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Topic Review (Newest First)
12-15-2009 12:33 PM
Caswell Digging down for traction will only get you so far. Even just 24" of snow, your front axle becomes a plow. Every inch more, is an inch more your axle tries to push. If you go hardcore snow wheeling around here, you can hit 10' of snow. Good luck digging for traction in that.

As for trails getting "iced over", I've only really noticed that from rigs that are pushing their limit. A capable rig should be crawling up (no ice), or have good wheel spin and good progress (no ice). The thing causing ice is wheel spin, and wheel spin only creates ice problems if you aren't making (enough) forward progress while you have wheel spin.
12-15-2009 09:35 AM
Haggar
Quote:
Originally Posted by cruiserjg View Post
Dont forget that the maxxas tire were 40" C. C. Was the only rig with 4ds.

And for the boggers you have on the back they will help.
This makes a lot more sense, doubt anyone but bryce is running treps and those are turds in the snow. Jim or Stan or one of the others running 40" CCs, non stickies, thats different, those are better in the snow. (Yes, lol @ Michigan, we have so few people running Maxxis, we usually know them all).


The area that this trail ride is, its usually 12-24" of snow. All you need to do is air down to where you think you should be, and then air down some more. And hammer down, don't stop moving until you are somewhere you can safely stop.

I don't like boggers in the snow that much, but tire pressure I think is more important than tread, and grooving can help a lot.
12-15-2009 09:27 AM
DirtBag7-11
Quote:
Originally Posted by GearMan View Post
LOL douchebag i was thinking the same 24" must be a mis type 24' might slow a crew down hahaha.on second thought. NOT. only a empty bottle o booze stoped us eheh.
12-15-2009 08:36 AM
GearMan
Quote:
Originally Posted by DirtBag7-11 View Post
This is dumb douche bag, 24" of snow and nobody can make it without chains , well then you have no buisness being there ! ya got know clue what your doing

As far as the guys that went best got down to traction well then your not really snow wheelin are ya , I guess if your haulin frieght and have to get some where chains are the way to go but if your out to go wheeling in the snow chains do nothing to make it better
LOL douchebag i was thinking the same 24" must be a mis type 24' might slow a crew down hahaha.on second thought. NOT. only a empty bottle o booze stoped us eheh.
12-15-2009 08:28 AM
cruiserjg
Quote:
Originally Posted by pfreer3 View Post
Thanks for the douche answers bitches. (except Jess) Last year I ran a trail up in Michigan, had about 24" of snow on the trail. To me it looked as if the guys that ran the best got down to traction. Guy that did the best had Maxxis trepadors, they looked like a saw going through pine. I'm sure you're right about dig fest, guess I'll judge based on how deep the snow is. Nobody on the trail I was on was floating, even though everybody aired down.
Dont forget that the maxxas tire were 40" C. C. Was the only rig with 4ds.

And for the boggers you have on the back they will help.
12-15-2009 08:09 AM
DirtBag7-11
Quote:
Originally Posted by pfreer3 View Post
Thanks for the douche answers bitches. (except Jess) Last year I ran a trail up in Michigan, had about 24" of snow on the trail. To me it looked as if the guys that ran the best got down to traction. Guy that did the best had Maxxis trepadors, they looked like a saw going through pine. I'm sure you're right about dig fest, guess I'll judge based on how deep the snow is. Nobody on the trail I was on was floating, even though everybody aired down.
This is dumb douche bag, 24" of snow and nobody can make it without chains , well then you have no buisness being there ! ya got know clue what your doing

As far as the guys that went best got down to traction well then your not really snow wheelin are ya , I guess if your haulin frieght and have to get some where chains are the way to go but if your out to go wheeling in the snow chains do nothing to make it better
12-14-2009 04:58 PM
cslimfu I have always found they work the best on the front end if youre only gonna put them on one end. As far as hill climbs, that might be a little different story. Its kinda like a front wheel drive in mud compaired to a rear wheel drive. The rear digs to push the front and you cant really steer all that well. Just my .02 worth on what works here.
12-14-2009 04:56 PM
uglyscout The only guys I've seen run chains in the snow are the trucks that are too heavy to float and/or too under powered to hammer it.

BUT - I've run chains on non 4x4 trips trying to get to work/ get around town in the ice - and from my experience I'd run max air pressure. Runs lots of bungees and check them often. Nothing sucks worse than a loose chain breaking and whipping around and taking out a brake line or a fender...
12-14-2009 04:35 PM
pfreer3 We were 4 trucks back from the guy with the trepadors, so I got a pretty good view of how they worked. He was breaking trail. They basically dug in until they got to some traction. Sounds like there are two schools of thought. Float or intentionally dig. I've heard say the Iroks are an awesome snow tire, which would float, but I've not seen them run personally.

I grew up in Northern Michigan, but never went snow wheeling until I came down here to Kentucky (go figure). Honestly it was a really awesome trip, and can't wait to make the trip this year.
I also didn't see a single person running chains at Snofari, which I was suprised about, hope nobody starts bitching about them tearing up trail or something stupid like that.

Thanks for the info on the tire pressure, we had that problem as well, most people ran too much air, and wanted to string out 300feet of winch cable on every hill
12-14-2009 04:30 PM
Stephen Chains have saved my butt more than once, in snow and mud. The one mud time was on the super slick bentonite in canyonlands when I had 33" bfg ats, we just drove through it and it could have been flat dangerous without.

In snow we plow with a chained up K30 and get some serious work done and don't get a fraction of the traction without the chains.

They just make the tires dig and grab, if that's what you need, great. If you want to float, don't bother.

We have a friend/customer up in aspen that's out on the snow for weeks out of the year and swears by some of the swedish diamond pattern chains on his 40" mtr's. I haven't been out with him but those that go say it's pretty impressive.

We use equipment chains that we shortened to fit some 33's on the plow truck, they're pretty beefy compared to normal pickup type chains. We've had sets that we added a full set of extra crosslinks into, they were nice since they didn't have the gaps to slip around on. We also run 3-4 bungees per wheel to keep them tight and out of the brakes. Carry spare bungees.
12-14-2009 12:54 PM
Haggar Cant' say I've ever seen anyone run chains up here on a trail ride. That area that Snofari is run, don't usually have too much depth, ice is often an issue. I'm suprised you made that comment about the Treps, I believe I know which vehicle you are talking about and he regularly complains that those tires are completely worthless in the snow, due to the compound freezing up.

If you want to improve your snow traction, groove the hell out of your boggers, if you haven't already. Even on hard stuff, I always would run low pressures and float. My last truck was running 14.5 wide SXs (38.5 tall), run at 4psi, heavily grooved, no problems in any michigan snow, as long as the beat 22RE could turn the tires.

When we have newbies on our runs, they always end up running too much pressure. Boggers tend to dig in the snow no matter what, though.
12-14-2009 12:50 PM
jperecko I know this is mainly for snow but while on offroad chains... I have seen people using chains for really goopy mud in South America and it seemed to make a pretty dramatic difference.
12-14-2009 12:42 PM
onetoncv Could not make a snow ball HUH Camo it suprises me - I think things are changing - the snow we get will be different than we can recall- there are so many types of snow we can only really generally talk about conditions . Jess
12-14-2009 12:24 PM
pfreer3 [QUOTE=Triaged;10728723]I have never done chains on all 4. Doing a trail as a club run with a bunch of heavy rigs caused the first few trucks to pack down the snow into ice. It was either chains or winch for the guys after that on the hills.

I still need to lengthen my chains for my Graplers.

These are from years ago in SoCal where we don't get much snow.
No Chains


Chains rear


Thats kind of what we were running into, once the trail was broken there was a crapload of wheelspin, and winching. Running low tire air was key, but still not good till you got down to something hard. I'm headed up to Michigan again in January to attend Snofari, put on by some of the Greatlakes 4wd association. I bought 1pair of chains, (from tirechains.com) and guess I'll start with about 10psi with the chains torqued down so they don't spin. I'm running 35X14.50 boggers in back, so my other issue is crabwalking on sidehills with a locker. Hopefully the chains help. I can always take them back off I guess.
Thanks for the non-bullshit replys...
12-14-2009 11:35 AM
KyleQ I purchased some chains for some winter wheeling I did back a few years ago - it had gotten warm, melted snow and then froze hard, creating an icy mess on the hills of Apple Valley Farms. I went through most of day 1 on air down'd BFG A/T's but day 2 I couldn't make it up to some of the trail entrances it was so slick.

Straight up nasty climbs in the summer, add ice and snow and they are pretty damn crazy. It's hard to walk up these hills when it is dry, let alone covered in snow.



I didn't air down with the chains - I needed all the clearance I could get, my chains worked very well and didn't get loose.


Chains on all 4 tires, with chains you need to run air pressure, otherwise they will slip, fall off or beat the shit out of everything around them.


Haha - these pictures were back when life was simple and my rig was small.
12-14-2009 10:57 AM
Triaged I have never done chains on all 4. Doing a trail as a club run with a bunch of heavy rigs caused the first few trucks to pack down the snow into ice. It was either chains or winch for the guys after that on the hills.

I still need to lengthen my chains for my Graplers.

These are from years ago in SoCal where we don't get much snow.
No Chains


Chains rear
12-14-2009 10:48 AM
camo
Quote:
Originally Posted by onetoncv View Post
I The snow Camo was plowin was a fresh warmer make a snow ball type of snow the kind we live for .
99 out of 100 times that would be true for here. however that snow in my video was a rare treat for us in the lower sierra. it was utah dry powder.

it was 18* out that night and the snow was so light and dry that I was able to sweep 24" off my deck with a broom rather then shovel it. was unable to make a snow ball with it. just wouldn't stick.
12-14-2009 09:18 AM
onetoncv I will be the first to admit in some situations chains are nice -But its few and far for the west - where you are frozen is the norm -it shows freezes -and freezes again -ultra frozen . Now we get 18 degree's and snowing -sideways at times , But the best storms are wetter and a tad warmer otherwise its just crap to wheel in. The snow Camo was plowin was a fresh warmer make a snow ball type of snow the kind we live for . I've been back to New york and Maine both in winter months and let me tell you its dry type snow and not terribly wheelable . Jess
12-14-2009 08:41 AM
pfreer3 Thanks for the douche answers bitches. (except Jess) Last year I ran a trail up in Michigan, had about 24" of snow on the trail. To me it looked as if the guys that ran the best got down to traction. Guy that did the best had Maxxis trepadors, they looked like a saw going through pine. I'm sure you're right about dig fest, guess I'll judge based on how deep the snow is. Nobody on the trail I was on was floating, even though everybody aired down.
12-14-2009 08:19 AM
onetoncv Chains in my opinion are mainly for ice or real crusty type iced to hell snow - air up chaain up all 4 -and enjoy the holes diggin fest in the snow we haul arse in - Jess
12-14-2009 07:34 AM
JeepCrawler98 I've heard it works best if you wrap the chains around your axle and drive shafts around all sides?
12-14-2009 07:06 AM
DirtBag7-11
12-14-2009 06:55 AM
pfreer3
OFF road snow chain use....

Just wondering peoples experience
all 4 tires?, or only rear 2?
Which works best?
a. air down, tighten chain, air up?
b. Full pressure, and tighten chain?
c. air down, and tighten chain?

I'm thinking c. right now....

Thanks

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