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brokenparts 04-23-2015 09:27 AM

1 Attachment(s)
Great build!

EricsGreen98Tj 04-26-2015 04:08 PM

Just read the whole thread. Can't think of a better way to waste a few hours.

Did you every hook up the saddle tanks?

Did the OEM Ford cluster work?

Nice job and thanks for your service to our country.

guidolyons 04-26-2015 05:27 PM

1772 Attachment(s)
Quote:

Originally Posted by brokenparts (Post 31349226)
Great build!

Thanks

Quote:

Originally Posted by EricsGreen98Tj (Post 31391034)
Just read the whole thread. Can't think of a better way to waste a few hours.

Did you every hook up the saddle tanks?

Did the OEM Ford cluster work?

Nice job and thanks for your service to our country.

I still have the saddle tanks, but have not hooked either of them up, yet. I do plan on using one of them plumbed into the stock Ford fuel transfer switch.

I pulled the whole wiring harness from the Ford and used the Ford cluster, 1. because it was faster/easier, 2. I wasn't sure how much/what the PSD needed to run. All the gauges work, except the speedometer does not work properly, it shows less than 5 MPH and the odometer clicks a tenth per mile since my sending unit is in the transfercase not the rear axle. I use a GPS, so it hasn't been a big deal.

I have since discovered that it runs just fine without the Ford cluster and I have a set of Autometer gauges (including a programmable speedo) that I am going to swap in.

guidolyons 04-27-2015 12:03 PM

1777 Attachment(s)
Update time. Made some new driveshafts, chopped up the front crossmember, and went 'wheeling :grinpimp:

I've had all the bits and pieces to make my front driveshaft, but had been putting if off for awhile. I thought I was going to need a two piece front driveshaft, but after mocking up the pillow block and front driveshaft, the angles were too steep, and I found I actually had room for a one piece driveshaft. Since I didn't need a two piece front driveshaft, I had enough 1350 parts left over to make a new rear driveshaft, too. :grinpimp:

It turns out my stock Scout 80 rear driveshaft was almost perfect length for my new front shaft. It barely bolted in at ride height and actually needed about 5 more inches. It doesn't have enough slip for full droop (I have apiece of cable as a limit strap), but it works for now until I can figure a long travel slip.

DIY driveshaft building 101. Measure at full droop, ride height, and full stuff/compression. It's much easier to shorten an existing 'shaft, than to lengthen, but you can DIY a longer shaft, too.

Make sure you have enough slip for full travel, if not, err on the side of caution at full stuff and limit extension if you need to. I'd rather have a shaft be too short than too long. A shaft that is too long can the break transmission/transfercase, too short no harm done.

Using a thin cut off wheel, cut through the weld just enough the separate the yoke from the driveshaft. I like to rotate it as I cut (roll it along the edge of a table, etc) it seems to get a smoother, more even cut. Once the groove is deep enough, give it a few whacks with a dead blow hammer (or a hammer with a block of wood) if it doesn't separate, make a relief cut perpendicular to the shaft and it should pop loose.

Attachment 1936522

I got a little carried away and cut a bit too deep, but no worries.

Here's the yoke. It's got a nice shoulder on it that fits tight in the tube.

Attachment 1936546

Double check your measurements and cut the driveshaft to length (account for the length of the yoke) Make the cut as square as you can, as it will make it easier to line everything up. A stainless steel hose clamp makes a good guide if you don't have a bandsaw/chopsaw/sawzall that cuts square. Clean it up with a flapwheel. Tap the yoke in the end of the shaft.

Use a sturdy straight edge (large angle or some square tube works well) to make sure the yokes are "in phase" otherwise you will get some wicked vibrations. This also helps get the driveshaft fairly straight. Rear shaft is~ 19" and front is ~42".

Attachment 1936530
Using the Mark I hairy eyeball and a few taps of the deadblow hammer gets the shaft pretty straight. A few light tack welds 90* apart.

Install in the truck and give it a spin to make sure it spins true. A dial indicator will really help true it up. Look for the most out of round spot, then whack it with a hammer until it's as straight as you can get it. Then pull it out an final weld. I'll lay a few heavy tacks (90* apart) then weld about an inch at a time on opposite sides so the weld doesn't pull the yoke out of alignment.
Attachment 1936554

For the front shaft, I didn't have a piece of tube long enough, so I just cut and sleeved using a short piece of extra tube, relief cut and inserted into the ID to help align. It's not the best way, but worked fine for a front shaft. I got the front shaft down to .030" run out, the rear even better at .010"
Attachment 1936538

guidolyons 04-27-2015 12:04 PM

1777 Attachment(s)
My rear driveshaft is now 1350 u-joints on both ends (the previous one, now a trail spare, is 1330 on the slip (1330-1350 conversion joint) and 1350 at the axle) Now all driveshaft u-joints are 1350, except the front D60.

Attachment 1936610

I need to address a slight oil pan clearance issue to go to 1350 at that end, too. 1310 yoke barely fits at full stuff, just a wee bit of friendly contact with the oil pan.

Attachment 1936618

I had to chop the crossmember to allow for the one piece driveshaft so I got creative with some 2x .188 strap. Clears at full droop with 3/4" clearance.

It's got some funky angles to account for the bend in the original Ford crossmember.

Attachment 1936626

Drooped out

Attachment 1936634

Attachment 1936642

guidolyons 04-27-2015 06:32 PM

1772 Attachment(s)
Drove the Scout 5 hours to Hidden Falls Offroad Park in Marble Falls, TX for the Hill Country Binder Bash. I had a great time and got to finally meet my imaginary internet friends.


Attachment 1743394

Attachment 1743402

Attachment 1743410

Edit: Added 2 more sweet action shots:
Attachment 1745522

Attachment 1745530

Harvester of Sorrow 04-28-2015 07:23 AM

Fuck yeah man...great feeling I am sure.

MochaMike 04-28-2015 08:47 AM

That DS/oil pan issue will self clearance.... (just carry some JB weld).

My front DS CV rubs on the frame rail all the time.... Just spray it with some paint after each run & it's fine.

MotoDave 04-28-2015 09:06 AM

That looks like a blast, can't wait to get out and use mine.

Nice write-up on the drive shaft tech too.

D-RAT 04-28-2015 01:21 PM

What a cool build thread. Like your truck.

I know you solved the squirreliness with a sway bar out back. Seems to me moving the leaf springs outboard a few inches would also be effective at stabilizing the truck. My nitpicky 2 cents worth. I'm amazed you got that big diesel in a little 800. Definitely one of the coolest 800s I've ever seen.

guidolyons 04-28-2015 03:04 PM

1772 Attachment(s)
Quote:

Originally Posted by Harvester of Sorrow (Post 31412618)
Fuck yeah man...great feeling I am sure.

You bet :grinpimp: Yeah it was great to get out an 'wheel instead of being a jackstand hero & mall crawler.

Quote:

Originally Posted by MochaMike (Post 31414146)
That DS/oil pan issue will self clearance.... (just carry some JB weld).

I knew the clearance was going to be super close. I had some JB weld...just in case. I'm gonna give it a couple of good whacks with a BFH, now that I know exactly where to hit it :D I'll need to notch the oil pan to clear a 1350 yoke, but that should hold for now.

Quote:

Originally Posted by MotoDave (Post 31414458)
That looks like a blast, can't wait to get out and use mine.

Nice write-up on the drive shaft tech too.

Thanks, I stole the idea from OldBlueCJ7's write up (his pics are gone though) https://www.pirate4x4.com/forum/gener...ing-101-a.html

Quote:

Originally Posted by D-RAT (Post 31418706)
What a cool build thread. Like your truck.

I know you solved the squirreliness with a sway bar out back. Seems to me moving the leaf springs outboard a few inches would also be effective at stabilizing the truck. My nitpicky 2 cents worth. I'm amazed you got that big diesel in a little 800. Definitely one of the coolest 800s I've ever seen.

Thanks. You are probably right-if I outboarded the springs it would be more stable...but IMHO not worth the work to do it. If I was going to spend more time on the suspension, it would be to do a 3 or 4 link.

With long flat leaf springs it flexes really well. We went through a canyon called Bronco Buster that has some pretty good axle twisters and the Scout just crawled right through.

The Scout did awesome, I ran 65-70MPH going there and back, got ~16-17 MPG, I even got up to 80MPH once passing a truck...a Scout 80 on 37s does not need to go 80!:eek:

jemarshall 09-24-2015 10:53 AM

Looking into sway bars for the kids and was wondering which ones you used and what you think of them and if you would have gone with either a stiffer or softer bar.

The front of hers with the 53" springs is getting pretty hairy. I am going to try to get the ones under the rear Friday so I can take it out for a decent little shake down this weekend, and I am expecting that to make the body roll allot worse.

guidolyons 09-24-2015 02:02 PM

I got the Currie Anti-Rock sway bars, 36" width, with the steel 18" arms CE 9901-18. Sway Bar diameter is .75" 36" is the perfect width for the Scout frame. Currie Enterprises CJ Axle Parts
Ouch! Price has gone up! I paid ~$350/ea

I started off on the center hole/middle adjustment in the arm, and worked well with no top, but once I added the top back on put some weight in the back, I had to move down to the stiffest setting, which is still a bit soft but seems to be working well. I might drill another hole to shorten it a bit more.

I think you can order a .800" diam bar, too.

I'm very happy with them, I was going to try to junkyard scrounge something together, but they saved me a ton of fab work, it was very easy to install, lots of adjustability. Work good offroad, too.

guidolyons 09-24-2015 04:05 PM

5 Attachment(s)
Found some old pics from when I was getting the Scout ready to ship back from Hawaii. I knew my hard top was in rough shape, but it had been hanging in my garage for 4 years...it wasn't really a priority when it's 78* year round :D

So I dropped it down and started peeling off latex caulking, fiberglass window screen and Bondo and uncovered a lot more rust :mad3: If I had access to another hard top I would have pulled the glass and scrapped it, but I didn't and I needed the hard top at least semi-servicable.

Attachment 1929178

Attachment 1929186

Attachment 1929194

Window Screen and Bondo
Attachment 1929210

Aluminum flashing screwed into the top:
Attachment 1929202

guidolyons 09-24-2015 04:09 PM

4 Attachment(s)
So I used my hitch mounted homemade sheetmetal brake to bend up a new drip rail for above the back lift gate.

http://www.justih.org/photopost/data...25_163530a.jpg

The original drip rail had a seam in the bottom that allowed water to collect and just rusted away the entire bit, so I cutout the rust and made an extra long piece so the water couldn't get in, I also added another piece of angle along the top of the lift gate on the inside to reinforce.

Attachment 1929218

Attachment 1929226

Attachment 1929234



I used some 3M VHB tape to bond the aluminum angle, super strong stuff!
Attachment 1929242

guidolyons 09-24-2015 04:12 PM

3 Attachment(s)
The front windshield flange was pretty rough in the corners, it was completely rusted through on the driver's side. I used some 16 ga to make a whole new flange. Should be stronger than the original, it's a bit thicker.

Attachment 1929250

Attachment 1929258

Attachment 1929266

Then I used fiberglass cloth mat and fiberglassed the perimeter of the hardtop around the drip rails and about 3 inches up the top to seal up any pin holes, etc. Lost the pics of that when I broke my phone.

Should last me a few more years now, once I get some Hushmat and paint on it.

guidolyons 09-24-2015 04:16 PM

5 Attachment(s)
I don't know if y'all noticed, but it is HOT in south Texas. I haven't even really driven the Scout that much because the Ford Heat/AC unit I had chopped up never really worked that well, it took up all of the passenger fender well and most of the dash. The fan was on the inner fender and by the time it got in the cab, it was a light puff of air. It sort of defrosted, and the floor heat worked but who needs floor heat? The floor was plenty hot already. :hot:

AC was not a priority in Hawaii as I had a bikini top and the weather was 78* all the time. :flipoff2:

I started looking around at aftermarket AC units that were small enough to fit under the dash, and would be more efficient than the hacked up Ford AC unit.

CommancheScott used an Old Air Product Hurricane unit in his 800, so after a little more research, I called them and ordered one up. They had never sold one for a Scout with a 7.3 PSD, but after answering a bunch of questions, I was confident I could make it work. Since I already had the compressor, condenser and receiver dryer, all I needed was the inside unit which is about half the cost of a complete kit, plus they are located in DFW TX, so I got it in about 2 days. :grinpimp:

After mocking it up I did need to order some extra fittings to mate up with the Ford receiver dryer and a new piece of tubing to reroute to the condenser.

Time to pull the dash an get to work:

Attachment 1929274

I originally build the dash to fit around the Ford AC and instrument cluster.

Attachment 1929282

Attachment 1929290

Attachment 1929298

Old versus new
Ford unit up top, Hurricane unit down below.

Attachment 1929306

jemarshall 09-24-2015 04:19 PM

Thanks for the info. :smokin:

guidolyons 09-24-2015 04:32 PM

5 Attachment(s)
I never really liked using the Ford instrument cluster, but I wasn't sure if the ECU needed the stock instrument cluster to work and it made getting the Scout operational much easier. Later on, I found out that it runs just find with out it. I figured while I had the dash apart for the AC unit, I might as well finish that up with some new gauges as well. I'd had them for awhile, just never motivated enough to tear the dash out to fix it.

Attachment 1929314

I also didn't like that I had to bump up the driver's side dash to fit the Ford instrument cluster, so I chopped that part off, too.

Attachment 1929322

Inspired by JEMARSHALL's 800 style instrument cluster I set out to mount up my programmable Speedometer (the Ford one never worked right since I moved the sender from the rear axle to the transfer case, it was off by at least a factor of 10, 60MPH indicated 6MPH and 1 mile was .1 mile on the odometer. I used a GPS to keep me straight), tachometer, volt meter, and fuel gauge. I already had oil pressure, engine temp, boost, and EGT in the center of the dash.

Attachment 1929354

This also gave me room for two AC vents on the driver's side :D

Tried a few different designs and layouts to fit around the steering column and where the gauges would fit that I could see. My tach is smaller than my speedo, but it still looks pretty well balanced.

Attachment 1929362

Attachment 1929370

guidolyons 09-24-2015 04:37 PM

5 Attachment(s)
After about a dozen different layout ideas, I chose this one for the final layout:

Attachment 1929378

Cut out the gauge holes with an adjustable fly cutter. Easy to adjust so the gauges fit snug, and cuts cleaner than a regular hole saw.

Attachment 1929386

Attachment 1929394

Attachment 1929402

The lights are from LEDs from Dorman. Across the top: LH Turn signal (green), High Beam (blue), RH Turn signal (green). Check engine (amber) lower right, and the Alternator/charge indicator (red) on lower left. I had to replace the charge indicator with an incandescent bulb, the LED stayed lit all the time, even when it was supposed to be off because it takes so little current.
I also had to change the Check Engine Light, the LED stayed on even when it was off, swapped it for a low profile Hella amber indicator light.
Pre-wired to make it easier to mate up with the stock wiring harness. Connectors are 6 pin trailer light connectors.

Attachment 1929410

guidolyons 09-24-2015 04:40 PM

This is the AC unit I used Old Air Products Hurricane 1000 with cable controls: Custom Aftermarket A/C Systems & Replacement Parts for Hot Rod, Classic, & Vintage Cars/Trucks - Universal HURRICANE Systems - Cable Operated
~$1070 for the full kit, $505 for just the inside kit. I also had to order some extra fittings and a piece of tube to adapt to the Ford receiver dryer and the condenser.

http://www.justih.org/Binder-Bench/a...1&d=1442113216

jemarshall 09-24-2015 04:41 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by guidolyons (Post 33540906)
The lights are from LEDs from Dorman. Across the top: LH Turn signal (green), High Beam (blue), RH Turn signal (green). Check engine (amber) lower right, and the Alternator/charge indicator (red) on lower left. I had to replace the charge indicator with an incandescent bulb, the LED stayed lit all the time, even when it was supposed to be off because it takes so little current.

I would suggest resistors on the lights to dim them a little, they are fin bright :eek:

Scout Dude 09-24-2015 04:44 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by guidolyons (Post 33540962)
This is the AC unit I used Old Air Products Hurricane 1000 with cable controls
~$1070 for the full kit, $505 for just the inside kit.

Finally, some tech that I find interesting. Can you tell that I am getting old?:flipoff2:

guidolyons 09-24-2015 04:44 PM

4 Attachment(s)
A little final test fit before I mount the gauges.

Attachment 1929450

I have attend to some rust issues before I continue with the dash and AC install :mad3:

Rust never sleeps! Back in ~2009 when I had the Scout torn down for the diesel swap, I fixed the rust around the hinge boxes, at the time there was a small spot of rust on the inner driver's side behind the dash above the floor vent, and the passenger side seemed solid. So I left it alone. :(

I'm not sure who was in charge of this little bit of design work at IH, but the area above the fresh air vent behind the door hinge box is horrible, it traps dirt and water and is a breeding ground for the evil tinworm.

Driver's side
Attachment 1929458

Attachment 1929466

Passenger side is a little better, but not by much:
Attachment 1929474

guidolyons 09-24-2015 04:48 PM

5 Attachment(s)
So I got some high zinc weld trough primer and some seam sealer and went to work on the rust:

I drilled a drain hole hidden behind the inner panel above the vent. Hopefully that will let water drain out between the inner panel and the inner fender, so maybe that will help keep the rust at bay.

Used some handy blue tape to make a template and welded them in. Somehow I deleted the inprogress pics :confused: Oh well, looks much mo better now. After I welded up, I drilled a small hole up top and sprayed bed liner inbetween the panels. I also seam sealed the patch panel as well as the seam above the windshield channel that should help keep water out.

Attachment 1929514

Attachment 1929522

Attachment 1929530

Attachment 1929538

Big ol' can o' FAIL, I had a little problem with the valve on the Duplicolor bed liner spray :mad4: It worked for a while, then started spewing out of the top of the can rather than the nozzle. :mad3: I was able to get enough out of the can to spray the upper part of the firewall and the patched areas above the fresh air vents.

Attachment 1929546


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