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Old 10-20-2016, 01:56 PM   #1 (permalink)
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Another CJ Build

I. Introduction

Hello, this is my first Jeep; chances are good that I have no idea what I'm getting myself into. The plan is to do a tub-off restoration and a SBC swap. I'm going to make some mistakes as I move along--I hope ya’ll aren’t too shy with the constructive criticism.

II. The Heep

Here are some photos the day after I brought it home. I bought it on EBay without having had a chance to inspect it, but it seems to be in better shape than I thought. The prior owner said it had been sitting in a field for three years after the motor grenadeed itself. The rest of the Heep is in pieces in the garage.





Original rear seat in surprisingly nice shape.




With the hood on. With progress like this, I'll be done in no time.



This was a nice surprise.



And so was this. It's too bad the T5 won't be staying. 



III. New Tires

I decided the first step was to order new tires. My thought was that new tires would make the car easier to roll around because they would actually hold air. I also figured it would be nice to have the tires on to examine fitment before settling on a final lift setup. My fear is whether or not I can get the project done before these dry rot too...

I went with Mickey Thompson Deegan 38s in 33x12.5x15. I never thought I would be excited to buy tires.



Was curious how they were going to look.

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Old 10-20-2016, 01:57 PM   #2 (permalink)
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III. New Tires (Cont.)
Heep rolled in.



Jacked up. Filthy.



Something that will be a recurring challenge in this build is that my normal car isn't spacious. I didn't want to wait for a friend with a truck, so I ended up making 6 trips like this...



Eventually I had them all home.



And then they were mounted. I think the Heep has a 2.5" spring lift and a 3" body lift. I haven't decided what I want to do in the long run, but I'm pretty confident I want to go with a shorter body lift.





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Old 10-20-2016, 01:57 PM   #3 (permalink)
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IV. Disassembly, Inspection, and Rotisserie

Patient in the operating room. If I went much higher I'm not sure it would clear the garage door.



The original color of the car was this maroon. The roll bar padding did a nice job protecting the paint.



Seats out.



Rust situation. The inside of the tub is coated in bedliner. I'm not sure how much cancer it's hiding.



Doesn't seem too bad...



Off goes the dash.



I saw a post somewhere on the internet where a guy made a rotisserie out of Horrible Freight engine stands. I thought that was brilliant and decided I wanted to give it a try. I bought two 1,000 lbs capacity stands and one 750 lbs capacity stand. The two 1,000 lbs stands are used for the main uprights. The 750 lbs stand is used for extra materials and parts.



In order to get enough height to completely rotate the tub, I chopped up the 750 lbs stand and made extensions for the 1,000 lbs stands. The smaller stand is made of the same square tubing as the larger ones.



I tried to keep them straight with clamps while welding the pieces together, but ultimately the whole project didn't really require that much precision.


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Old 10-20-2016, 01:58 PM   #4 (permalink)
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IV. Disassembly, Inspection, and Rotisserie (Cont.)

There is enough material between the three engine stands to make a brace that will run underneath the tub.



Starting to take shape.



I debated using 2x4s to mount the casters, but decided that it would be too ghetto, even for this.



Back to the rotisserie a little later.



Here is a bonus shot of the engine it came with.



I think I've diagnosed the problem, but I guess you can never been 100% sure.





And also, at some point during all of the above I noticed I had a problem--one of the brand new tires was running low.



Soapy water test revealed it was leaking out of the stem. I brought it back to the tire shop and when they dismounted the tire they showed me the inside of the rim. It was covered in corrosion. I didn't have the wherewithal to take a photo so ya'll are gonna have to trust me. At some point before the Heep is driving, I'm going to dismount the tires and see if the wheels can be saved with some some sand blasting.



Disassembly continues.



Everything in the dash came out pretty easy.

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Old 10-20-2016, 01:59 PM   #5 (permalink)
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IV. Disassembly, Inspection, and Rotisserie (Cont.)

The first real battle came from the roll bar bolts. I tried PB Blaster, a torch, and a breaker bar, but I kept breaking the bit. The bedliner wasn't helping because it prevented the pb blaster from pent rating and it burned nasty with the torch, even after trying to grind it off. I think the bit in this photo may have been a size too small.



Eventually I found the right size tool.




And out it came.



More stuff coming off.




I used the engine hoist to pull the tub up. The body bolts didn't give me too much trouble.



Eventually, separation. Don't forget to unhook the parking brake cable.




Had to leave it here for the night.

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Old 10-20-2016, 01:59 PM   #6 (permalink)
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IV. Disassembly, Inspection, and Rotisserie (Cont.)

Back to the rotisserie. I went to this place to get materials for the tub mounts and the wheel mounts. They have a scrap bin that sells you steel for I think 75 cents per lb, but I unfortunately couldn't get everything I needed out of the scrap bin. I had to buy a 20 ft length of square tube for the wheel mounts and main tub mounts. Total for the square tub, cuts, and some miscellaneous scrap tube came out to about $100.



Started to make the tub mounts.



I wish they all looked like this one.



I'm using the factory mounting positions with the 3" body lift bushings that came with the Heep. In order to keep the tub level the front mounts need to be about 2" higher than the rear. That's not an exact measurement.




Getting the mounts into the frame was a pain, but eventually it worked out.



And it has just enough clearance to spin.


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Old 10-20-2016, 02:00 PM   #7 (permalink)
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IV. Disassembly, Inspection, and Rotisserie (Final)

The frame seems to be in good shape and it looks like it has a larger than normal gas tank. Anyone have an idea of who may make it?







Having the tub up on the rotisserie makes it pretty easy to see everything that's wrong with it. I hope it ends up saving my back later too.






And that's where we are now. I just sold the bike to help finance the project, which means I have some new tools showing up later this week. I think the next step will be dealing with the rust.

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Old 10-24-2016, 11:49 AM   #8 (permalink)
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I'll be watching this... Props for having the patience to step by step the progress.
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Old 10-25-2016, 08:17 AM   #9 (permalink)
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Just totally disassembled my '81 CJ7. Planning on sending the tub to be sandblasted. Got an '03 Suburban 5.3/4L60 to put in it. Def gonna keep an eye on your thread!
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Old 10-25-2016, 08:39 PM   #10 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 93_Fummins View Post
I'll be watching this... Props for having the patience to step by step the progress.
It's been years since I've bothered to make a build thread about anything and I figured it would be nice to document the build for posterity's sake. I hope you enjoy it!

Quote:
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Just totally disassembled my '81 CJ7. Planning on sending the tub to be sandblasted. Got an '03 Suburban 5.3/4L60 to put in it. Def gonna keep an eye on your thread!
Sounds like we're going down a similar path. I'm vacillating between a used fuel injected lsx (an iron block variant) or a carb'd Blueprint Engines crate motor. I like the idea of keeping it simple with a carb, but fuel injection certainly has its advantages...

I made a small amount of progress. I picked up a pressure washer. It's nice that I can touch the tub without getting covered in filth now. I also think this got rid of the fire ants.








And more importantly, this thing showed up.


Last edited by Dominick C; 10-25-2016 at 08:40 PM.
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Old 10-27-2016, 09:32 PM   #11 (permalink)
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Deffinitely gonna watch this project, good luck on the build
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Old 10-28-2016, 11:46 AM   #12 (permalink)
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nice can't wait to see what happens
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Old 11-15-2016, 08:37 PM   #13 (permalink)
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Thanks everyone. Small update:

Presents from Classic Enterprises.



I decided it would be good to replace the entire floorpan.



This is cool: each panel is signed by the person that made it. The metal looks to be gauged appropriately and the construction quality appears very good.



The trunk floor braces look to be more heavy duty than factory.




The thin part looks a little cock-eyed from shipping. None of the cross braces are bent so I think it should straighten out once everything gets fitted.



New braces for the front. I didn't order the horizontal brace. I'm going to try to salvage the one that's in there. Not sure how optimistic I should be.



I also picked up a new riser and rear tailgate/body mount.

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Old 11-22-2016, 02:44 PM   #14 (permalink)
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Their panels are nice but man that's a lot of cheddar in sheetmetal With that said, I will likely be ordering the rear floor and rear valence panel for them. I bought a full sheet of 18 gauge to make new front floors, one rear corner and one rocker, that has been an adventure. I braced the floors with 1x2 14 gauge square tube. Looks ok and will be getting bedlined so I wasn't worried about originality.
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Old 11-22-2016, 06:01 PM   #15 (permalink)
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I didn't have enough jeep left to hook to rotisserie, lol. Nice build, can't wait to see it come along.
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Old 11-22-2016, 09:39 PM   #16 (permalink)
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Nice build, looks great!
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Old 11-25-2016, 08:35 PM   #17 (permalink)
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Looks good so far. Good luck on the build.
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Old 11-28-2016, 04:17 PM   #18 (permalink)
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Nice what are your plans for the gear-train? Not keeping the T5?
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Old 11-29-2016, 08:57 AM   #19 (permalink)
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Make sure to brace that tub up before cutting the panels out!
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Old 11-30-2016, 11:28 AM   #20 (permalink)
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Thanks everyone for the encouragement.

I've been tinkering with setting up the air compressor and some related tools. I'll post an updated related to that soon. I should also be able to start on stripping the tub and replacing the floor soon. I have some parts related to that arriving on Friday.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sharpest View Post
Their panels are nice but man that's a lot of cheddar in sheetmetal With that said, I will likely be ordering the rear floor and rear valence panel for them. I bought a full sheet of 18 gauge to make new front floors, one rear corner and one rocker, that has been an adventure. I braced the floors with 1x2 14 gauge square tube. Looks ok and will be getting bedlined so I wasn't worried about originality.
I went back and forth on whether or not I should go with them or a cheaper alternative. All of the reviews I read said they were worth the money so I went for it. I may change my mind on this, but I don't think I'm going to bedline the inside of the tub. If that's what I end up doing I think it will have been worth it to me to keep the inside looking original.

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I didn't have enough jeep left to hook to rotisserie, lol. Nice build, can't wait to see it come along.
I think I lucked out with how little rot this jeep actually has. It spent a good amount of its life in the north east.

Quote:
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Nice what are your plans for the gear-train? Not keeping the T5?
I'm going to ditch the T5 but keep the Dana 300. I'm trying to decide between an AX15 and an Nv4500. I'm not sure if the 4500 is worth the extra cost, but it would make the drivetrain bulletproof for any future upgrades. Any thoughts?

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Make sure to brace that tub up before cutting the panels out!
This is good advice, thank you!
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Old 12-19-2016, 10:43 PM   #21 (permalink)
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I wanted to install an aftercooler on the compressor because I'm going to do some sand blasting and I eventually want to paint the Jeep myself. For those that don't know, the idea is that the aftercooler lowers the temperature of the air leaving the pump to the point where you can extract the moisture from the air before it enters the tank. This turned into a much larger project than I expected.

First, here is the cooler I bought. It's a Hayden 1290 heavy duty oil cooler. I've seen some people use the 1260 on compressor setups. This one didn't cost much more; I figured bigger would be better.



It has 3/4" NPT fittings. A lot of the coolers that are available have 1/4" fittings. The compressor has 1/2" fittings. I was worried that a cooler with smaller fittings might interfere with air flow.



I also bought a 3/4" auto drain filter from TP Tools. Bonus regulator shot. It's mostly metal, seems to be of decent quality. I can't tell you how well it works yet.





These rubber things are how you're supposed to mount the cooler.



They came with T-Nuts and a screw. When you tighten the screw it pushes in on the rubber and causes it to expand. This makes them snug up to the cooler.




I wanted to have the cooler and filter mount to the compressor so that it is one self contained unit. I figured I needed a frame.



I ended up widening it more than what is shown below. I didn't like the idea of needing to mount it with a lot of precision, but this gives you an idea of how it went together.

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Old 12-19-2016, 10:44 PM   #22 (permalink)
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The frame is the same height as the cooler. I feel like this gives it some level of protection, but I think I'm going to eventually need to make a grill.



I needed to make some risers for the mounts. Step 1 was a jig.



Step 2 was cut them all out.



Step 3 was line them up and attach them.






The next step was to curse a lot and drill holes (slowly).




Next I had to figure out somewhere on the compressor to mount this monstrosity.

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Old 12-19-2016, 10:45 PM   #23 (permalink)
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Looks about right.



Drilled it.



This is the point where I started to get a sense of scale.



I added a top support that attaches to a bolt on the top of the pump. It shares the mounting point with the belt guard.



Here it is after being completely welded up and wire wheeled.





Rustoleum tan is a decent color match.



And now we need another jig to cut out the actual mounting brackets. I should have done the first jig on the table. It was much better.



Chopped and drilled.

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Old 12-19-2016, 10:45 PM   #24 (permalink)
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And painted. It was very cold out.



Now it's starting to look like something.




It didn't tip over!




Moving onto the filter. I ended up spending a small fortune on brass fittings for this project. If I were to do it again I'm not sure I would have used copper tubing. I also would have bought a filter with 1/2" fittings in order to cut down on the number of adapters I needed.



Here's where I'm going with this thing. Hopefully all of the condensation drains into the filter because it is the lowest point in the system.



Cleaned up bracket.



It apparently takes a while for paint to dry when its 35 degrees outside. Had a little whoopsy.



Next step was to hook up all the copper tubing. The factory copper uses flared ends (see the picture below). I used compression fittings to attach the copper tube to the cooler and the filter.


Last edited by Dominick C; 12-19-2016 at 11:07 PM.
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Old 12-19-2016, 10:46 PM   #25 (permalink)
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I also ended up using compression unions to attach the new tubing to the old flared ends. It seemed less risky than trying to get the fittings out of the pump and tank. They both have some sort of hardened sealant on them.



I originally purchased parts to have the pipe exit straight forward from the front. When I subsequently realized I needed an elbow, it resulted in the mess of adapters you see here.

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