PM   #3 (permalink)
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If the OD light is blinking, you have a code you can pull from the ECT unit. The solenoids can fail mechanically with no codes, the codes are only electrical problems. The very first thing to do is unplug the ECT, it's under the radio and do a manual shift. 1 will be 1st, 2 will be D, and D will be OD, you will not have 3, because the shift solenoids are disengaged. The accumulator seals can be worn causing pressure to drop.




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Old 01-15-2008, 10:53 PM   #4 (permalink)
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Marlin has been making an adapter for dual cases for the A340 since 2000 IIRC. Can't forget about the Gear Slug either.
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Old 01-16-2008, 08:42 AM   #5 (permalink)
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Quote:
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Marlin has been making an adapter for dual cases for the A340 since 2000 IIRC. Can't forget about the Gear Slug either.
Not unless they are using the Inchworm Adapter. He build one for the Tacoma, which is different. Gear Slug and Inchworm are the only two.

Its been a while since I wrote the FAQ on this. Even changed screen names since then. LOL

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Old 01-16-2008, 09:02 AM   #6 (permalink)
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Yeah I was gonna make a FAQ like this over on the Marlin forum but I found this so it seemed like a better place for it.
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Old 02-11-2008, 11:46 AM   #7 (permalink)
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So would the throttle position cable adjustment also control the pressure to the clutch pack that feeds power to the front drive line. I've adjusted my cable as per the tsm, but have noticed (or at least my spotter noticed) the the front drive line was chattering and not pulling in certain low rpm instances, the rears were spinning but not the front. The chain wasn't skipping.
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Old 02-11-2008, 12:33 PM   #8 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by Toyotaholics.com View Post
Not unless they are using the Inchworm Adapter. He build one for the Tacoma, which is different. Gear Slug and Inchworm are the only two.

It is a Marlin Crawler adapter. I did it in March 2000. To the best of my knowledge, I was the first. It is still on the trail today, although not quite as pretty

I had to swap in an A340F and wire it to work with the ECT for the A340H. The adapter plate was the same as one for another application, the V6-5sp plate, I think. He never really marketed the adapter kit. Not much interest back then. I think it's now being marketed to the Tacoma crowd because they already have the A340F auto. Inchworm's kit modifies an existing A340H, so it's a different product altogether.

Here's the article that was published on the build:
http://www.4x4wire.com/toyota/tech/autocrawler/
http://www.4x4wire.com/toyota/tech/a...ler/index2.htm

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Old 03-01-2008, 02:04 PM   #9 (permalink)
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Cool Gearing info-
4cyl Trucks and 4Runners that were originally equipped with an automatic trans came with a 4.30 axle ratio and 28" tires. 28 divided by 4.30 x 5.29 = 34.45. Most 35" tires are acutally 34.5" in diameter. If you regear from 4.30 to 5.29 and go to 35" tires your speedo will be accurate within 1 percent.

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Old 03-01-2008, 05:45 PM   #10 (permalink)
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You could always go with an aw4 from a late model jeep cherokee. It will bolt right up with the a340 bellhousing, and you have the choice of running an atlas or dana 300 tcase. That's the rout i'm going.
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Old 03-21-2008, 12:16 PM   #11 (permalink)
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Does anyone have a link to a A340 teardown/rebuild/upgrade how-to? I need to put a T100 output shaft into my Tacoma tranny so I can finish this stupid 3.4 swap
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Old 04-17-2009, 04:30 PM   #12 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JeepinCJ7;5898209
During my search, I was also able to locate a couple of sources for much cheaper replacement Solenoids for the A340. Considering that Toyota charges upwards of $150/ea for these, this is a bargain. You want kit #97420K below:

[url
http://www.bulkpart.com/Merchant2/merchant.mvc?Screen=CTGY&Store_Code=2&Category_Cod e=A340solenoid
[/url]

Or, you can contact:
Axiom Automotive Technologies
1360 Ingleside Rd.
Norfolk, VA 23502
800-622-6997
(kit#97420K)
.


Updated Link
http://www.makcotransmissionparts.com/97420K.html

Also, thanks for the info! Great to know these solenoids are available as a set for just a little more than one from Toyota! I sleep better at night now knowing that.
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Old 04-17-2009, 06:43 PM   #13 (permalink)
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This is some info I have gained from personal experiance and may not be 100% true.

All toyota trannys I have seen are labled 30-40-le regardless of aplication or if they are 4x4 or 2x4.

340h comes behind 22re and 3.0 v6./ Pass. drop./ Hydro transfer case./ Adapters from inchworm and possibly gearslug.

340f comes in 95+ tacos, t100s, tundras, sequia (spl?), and 4runners. Not sure if the 93-95 t100s are F or H but I have been told they are F. All are driver drop except for t100. I have heard the t100 are all pass. drop. It would be great if someone could confirm this. Some on this site have said they had an F in a 22re truck but I have not seen one in person or a picture./ T-case has gear oil instead of ATF./ Adapters from inch worm and marlin. The inch worm unit clocks in either direction. Not sure which way the marlin unit clocks but have heard it only goes one way. Either adapter is very easy to install. I have heard the adapter for the H is more difficult but have not done it myself.

340e refers to any 2wd 4speed. (Might not be true for early years.)/ prerunner adapter from inch worm allows a gear driven case. You can also use a tailhousing from an F tranny and use any adapter that will fit this. To do this you will need to swap in a 4wd output or cut down the 2wd putput as it is two long.

As far as I know you will need a 23 spline input on your gear driven transfer case to run behind any of these.
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Old 04-17-2009, 07:17 PM   #14 (permalink)
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Does anyone have a link to a A340 teardown/rebuild/upgrade how-to? I need to put a T100 output shaft into my Tacoma tranny so I can finish this stupid 3.4 swap
It is pretty easy and you don't need any special tools. Lay everything out in the order you take them out and you should be good.

You can press this out by threading two bolts in the threaded holes and tightening them down.



But you need to remove these bolts on the bottom first or you will ding the thing underneath it. Ask me how I know.



Other than that it is pretty strait forward. Lots of snap rings and it is a pain to get all the clutches lined up but not to bad.
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Old 04-17-2009, 10:08 PM   #15 (permalink)
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wow! lot's of good information. this helped clear the air for some ideas.

thank-you
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Old 04-20-2009, 02:29 AM   #16 (permalink)
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I remember in school this was the first transmission I tore down/rebuilt
I was horrified by the choice of mating the t-case the way they did.. just because I had to lift and carry 9 of them from storage to the bench.. and as a pair they are quite heavy after the 2nd or third in a row.. I know I still have a factory yota book on these somewhere so if i find it i'll try to share any useful bits. Maybe an application chart? good for diagnostics elsewhere but I have yet to have had one of these come through one of my shops... and mine has 230K miles and just switched to dex 6 (overall a better fluid that will last longer and resist breakdown much better in the case the trans gets too hot). anyways.. never have seen one go bad. Wouldnt mind hearing some about what usually goes first and so on (besides the soleniods).
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Old 05-14-2009, 06:55 AM   #17 (permalink)
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Stall RPM

I am still processing all this outstanding information; what is the stall rate of the torque converter in the 30-40LE or (A340E?)

If the high RPM stall (2800) in the A340H is a major factor for over heating would changing the torque converter to a lower rate say one that is 2000 rpm help the problem?

I just swapped the bell housing on my A340H to accommodate a 3RZ engine and was considering using the 30-40LE torque converter (transmission that came with engine) because there is a 3/8" difference in the two housings and torque converters (30-40LE being deeper). Would this cause me problems?
Thanks
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Old 05-14-2009, 07:24 AM   #18 (permalink)
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Some on this site have said they had an F in a 22re truck but I have not seen one in person or a picture./ T-case has gear oil instead of ATF.
I have one of those transmission/transfer cases and I also posted this pic a month ago in another thread.

I bought the setup sight unseen from a shop in town who called a yard in Spokane and told them I wanted a 22R/RE automatic setup and that's what I got. Looking at it I would says it's an A340F with a VF1A t-case. The serial numbers off of it say it's a '92-93 vintage according to the dealer.
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Old 05-14-2009, 04:38 PM   #19 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by tfrere View Post
I am still processing all this outstanding information; what is the stall rate of the torque converter in the 30-40LE or (A340E?)

If the high RPM stall (2800) in the A340H is a major factor for over heating would changing the torque converter to a lower rate say one that is 2000 rpm help the problem?

I just swapped the bell housing on my A340H to accommodate a 3RZ engine and was considering using the 30-40LE torque converter (transmission that came with engine) because there is a 3/8" difference in the two housings and torque converters (30-40LE being deeper). Would this cause me problems?
Thanks
The high stall converter creates a lot of heat when the TCC is not locked up. It is an issue because the stock trans cooling system can not keep up with it. The simple soloution is to put a decent sized aftermarket trans cooler on it. I don't think there is a cheap way to lower the stall, the depths of the coverters and bellhousings are different and specific to each "paired" setup, you may be able to find an aftermarket TC but that will likely cost around $1500 or more. Why not use the TC from the 3RZ? It will be well suited to the powerband of that motor, Toyota does pretty good R&D on their own stuff.

EDIT- after reading your post again I think you are asking if the TC from the 3RZ will fit the A340H pump. I'm not sure, you'll need to compare the TC's and pumps to see if they interchange. If there is a difference you may be able to swap the pumps, but IMO you are better off using the trans that came with the 3RZ and adapting a gear drive case onto the back of it. For a number of reasons:
The wiring/sensors are different
The newer trans is stronger, more effiecient, more reliable
It will be more reliable if you don't open it up and start swapping stuff out
You will get the better t-case that can be doubled or more easily adapted to a geared case.

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Old 05-14-2009, 06:31 PM   #20 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by the 38 special View Post
I remember in school this was the first transmission I tore down/rebuilt
I was horrified by the choice of mating the t-case the way they did.. just because I had to lift and carry 9 of them from storage to the bench.. and as a pair they are quite heavy after the 2nd or third in a row.. I know I still have a factory yota book on these somewhere so if i find it i'll try to share any useful bits. Maybe an application chart? good for diagnostics elsewhere but I have yet to have had one of these come through one of my shops... and mine has 230K miles and just switched to dex 6 (overall a better fluid that will last longer and resist breakdown much better in the case the trans gets too hot). anyways.. never have seen one go bad. Wouldnt mind hearing some about what usually goes first and so on (besides the soleniods).
I'm sure I'm going to screw up the terminology but, I broker one. It's behind a 3.4 from a 2000 4 Runner with 109,000 miles. Auto, 2wd unit with Inchworm adapter and duals. The spot welds on the reverse drum broke. Worked fine going forward. Drive down the expressway at 80 mph, just couldn't go backwards.
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Old 05-14-2009, 06:33 PM   #21 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by dniel View Post
This is some info I have gained from personal experiance and may not be 100% true.

All toyota trannys I have seen are labled 30-40-le regardless of aplication or if they are 4x4 or 2x4.

340h comes behind 22re and 3.0 v6./ Pass. drop./ Hydro transfer case./ Adapters from inchworm and possibly gearslug.

340f comes in 95+ tacos, t100s, tundras, sequia (spl?), and 4runners. Not sure if the 93-95 t100s are F or H but I have been told they are F. All are driver drop except for t100. I have heard the t100 are all pass. drop. It would be great if someone could confirm this. Some on this site have said they had an F in a 22re truck but I have not seen one in person or a picture./ T-case has gear oil instead of ATF./ Adapters from inch worm and marlin. The inch worm unit clocks in either direction. Not sure which way the marlin unit clocks but have heard it only goes one way. Either adapter is very easy to install. I have heard the adapter for the H is more difficult but have not done it myself.

340e refers to any 2wd 4speed. (Might not be true for early years.)/ prerunner adapter from inch worm allows a gear driven case. You can also use a tailhousing from an F tranny and use any adapter that will fit this. To do this you will need to swap in a 4wd output or cut down the 2wd putput as it is two long.

As far as I know you will need a 23 spline input on your gear driven transfer case to run behind any of these.
The Inchworm adapter is available in 21 or 23 spline.
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Old 05-14-2009, 08:48 PM   #22 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by 85andstillrunnin View Post
The Inchworm adapter is available in 21 or 23 spline.
Really? Last I heard they were only available in 23. I think it would soften the financial blow and open up his market if he offered it in 21, but I think he doesn't because of the strength issue. Are you referring to the Prerunner adapter or the 340H adapter Dan?

EDIT- Ok I just looked at the IW site, looks like the Prerun is available in a bunch of configurations, 21 or 23; and the 340H adapeter is now available in 21 also. Nice.

Last edited by SoCalWheeler71; 05-14-2009 at 08:54 PM.
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Old 05-14-2009, 09:11 PM   #23 (permalink)
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Really? Last I heard they were only available in 23. I think it would soften the financial blow and open up his market if he offered it in 21, but I think he doesn't because of the strength issue. Are you referring to the Prerunner adapter or the 340H adapter Dan?

EDIT- Ok I just looked at the IW site, looks like the Prerun is available in a bunch of configurations, 21 or 23; and the 340H adapeter is now available in 21 also. Nice.
I have a 21 spline Prereunner adapter in my truck. I was too broke to change over to the 23 spline when I did the motor swap. I've had mine for a year now.
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Old 05-17-2009, 03:17 AM   #24 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by SoCalWheeler71 View Post
The high stall converter creates a lot of heat when the TCC is not locked up. It is an issue because the stock trans cooling system can not keep up with it. The simple soloution is to put a decent sized aftermarket trans cooler on it. I don't think there is a cheap way to lower the stall, the depths of the coverters and bellhousings are different and specific to each "paired" setup, you may be able to find an aftermarket TC but that will likely cost around $1500 or more. Why not use the TC from the 3RZ? It will be well suited to the powerband of that motor, Toyota does pretty good R&D on their own stuff.

EDIT- after reading your post again I think you are asking if the TC from the 3RZ will fit the A340H pump. I'm not sure, you'll need to compare the TC's and pumps to see if they interchange. If there is a difference you may be able to swap the pumps, but IMO you are better off using the trans that came with the 3RZ and adapting a gear drive case onto the back of it. For a number of reasons:
The wiring/sensors are different
The newer trans is stronger, more effiecient, more reliable
It will be more reliable if you don't open it up and start swapping stuff out
You will get the better t-case that can be doubled or regreared.
I swapped to DEX 6 from DEX 3..
Its a full synthetic that maintains viscosity at higher and lower temps
It can handle a lot higher and lower temps before breaking down, for much longer
Its just flat out better fluid.

My trans runs a lot cooler and shifts a little better as well.
Make sure your trans is in good enough shape to handle the detergents that come with any fluid change though.
You can find info about that elsewhere. I don't feel up to writing thhhhaaat much right now.

If your towing consistently or 4wheeling your rig for long periods (its strenuous and causes head buildup with minimal dissipation)
then swap out your cooler for a bigger one or go all out and get the B&M cooler with a stand alone fan and install a temp sensor in the pan of your trans like for a gauge - but to trigger the fan for the trans cooler. That will insure you never have an issue with it over heating, with the exception of completely degraded trans fluid which = slipping aka burnt up clutch packs.

An issue 4wheeling is that there is no airflow over the trans cooler. In my truck it is right next to the transmission between it and the pass side frame rail. no air flow 4wheeling and it gets muddy thus insulating it and murdering any chance of heat transfer.
That is why I suggest one with a stand alone electric fan. That or mount it up infront of your radiator like I do with everything else.. But that still has its downsides if you really run your rig hard .. but also costs much much less (the fan and temp circuit jump up the price a bit)...
If you add a cooler if your not worried about the stock one under the truck (if you have one there - it may be just a second cooler as a part of a tow package from the factory/dealer) getting ripped off and leaving you screwed then just add your new one in line to that one.

But the DEX 6 is a good place to start. At least replace your old fluid with new DEX 3 at the minimum.
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Old 05-17-2009, 03:24 AM   #25 (permalink)
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It is pretty easy and you don't need any special tools. Lay everything out in the order you take them out and you should be good.

You can press this out by threading two bolts in the threaded holes and tightening them down.



But you need to remove these bolts on the bottom first or you will ding the thing underneath it. Ask me how I know.



Other than that it is pretty strait forward. Lots of snap rings and it is a pain to get all the clutches lined up but not to bad.
is that a machete? next to an open transmission? whats with the dust broom? lol just such an odd mixture of things on that bench
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