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Old 09-15-2018, 09:22 AM   #1 (permalink)
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Should I grind & reweld?

Last night I welded a control arm bracket on. To be honest when I look at it this morning I am not happy with it. I don't think I had it set hot enough.
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Old 09-15-2018, 09:23 AM   #2 (permalink)
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Old 09-15-2018, 09:28 AM   #3 (permalink)
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Yes you should.
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Old 09-15-2018, 09:34 AM   #4 (permalink)
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grind it out and practice off the truck with the welder first. You moved way too fast and not enough heat into the piece
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Old 09-15-2018, 09:36 AM   #5 (permalink)
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Quit trying to make a smooth slug weld. Get a nice pattern goin and try in both pieces. That weld is plenty hot but u weren’t directly in the root and we’re moving to fast so it’s not tied in everything.
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Old 09-15-2018, 09:43 AM   #6 (permalink)
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okay will do. I had some nice welds when practicing. Then when I went to weld it up, it went sideways. Practice welding on a bench vs welding laying under an axle is totally different.

If I am welding to a cold axle tube, I should increase the heat vs would you normally would have it set at for 3/16?
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Old 09-15-2018, 12:08 PM   #7 (permalink)
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I think for safety sake of this project(wife's Jeep). It's going to be tacked in place then let a skilled welder weld it up.


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Old 09-15-2018, 03:25 PM   #8 (permalink)
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I think for safety sake of this project(wife's Jeep). It's going to be tacked in place then let a skilled welder weld it up.


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Just practice man. I’ve seen way worse welds hold and although yours would probably be fine it only takes a few minutes to grind it down and weld over it. If your worried grind a v into the seem of the brackets and tube and put a nice hot root pass down first. I wouldn’t give up is all I’m sayin Your welds definetly arent horrible.
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Old 09-15-2018, 03:49 PM   #9 (permalink)
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Just practice man. I’ve seen way worse welds hold and although yours would probably be fine it only takes a few minutes to grind it down and weld over it. If your worried grind a v into the seem of the brackets and tube and put a nice hot root pass down first. I wouldn’t give up is all I’m sayin Your welds definetly arent horrible.
X2, when I do .25 I run beads on both sides if possible
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Old 09-15-2018, 04:16 PM   #10 (permalink)
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It looks like you were moving too fast because the edge of the stack is ">" shaped, when it should have been more ")" shaped. Maybe try a triangle/christmas tree weave to help slow down.

Was this burnt with a 110v or 220v?
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Old 09-15-2018, 04:36 PM   #11 (permalink)
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when i do 1/4" i bevel pretty good so that i can fit 3 passes worth of weld in there.

'odds are' it would be fine, or fail slowly enough that you can notice it before death, but if you have the time, now is the time to do it again.
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Old 09-15-2018, 05:01 PM   #12 (permalink)
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It was done with 220v, .03 wire on a Miller mp215. Had it autoset for 3/16 mild.

I grabbed a bunch of steel to practice my pattern on before I attempt it again. I have 2 frame brackets & 1 more axle brackets to do.

When I ground it down a bit, it looked like it had good contact with both the axle & bracket.

No air pockets like some of the factory welds.

Thanks for the advice & tips.



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Old 09-15-2018, 05:12 PM   #13 (permalink)
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It was done with 220v, .03 wire on a Miller mp215. Had it autoset for 3/16 mild.

I grabbed a bunch of steel to practice my pattern on before I attempt it again. I have 2 frame brackets & 1 more axle brackets to do.

When I ground it down a bit, it looked like it had good contact with both the axle & bracket.

No air pockets like some of the factory welds.

Thanks for the advice & tips.



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i'm sure it looked good inside, but you can clearly tell from looking at the back side that it is not all the way through and possibly only half or less of the base metal thickness actually welded.

so yeah, it was probably as good as a factory weld, but that isn't good enough for anybody else
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Old 09-15-2018, 05:38 PM   #14 (permalink)
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Practice welds.





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Old 09-15-2018, 07:10 PM   #15 (permalink)
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alright, now take a cutoff and wheel and cut across all of them perpendicular (like how subway cuts your sandwhich in two after they assemble it)

just by looking at the cut edge, you can probably see where the weld is relative to the unwelded metal pretty easily. might need to sand it. in lieu of acid, try and spray some vinager on it, might highlight where the heat lines are.

that will tell you how far you are getting into the metal and you can adjust your settings from there, or adjust your material prep by V-ing it out to get the thickness down


they all look nice and straight
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Old 09-16-2018, 09:18 AM   #16 (permalink)
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Running beads on flat plate is not good practice. You need to roughly replicate the actual work piece: a fillet weld on a 90° joint with the similar thickness materials, and the same orientation (vertical, overhead, etc.). You could substitute plate for tubing if you don't have any scrap.
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Old 09-16-2018, 09:40 AM   #17 (permalink)
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Running beads on flat plate is not good practice. You need to roughly replicate the actual work piece: a fillet weld on a 90° joint with the similar thickness materials, and the same orientation (vertical, overhead, etc.). You could substitute plate for tubing if you don't have any scrap.


Yeah makes sense. I plan on getting some 1/4 or 3/8 flat bar & start doing different kind of joints.

I find I do rush a bit & need to slow down. Also I need to readjust more for a better position & not be afraid to stop & start a weld.


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Old 09-16-2018, 09:53 AM   #18 (permalink)
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I still have that problem, I just want to knock out a project and rush to get it done. But if it's an "unusual" joint, or I'm rusty from not welding for a while, it really pays to get in some practice. Otherwise you risk making junk instead of the desired part !
You bring up another good point, if you can't position yourself to see the weld puddle, and have a reasonably comfortable welding position, you are unlikely to have quality results.
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Old 09-16-2018, 09:57 AM   #19 (permalink)
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Id weld the inside, take a break to piss, and then lay two big ol fat caterpillars over the outside weld.
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Old 09-17-2018, 05:06 AM   #20 (permalink)
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Running beads on flat plate is not good practice. You need to roughly replicate the actual work piece: a fillet weld on a 90° joint with the similar thickness materials, and the same orientation (vertical, overhead, etc.). You could substitute plate for tubing if you don't have any scrap.
This.

Either practice vertical or pull the axle and weld it horizontal.
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Old 09-17-2018, 10:28 AM   #21 (permalink)
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This.

Either practice vertical or pull the axle and weld it horizontal.
If hes doing link mounts I would think the axle is already loose. Needs to burn them in on the bench instead of trying to overhead
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Old 09-17-2018, 01:22 PM   #22 (permalink)
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Yeah makes sense. I plan on getting some 1/4 or 3/8 flat bar & start doing different kind of joints.

I find I do rush a bit & need to slow down. Also I need to readjust more for a better position & not be afraid to stop & start a weld.


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To help control the speed of your hand, try to keep the beat/rhythm of your hand movement in your head as you move your hand back and forth, 1-2, 1-2, 1-2.......
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Old 09-17-2018, 06:48 PM   #23 (permalink)
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Practice welds.





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Practice this as much as possible! Tighten up the welds and practice laying them next to each other and overlapping them halfway (does that make sense?)
Then go on top of welds and lay beads other way (think checkerboard) the weld on the far right in the pic looks good.. your not staying in the end of the puddle long enough also.. thats why there's a divit at the end of weld.
Kudos to you for welding uphill. That's the way it should be laid. Your weld is nowhere near as strong as the factory welds. You need to grind out and try again.. make sure you expose the root crack as well when grinding.

Last edited by POR; 09-17-2018 at 07:05 PM.
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Old 09-17-2018, 06:52 PM   #24 (permalink)
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alright, now take a cutoff and wheel and cut across all of them perpendicular (like how subway cuts your sandwhich in two after they assemble it)

just by looking at the cut edge, you can probably see where the weld is relative to the unwelded metal pretty easily. might need to sand it. in lieu of acid, try and spray some vinager on it, might highlight where the heat lines are.

that will tell you how far you are getting into the metal and you can adjust your settings from there, or adjust your material prep by V-ing it out to get the thickness down


they all look nice and straight
You can't do what your talking about on flat welds.. your talking about 2 beveled pieces with backer plate and ypu have to bend the welds to see if they fail
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Old 09-17-2018, 06:58 PM   #25 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by stephen wilson View Post
Running beads on flat plate is not good practice. You need to roughly replicate the actual work piece: a fillet weld on a 90° joint with the similar thickness materials, and the same orientation (vertical, overhead, etc.). You could substitute plate for tubing if you don't have any scrap.
You have absolutely no idea what your talking about! Do the world a favor and quit giving welding advice, you do not know how to weld!!! The first thing you do in welding school is weld on plate just as he has done. It teaches puddle control and feel.

Last edited by POR; 09-17-2018 at 06:59 PM.
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