I'm not holding my breath - Pirate4x4.Com : 4x4 and Off-Road Forum
 
Pirate4x4.Com : 4x4 and Off-Road Forum  

Go Back   Pirate4x4.Com : 4x4 and Off-Road Forum > Miscellaneous > General Chit-Chat
Notices

Reply
 
Share LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 05-01-2017, 05:41 AM   #1 (permalink)
Zeus of the Sluice
 
Haole's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Member # 5859
Location: Here!
Posts: 108,056
Blog Entries: 1
I'm not holding my breath

Especially with the cold fusion debacle. Every article that I've read about this sounds like a press release by the company to generate more investment rather than a science based article. It would be nice if they get it to generate usable power.

https://nuclearstreet.com/nuclear_po...-plasma-042801

A privately funded company in Britain, Tokamak Energy, said Friday it had turned on its third reactor in five years, the ST40 fusion reactor, which has achieved its first plasma and has a goal of reaching 100 million degrees, far hotter than the center of the sun.

The ST40 is the third stage of a five-stage plan that aims to use fusion energy to contribute to the commercial grid by 2030, says the company which set a record of 29 hours of continuous plasma in 2015, using the company's second reactor, the ST25.

The company that grew out of the Culham Center for Fusion Energy, is based in Oxfordshire. It was established in 2009 for the purpose of designing and developing small fusion reactors that would be viable on a commercial basis.

“With the ST40 up and running, the next steps are to complete the commissioning and installation of the full set of magnetic coils which are crucial to reaching the temperatures required for fusion. This will allow the ST40 to a produce plasma temperature of 15 million degrees – as hot as the center of the sun,” said Tokamak. The goal is to reach that temperature by the fall of this year.

The company has a strategy of achieving milestones, then seeking new funding with the confidence that comes with success. Following the 15 million milestone, the company expects to forge ahead and reach 100 million degrees in 2018 – a record-breaking milestone for a privately owned and funded fusion reactor. Still "significant investment" is needed, said Dr. David Kingham, the company's chief executive officer.

The company said 100 million degrees was a vital target, as it is only above this temperature that charged particles that naturally repel can be forced together to induce the controlled fusion reaction. Subsequently, this is the necessary milestone for creating a commercially viable fusion power produced in a compact, spherical tokamak reactor.

The company said that in 17 years, it had already reached the half-way point of its plan to deliver fusion power. It is focused on working with a smaller reactor design – called a compact, spherical tokamak – that enables quicker development of devices, therefore speeding up the process towards achieving their ultimate targets: producing first electricity by 2025 and commercially viable fusion power by 2030. Tokamak Energy’s research has also proven that this route to fusion power can be much faster than the development of conventional large-scale tokamak devices.

“We are unveiling the first world-class controlled fusion device to have been designed, built and operated by a private venture. The ST40 is a machine that will show fusion temperatures – 100 million degrees – are possible in compact, cost-effective reactors. This will allow fusion power to be achieved in years, not decades,” Kingham said.

“Our approach continues to be to break the journey down into a series of engineering challenges, raising additional investment on reaching each new milestone. We are already half-way to the goal of fusion energy; with hard work we will deliver fusion power at commercial scale by 2030,” he said.
__________________
Ka 'aina uluwehi, ko kakou
kuleana.


- The lush life-giving land, our personal responsibility.



To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
- Darlington County Chapter
Haole is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 05-01-2017, 05:52 AM   #2 (permalink)
Pirate4x4 Addict!
 
Screwzer2's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Member # 38193
Location: Nevada City, CA under a bridge
Posts: 69,497
Huh... Now you made me go to Wiki.

Quote:
In February 2012, millionaire Sidney Kimmel, convinced that cold fusion was worth investing in by a 19 April 2009 interview with physicist Robert Duncan on the US news-show 60 Minutes,[92] made a grant of $5.5 million to the University of Missouri to establish the Sidney Kimmel Institute for Nuclear Renaissance (SKINR). The grant was intended to support research into the interactions of hydrogen with palladium, nickel or platinum under extreme conditions.[92][93][94] In March 2013 Graham K. Hubler, a nuclear physicist who worked for the Naval Research Laboratory for 40 years, was named director.[95] One of the SKINR projects is to replicate a 1991 experiment in which Prelas says bursts of millions of neutrons a second were recorded, which was stopped because "his research account had been frozen". He claims that the new experiment has already seen "neutron emissions at similar levels to the 1991 observation".[96][97]

In May 2016, the United States House Committee on Armed Services, in its report on the 2017 National Defense Authorization Act, states that it is "aware of recent positive developments in developing low-energy nuclear reactions", and directed the Secretary of Defense to "provide a briefing on the military utility of recent U.S. industrial base LENR advancements to the House Committee on Armed Services by September 22, 2016."[98][99]
^^So is this a "real thing"?

Wiki kinda made is sound a bit 'specious.
__________________
Yesterday is History
Tomorrow is a Mystery
and Today is a Gift
That's why they call it the Present

—Eleanor Rososevelt
Screwzer2 is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 05-01-2017, 06:06 AM   #3 (permalink)
Rock God
 
billdacat's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Member # 72617
Location: Utah or bust!
Posts: 2,261
Compact Fusion

I will toss in another "Fusion" burrito for shits and giggles. Oddly Lockheed has posted several job openings for physicist for this program. But dream on folks.

Compact Fusion · Lockheed Martin

Enjoy
billdacat is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 05-01-2017, 06:15 AM   #4 (permalink)
Pirate4x4 Addict!
 
Screwzer2's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Member # 38193
Location: Nevada City, CA under a bridge
Posts: 69,497
If this shit gets real, Coal Miners gonna riot.

Fucking technology already costing 'em jobs. (Fracking)
__________________
Yesterday is History
Tomorrow is a Mystery
and Today is a Gift
That's why they call it the Present

—Eleanor Rososevelt
Screwzer2 is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 05-01-2017, 06:17 AM   #5 (permalink)
Zeus of the Sluice
 
Haole's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Member # 5859
Location: Here!
Posts: 108,056
Blog Entries: 1
Quote:
Originally Posted by Screwzer2 View Post
If this shit gets real, Coal Miners gonna riot.

Fucking technology already costing 'em jobs. (Fracking)
It'll ruin geothermal prospects in West Virginia.
__________________
Ka 'aina uluwehi, ko kakou
kuleana.


- The lush life-giving land, our personal responsibility.



To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
- Darlington County Chapter
Haole is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 05-01-2017, 06:20 AM   #6 (permalink)
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Member # 174037
Location: 'Cuse
Posts: 4,854
Quote:
Originally Posted by Screwzer2 View Post
If this shit gets real, Coal Miners gonna riot.

Fucking technology already costing 'em jobs. (Fracking)
"Our children will enjoy in their homes electrical energy too cheap to meter,"
will12785 is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 05-01-2017, 06:42 AM   #7 (permalink)
Zeus of the Sluice
 
Haole's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Member # 5859
Location: Here!
Posts: 108,056
Blog Entries: 1
Quote:
Originally Posted by will12785 View Post
"Our children will enjoy in their homes electrical energy too cheap to meter,"
That's probably beyond Screwy.

https://public-blog.nrc-gateway.gov/...of-the-phrase/

“Too Cheap to Meter”: A History of the Phrase

Donald Hintz, Chairman of the Nuclear Energy Institute, said at 2003 conference that the nuclear industry had been “plagued since the early days by the unfortunate quote: ‘Too cheap to meter’.” Those four words had become a standard catchphrase for what critics claim were impossibly sunny promises of nuclear power’s potential.

Not so fast, Hintz countered. He noted that Atomic Energy Commission Chairman Lewis Strauss, in a 1954 address to science writers, had coined the phrase to describe fusion power, not fission. Nuclear power may be a victim of mistaken identity.

Hintz was not alone in this view. Over the past four decades, antinuclear and pronuclear versions of what Strauss meant by “too cheap to meter” have appeared in articles, blogs, and books. Even Wikipedia has weighed in, on the pro-nuclear side. Reconciling the two versions isn’t easy since Strauss wasn’t explicit about what power source would electrify the utopian future he predicted.

The text in question:

“Transmutation of the elements,–unlimited power, ability to investigate the working of living cells by tracer atoms, the secret of photosynthesis about to be uncovered,–these and a host of other results all in 15 short years. It is not too much to expect that our children will enjoy in their homes electrical energy too cheap to meter,–will know of great periodic regional famines in the world only as matters of history,–will travel effortlessly over the seas and under them and through the air with a minimum of danger and at great speeds,–and will experience a lifespan far longer than ours, as disease yields and man comes to understand what causes him to age. This is the forecast for an age of peace.”*

Nuclear critics believe Strauss was speaking of nuclear power and claim that, as AEC Chairman, he spoke for a budding industry too. The most thorough defense of Strauss appeared in a 1980 article by the Atomic Industrial Forum.

Citing the opinions of Strauss’s son, former AEC staff, and a Strauss biographer, the AIF argued that Strauss’s omission of a power source in the passage was likely deliberate since he could not make explicit reference to “Project Sherwood,” the AEC’s still secret fusion power program that Strauss championed.

Moreover, the article noted, Strauss understood well that nuclear power would not pay for some years and that his utopian vision might be realized only by his “children’s, children’s, children.” Neither the industry nor the AEC, the AIF article notes, shared Strauss’s optimism.

While the AIF correctly notes the AEC Chairman’s interest in fusion, there is no evidence in Strauss’s papers at the Herbert Hoover Presidential Library to indicate fusion was the hidden subject of his speech. Staff suggestions for the address reflected current issues in the AEC’s civilian reactor program—the new Atomic Energy Act, President Eisenhower’s Atoms for Peace, the Shippingport nuclear power plant, the agency’s efforts to declassify information, and medical uses of reactor-produced isotopes.

While it is true that Strauss could not explicitly discuss classified fusion research, the speech is barren of implicit hints of a new source of power. Strauss focused on fission–the discovery of fission, fission-product applications, and the economic feasibility of fission power.

Strauss’s optimism for fission continued several days later when reporters on a Meet the Press radio broadcast asked him about the quotation and the viability of “commercial power from atomic piles.” Strauss replied that he expected his children and grandchildren would have power “too cheap to be metered, just as we have water today that’s too cheap to be metered.” That day, he said, might be “close at hand. I hope to live to see it.”

By contrast, when Strauss finally revealed the AEC’s fusion research program, he was not nearly as optimistic. In August 1955, he cautioned “there has been nothing in the nature of breakthroughs that would warrant anyone assuming that this [fusion power] was anything except a very long range—and I would accent the word ‘very’—prospect.”

In the years after the speech, the lay public and the power industry never questioned that Strauss’s predictions were for fission power. The New York Times Pulitzer Prize winning science reporter, William Laurence, attended Strauss’s speech and featured the catchphrase prominently in articles and a book. He wrote of the prediction, “All signs point to the realization within the next decade of a price for nuclear fuels so low that only hydroelectric power, which alone is produced without any cost for fuel could compete with it.”

The electric power industry was not happy with their new catchphrase. Industry officials distanced themselves from Strauss’s speech, sometimes diplomatically calling Strauss too optimistic.

Others were blunt. The president of Cleveland Electric Illuminating disparaged too cheap to meter as “a myth” given the small contribution fuel costs made to a customer’s electric bill. Electrical World called “too cheap to meter” a “delusion” that would make it harder for utility companies to explain electric costs to customers. In the meantime, the editors declared, utilities would welcome many more customers “with a meter in each and every one.”

This skepticism was echoed by more sober evaluations of nuclear power economics at the AEC and within the industry. Former AEC Commissioner James Ramey was probably correct when he said, “Nobody took Strauss’ statement very seriously.”

It is likely, then, that nuclear critics and proponents are partially correct. “Too cheap to meter” was a prediction for a fission utopia in the foreseeable future. But Strauss was speaking for himself.

“A serious governmental body ought not to indulge in predictions,” he said to the science writers. “However, as a person, I suffer from no such inhibition and will venture a few predictions before I conclude.”

He may have believed that he could step away from his Chairman’s role, indulge in speculation, and that history would note the difference.
__________________
Ka 'aina uluwehi, ko kakou
kuleana.


- The lush life-giving land, our personal responsibility.



To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
- Darlington County Chapter
Haole is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 05-01-2017, 08:23 AM   #8 (permalink)
Damn kids
 
plym49's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Member # 162771
Posts: 14,294
We have been 'just this far away' with fusion for 60-odd years.

It is demoralizing and humiliating. Of the two or three or four fusion approaches being looked at, I don't have faith in any of them given the track record of futility and failure.

Some fresh thinking and a more coordinated approach is needed. Either that or admit defeat all these scientists and engineers can go back to designing fossil and fission plants.

EDIT:

Oh, and regarding that 'too cheap to meter' comment. The official backpedaling in the above-posted statement is disingenuous. The TCTM statement was made continually, loud and clear, by everyone involved, and it ALWAYS referred to fission plants because FUSION PLANTS DID NOT EXIST. That rallying cry was the impetus that got many of the early fission plants built.

Just because you can't go back and Google that shit does not mean it was not said and meant. Dickwads cannot rewrite history. Don't fuck with old folks like me that have very clear memories about what actually did happen.
__________________
.

Always tip.



.

Last edited by plym49; 05-01-2017 at 08:28 AM.
plym49 is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 05-01-2017, 08:26 AM   #9 (permalink)
Registered User
 
Rerock's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Member # 28604
Location: Twins Territory
Posts: 8,215
Pardon my ignorance, but what element (or combination thereof) is capable of containing 100M degrees; that's slightly warm.
Rerock is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 05-01-2017, 08:34 AM   #10 (permalink)
Damn kids
 
plym49's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Member # 162771
Posts: 14,294
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rerock View Post
Pardon my ignorance, but what element (or combination thereof) is capable of containing 100M degrees; that's slightly warm.
Nothing. That's why Tokamak and other approaches. Create a magnetic bottle so the container does not see those temps.

The energy needed to create the magnetic containment field is immense and they are unstable so have only been able to operate for essentially fractions of a second. Every time they add an fractional increment of time, it is a 'breakthrough'. They are still well away from a reaction that is stable and also produces more power than it takes to operate.
__________________
.

Always tip.



.
plym49 is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 05-01-2017, 08:43 AM   #11 (permalink)
Meet me at the bar
 
crowbar7's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Member # 346233
Location: Ramona, CA
Posts: 1,155
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rerock View Post
Pardon my ignorance, but what element (or combination thereof) is capable of containing 100M degrees; that's slightly warm.
x2. I am very curious about this more than anything.
__________________
I love God, women and beer
crowbar7 is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 05-01-2017, 09:08 AM   #12 (permalink)
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Member # 143737
Location: NH
Posts: 2,332
Quote:
Originally Posted by plym49 View Post
Just because you can't go back and Google that shit does not mean it was not said and meant. Dickwads cannot rewrite history. Don't fuck with old folks like me that have very clear memories about what actually did happen.
Fond memories of building Yankee?
__________________
POS Ranger on narrow 3/4 tons with a 357w noise maker
posford is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 05-01-2017, 10:08 AM   #13 (permalink)
Rock God
 
rfr002's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Member # 63664
Location: Lake Charles, LA
Posts: 1,650
Since we have some people on pirate in the know about nuclear, let's switch gears from fusion to fission.

What's the hold up on thorium reactors?
__________________
Rob

Quote:
You won't find a larger gathering of generous and caring, mouth breathing, ego smashing, mother railing fucktards anywhere on the 'net.
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
rfr002 is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 05-01-2017, 10:14 AM   #14 (permalink)
Zeus of the Sluice
 
Haole's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Member # 5859
Location: Here!
Posts: 108,056
Blog Entries: 1
Quote:
Originally Posted by rfr002 View Post
Since we have some people on pirate in the know about nuclear, let's switch gears from fusion to fission.

What's the hold up on thorium reactors?
Lack of interest?
__________________
Ka 'aina uluwehi, ko kakou
kuleana.


- The lush life-giving land, our personal responsibility.



To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
- Darlington County Chapter
Haole is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 05-01-2017, 10:15 AM   #15 (permalink)
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Member # 86724
Posts: 29,787
@moggie

...
__________________
Electricity is really just organized lightning.
87manche is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 05-01-2017, 10:58 AM   #16 (permalink)
Pirate4x4 Addict!
 
nahmus's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Member # 57779
Posts: 22,218
I thought this was a good article on something new.

Better Nuclear Power Through Ping Pong

Quote:
The lab is deep-space quiet. A long, narrow hallway hung with fluorescent lights extends to my left. Four or five doors interrupt the flow of drywall. A few of those doors are open, the occupants of the rooms within now out in the hall and staring, ears plugged in anticipation.

A technician flips a small lever to activate the vacuum pumps on an 18-foot cannon that is tented in bulletproof polycarbonate. He's dressed casually in dark jeans and a black button-down, an ID card coolly clipped to his pants. He wears clear safety glasses and bright red protective headphones. Like the scientists down the hall, he is part of Intellectual Ventures in Bellevue, Washington—a skunkworks created by Nathan Myhrvold (Microsoft's former chief technical officer and a bit of a mad scientist), who pays some of the smartest doctors, biologists, chemists, nuclear scientists, demolition experts, and hackers to work together to create great things. Things like the cannon we're about to fire, which demonstrates technology that could change the nuclear power industry.

The pumps chitter away, sucking air from the barrel. That's the secret to breaking the sound barrier with a ping pong ball. If any air were left in front of the ball, it would crush the ball under the force of the acceleration. I press a button to release 400 psi of helium gas into the accumulator. The breech is loaded and the silence returns—until I yell "Fire in the hole!" and press the red fire button. A shattering ka-BAWOOOMM roars through the lab complex. The smell of smoke hits my nostrils. Splinters burst everywhere, crashing into the plywood backstop and bulletproof protection panels. They came from the ping pong paddle mounted two inches in front of the cannon. That paddle, a multilayered rubber-and-wood Stiga, now has a ping-pong-ball-shaped hole through its center. Considering that the little yellow ping pong ball was traveling at Mach 2.09, the paddle didn't have a chance.

The cannon is a prop, really—something to get potential investors excited about the technology. After our test fire, the scientists in the hallway are cheering. This isn't just work.

Conventional reactors use designs that remain basically unchanged since the 1950s. They require expensive enriched uranium and frequent fuel changes. The Intellectual Ventures design, from a spin-off called TerraPower, uses unenriched uranium and needs fuel changes every ten years.

That's the secret to breaking the sound barrier with a ping pong ball: If any air were left in front of the ball, it would crush the ball under the force of the acceleration.

What does any of that have to do with ping pong? Imagine the ping pong ball is a neutron. In a conventional reactor, a neutron knocks into an atom and releases two or three neutrons, creating heat in a slow chain reaction (see right). In the TerraPower reactor, that neutron travels more like the ping pong ball: at an insanely high speed. It bashes into atoms, freeing neutrons like the shards that fly from the demolished ping pong paddle—as many as six per collision. Those neutrons retain most of the speed of the first and go on to cause collisions of their own, freeing even more neutrons and continuing the chain reaction with exponentially higher efficiency. The design, called a Traveling Wave Reactor, unlocks about 30 times more energy, produces three to six times less waste, improves safety, and, TerraPower contends, will eventually eliminate the need to use enrichment. It also manages to use the plutonium created without having to remove it from the reaction and process it, which means the technology could be shared with rogue nations without worrying that it would be weaponized. (If the plutonium never comes out of the system, it can't be put in a missile.)

With our tests finished, the researchers head back to their labs to work on the next great project. 3ric Johanson (not a typo, he's a hacker and engineer), who worked on the cannon, turns to me with joy. Even if there hadn't been a nuclear project, he says, "we would have made the cannon anyway, just because it's cool." The group plans for the technology to be operational by 2027. In the meantime, they'll be doing a lot of testing of the ping pong cannon. Whether they need to or not.
Two Types of Nuclear Reactions
Slow

U-235 is the enriched uranium isotope. It's easily split by a neutron moving at slow speed. When the neutron hits the uranium atom, the atom divides into two fission products and releases two to three neutrons. One of those neutrons might be absorbed by unenriched uranium, U-238. One might hit another U-235 atom to continue the chain reaction. And most others will leak out and no longer contribute to the process. Enriched U-235 atoms must be added to continue the reaction. If too many U-238 atoms are present, the reaction will die.
Fast

Neutrons in fast reactions move much more quickly because they use liquid metal sodium as coolant instead of water. Sodium atoms are heavier than the atoms in water, so neutrons bounce off of them harder and retain their speed. When a neutron hits a U-235 atom, the higher velocity releases three to six neutrons. According to Nick Touran at TerraPower, one hits a U-235 atom to continue the reaction. Two or three hit U-238 atoms and convert them to plutonium. The rest are lost. Slow reactions don't have many extra neutrons, so U-238 atoms are rarely hit with another. But in fast reactions, free neutrons split the plutonium atoms, release more neutrons, and continue the reaction—without the need to remove the plutonium from the system for purification.
__________________
For the best deal on 8 lug disc brakes click here-->
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


World Proof your children, Don't child proof the world
nahmus is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 05-01-2017, 11:09 AM   #17 (permalink)
Oh Jesus Tits....
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Member # 17554
Location: Mesa, AZ
Posts: 2,660
So what are the meltdown risks? Similar to current nuke plants? Worse?

100M degrees is pretty toasty....that's bound to have some nasty side effects.
__________________
1977 Ford F150 4x4 Shorty 351M/NP435
2007 Ram 2500 Quad Cab 4x4 5.9 Cummins
D-RAT is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 05-01-2017, 11:13 AM   #18 (permalink)
Zeus of the Sluice
 
Haole's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Member # 5859
Location: Here!
Posts: 108,056
Blog Entries: 1
Quote:
Originally Posted by D-RAT View Post
So what are the meltdown risks? Similar to current nuke plants? Worse?

100M degrees is pretty toasty....that's bound to have some nasty side effects.
Theoretically? If the process stops, it instantly stops generating heat (unlike fission which can generate heat residually.) Generation of radioactive materials will be minimal.
__________________
Ka 'aina uluwehi, ko kakou
kuleana.


- The lush life-giving land, our personal responsibility.



To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
- Darlington County Chapter
Haole is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 05-01-2017, 11:48 AM   #19 (permalink)
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2005
Member # 48233
Location: Northern VA
Posts: 11,375
Quote:
Originally Posted by Haole View Post
Lack of interest?
Lots of reasons

Plus the nuclear technology in use is about 60 years old. Tons of research was lost when funding went away. Salt reactors are sweet and highly efficient. A new reactor type has been recently developed and uses the waste we have locked away in the mountains. Basically waste will be cut down to like 1/16 of what it currently is
__________________
[quote=texasblake;11194923]
they may be waving like mccain for the rest of their life, but you taught them an important life lesson and they had fun doing it.[/quote]

[QUOTE=xyjbeaker;9759686]"mexican food reminds you of my face?"[/QUOTE]
Doc Holiday13 is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 05-01-2017, 01:03 PM   #20 (permalink)
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Member # 36733
Location: Was Bozeman now Cofederated tribes res
Posts: 10,397
Quote:
Originally Posted by Haole View Post
Especially with the cold fusion debacle. Every article that I've read about this sounds like a press release by the company to generate more investment rather than a science based article. It would be nice if they get it to generate usable power.

https://nuclearstreet.com/nuclear_po...-plasma-042801

A privately funded company in Britain, Tokamak Energy, said Friday it had turned on its third reactor in five years, the ST40 fusion reactor, which has achieved its first plasma and has a goal of reaching 100 million degrees, far hotter than the center of the sun.

The ST40 is the third stage of a five-stage plan that aims to use fusion energy to contribute to the commercial grid by 2030, says the company which set a record of 29 hours of continuous plasma in 2015, using the company's second reactor, the ST25.

The company that grew out of the Culham Center for Fusion Energy, is based in Oxfordshire. It was established in 2009 for the purpose of designing and developing small fusion reactors that would be viable on a commercial basis.

“With the ST40 up and running, the next steps are to complete the commissioning and installation of the full set of magnetic coils which are crucial to reaching the temperatures required for fusion. This will allow the ST40 to a produce plasma temperature of 15 million degrees – as hot as the center of the sun,” said Tokamak. The goal is to reach that temperature by the fall of this year.

The company has a strategy of achieving milestones, then seeking new funding with the confidence that comes with success. Following the 15 million milestone, the company expects to forge ahead and reach 100 million degrees in 2018 – a record-breaking milestone for a privately owned and funded fusion reactor. Still "significant investment" is needed, said Dr. David Kingham, the company's chief executive officer.

The company said 100 million degrees was a vital target, as it is only above this temperature that charged particles that naturally repel can be forced together to induce the controlled fusion reaction. Subsequently, this is the necessary milestone for creating a commercially viable fusion power produced in a compact, spherical tokamak reactor.

The company said that in 17 years, it had already reached the half-way point of its plan to deliver fusion power. It is focused on working with a smaller reactor design – called a compact, spherical tokamak – that enables quicker development of devices, therefore speeding up the process towards achieving their ultimate targets: producing first electricity by 2025 and commercially viable fusion power by 2030. Tokamak Energy’s research has also proven that this route to fusion power can be much faster than the development of conventional large-scale tokamak devices.

“We are unveiling the first world-class controlled fusion device to have been designed, built and operated by a private venture. The ST40 is a machine that will show fusion temperatures – 100 million degrees – are possible in compact, cost-effective reactors. This will allow fusion power to be achieved in years, not decades,” Kingham said.

“Our approach continues to be to break the journey down into a series of engineering challenges, raising additional investment on reaching each new milestone. We are already half-way to the goal of fusion energy; with hard work we will deliver fusion power at commercial scale by 2030,” he said.
Look up the term fusor...folks in their back yard doing fusion reactor experimentation. Been around for a while now since the early Tokamaks started showing some promise and LLRL did the work on ICF and fuel related efforts.

Fusor.net

The primary issue is they cant get real fuel for regulation reasons though some have...
__________________
[I]Vegetarian is an old Native American word for bad hunter[/I]
DavidVanVorous is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 05-01-2017, 01:17 PM   #21 (permalink)
Rock God
 
rfr002's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Member # 63664
Location: Lake Charles, LA
Posts: 1,650
Quote:
Originally Posted by Haole View Post
Lack of interest?
Could be, but why? They use something we're already pulling out of the ground (in the US) and considering waste and the design is inherently safe.

I'm not involved in the nuclear field so I don't know the details. I would like to know what the cons to the technology are.
__________________
Rob

Quote:
You won't find a larger gathering of generous and caring, mouth breathing, ego smashing, mother railing fucktards anywhere on the 'net.
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
rfr002 is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 05-01-2017, 04:01 PM   #22 (permalink)
Damn kids
 
plym49's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Member # 162771
Posts: 14,294
Quote:
Originally Posted by posford View Post
Fond memories of building Yankee?
Shit yeah.
__________________
.

Always tip.



.
plym49 is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 05-01-2017, 04:36 PM   #23 (permalink)
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Member # 167429
Posts: 7
Iter.org
resident e is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 05-01-2017, 04:56 PM   #24 (permalink)
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Member # 95025
Location: No Country For Old Men
Posts: 17,481
Blog Entries: 1
What's the Clift's Notes of this?
__________________
ΜΟΛΩΝ ΛΑΒΕ

President Trump on building the wall:
"THIS IS WHERE WE HOLD THEM!!! THIS IS WHERE WE FIGHT!!! THIS IS WHERE THEY'RE DEPORTED!!!"

V.P.Pence:
BUILD THIS WALL, BOYS!!!

Fearless Indians:
Awe-Ooo!!!
CDA 455 is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 05-01-2017, 10:09 PM   #25 (permalink)
Zeus of the Sluice
 
Haole's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Member # 5859
Location: Here!
Posts: 108,056
Blog Entries: 1
Quote:
Originally Posted by Doc Holiday13 View Post
Lots of reasons

Plus the nuclear technology in use is about 60 years old. Tons of research was lost when funding went away. Salt reactors are sweet and highly efficient. A new reactor type has been recently developed and uses the waste we have locked away in the mountains. Basically waste will be cut down to like 1/16 of what it currently is
What's that got to do with the question?
__________________
Ka 'aina uluwehi, ko kakou
kuleana.


- The lush life-giving land, our personal responsibility.



To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
- Darlington County Chapter
Haole is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the Pirate4x4.Com : 4x4 and Off-Road Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

** A VERIFICATION EMAIL IS SENT TO THIS ADDRESS TO COMPLETE REGISTRATION!! **

Email Address:
Insurance
Please select your insurance company (Optional)

Log-in


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On



All times are GMT -7. The time now is 07:49 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0 ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.
User Alert System provided by Advanced User Tagging (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.