Rear Bumper

Heavy Duty Rear bumper with receiver and swing-out tire / tool rack

Intro. I wanted to create the "ULTIMATE" rear bumper / swing-out spare carrier combo.

Here are the specs:

- All 1/4" and 3/16" steel construction

- Built-in air tank

- Built-in 2" Class 3 receiver

- Built-in Clevis shackle tow-points

- Swing-out carrier capable of supporting over 200 lbs.

Carrier configured for:
- up to 33X12.5R15 spare
- 2 20-litre NATO Gerry cans
- 48" Hi-Lift jack mount
- Shovel mount
First - since I plan to yank and tow from the bumper - the mounting has to be secure...REALLY REALLY secure!!

So I used 1/4" steel plates mounted along the frame rails and attached with 5/8" Grade-8 bolts and lock nuts passing through the entire frame rail and a 1/8" reinforcement plate welded to the outside of the frame rails.

This is the raw steel for the mounting brackets.
Here are the slots cut in the rear cross member for mounting. Don't worry - the whole area will be reinforced.
Here's the area where the 1/4" mounting plates pass through the rear cross member. Note the reinforcement with 1/8" angle.
And here's the assembly bolted together, with the attached 90-degree 1/4" mounting plate, to which the actual bumper's bracket will be welded.
A slightly different view.
Here's one of the 1/8" frame rail mounting reinforcement plates...
...and a view of one  with the bumper mounting bracket bolted on the other side.
This is how the bumper will mount.

The inside face of the bumper will be welded to the outside face of the bracket that is bolted on here.
Here's another view. The part on the "outside" (i.e. bottom of the picture) will actually become a part of the bumper itself, as seen in the next shot...
Here's that bracket now welded onto the bumper itself, and reinforced of course!!
Another view.
A very early shot of the bumper itself with the mounting brackets welded on.

The bumper is 3" X 5" boxed steel 3/16" thick.
Here's a detailed shot of the receiver hitch and the air-tank manifold from behind.
Another shot from behind showing the brackets and the corner braces, which support the tail-light guards.
The finished thing from behind.
The finished thing showing the front and underside.
Finished installation mounting, shown from underneath, one side.

Note use of 8 5/8" Grade-8 bolts with locking nuts. Also, in top right of the photo you can see the bolts that attach the tail-light guards.
From underneath, showing air-hose attached to manifold.
Detail of swing-out carrier locking pin mechanism.

I used a hitch-style pin with retaining clip, and I used a valve spring to keep it all tight.
The finished empty swing-out carrier, uninstalled.

It has provision for up to a 33X12.50 spare, hi-lift jack, 2 20-litre Jerry cans, and 3 9mm waterproof lockable ammo cans that hold shackles, chain, tie-downs, bungees, tools etc.
The finished product, installed, with carrier open and empty.
Carrier loaded up and open.
The finished product.

Note the dual support for the carrier, because of the weight when it's all loaded up.

The tail-light guards survived me pounding them with the sledge hammer (my usual test).

Note that one of the Ammo cans actually obscures the right tail-light, so it will have to go.
Side view.
Final  view,
Summary:  Well, it's been over 3 years since I built the bumper and a few things have changed.  The air tank functionality had to be abandoned as I was just learning to weld when I built it, and didn't weld it air-tight.  I have also removed the swing out carrier.  It was quite heavy (I built it from material that was too thick and heavy) and a PITA to open and close all the time.  It was also a lot of weight back there, and as I began to do more technical rock crawling it was unwieldy.  I still have it in the shop and it can be used for more of an "expedition" type trip where the storage is useful.  The good news is it has held up extremely well to some serious abuse and some tough pulls, never failing me.

 

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