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Topic Review (Newest First)
08-21-2019 12:55 PM
redneckengineered Found a video of [email protected] working on his transom

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f1Qz73_m0_o
08-20-2019 12:24 PM
EverNoob Wow you beat everyone. That's almost the perfect trolling boat. No it actually is perfect, it would be worse brand-new.
08-20-2019 06:21 AM
[email protected]
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Mindless View Post
And maybe taking off the winter tarp framework? ��

Sounds like a hell of an upgrade from that sort of leak. Damn
That's actually part of a jumbo planer board setup I rigged up. Eyelets in the tops carry rope to the planer boards. No, it wouldn't have killed me to throw a coat of paint on it. I plan on making one out of some stainless steel conduit, but not this year.
08-19-2019 12:21 PM
Mr. Mindless And maybe taking off the winter tarp framework? ��

Sounds like a hell of an upgrade from that sort of leak. Damn
08-19-2019 11:21 AM
[email protected] Built a "thickness" jig for the router, took inner panel down till I had 1-5/8" thickness (into the seacast because I spaced it too thick).


Built back up to 2-1/8" with CSM and 1708.


Filled floors with arjay 6011, taped all joints with two layers of 4" 1708, covered entire floor, stringers, and inner transom panel with a layer of CSM, then painted with two coats of rustoleum gloss white after sanding and an acetone wipe.

Drilled and glassed in stainless drain tubes for the outside bilges to drain into the center, and resined and flared in a new bilge drain tube.


On the water before the snow flew!




I didn't get any pictures of the final assembly due to the urgency. Went from an empty hull to ready to hit the water in about 24 hours wednesday afternoon/thursday with the help of a bunch of drunken degenerates. Got it out for fishing saturday afternoon and found a few dumb lake trout for dinner. All that work, money, and time and the only noticeable difference is that the bilge is bone dry instead of leaking ~1/2 gallon a minuet. O well, I feel better about it anyway!

Now I have to work on the cosmetic repair of the boat, and at some point a repaint of the boat
08-06-2019 08:53 AM
Hubbler Yeah, looking into it more the splines are the same but may run into issues with shaft input length. Alphas all mount up the same until the gen 2 came out. I'll keep a look out for a bravo.
08-06-2019 05:58 AM
[email protected]
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stuckntx View Post
Its not a Bravo. It says alpha in the title. Looking at the upper its either an early alpha or a 1 drive.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hubbler View Post
That is most certainly a gen 1 alpha. Could also be a MR but same thing... It should fit your #1 or "pre-alpha" transom mount however I believe the shaft splines are different. Not really that much of an upgrade. If you want a bravo, their abundant down here but not that cheap.
Yea, I texted him asking if he was sure it was a Bravo and he apologized and said he'd change the listing. The ad used to say Bravo.

Hubble, pretty sure all mercruiser splines are the same as are the dimensions and transom patterns, with the exception of the top two added holes for the bravo's. Keep an eye out, I'm not in any rush but if you find a decent deal on a bravo, or whole parts boat, let me know. I'd need everything but the long block. An LS swap would be several years out, but it never hurts to have more crap laying around.
P.S. I'm doing everything I can to have this thing on the water in time for next week's shindig.
08-05-2019 08:03 PM
Hubbler
Quote:
Originally Posted by [email protected] View Post
Umm, I'm looking closer at the pictures and I don't think that's a Bravo, looks like the same drive I have. Any outdrive experts?
That is most certainly a gen 1 alpha. Could also be a MR but same thing... It should fit your #1 or "pre-alpha" transom mount however I believe the shaft splines are different. Not really that much of an upgrade. If you want a bravo, they're abundant down here but not that cheap.
08-05-2019 06:51 PM
Stuckntx
Quote:
Originally Posted by [email protected] View Post
Umm, I'm looking closer at the pictures and I don't think that's a Bravo, looks like the same drive I have. Any outdrive experts?


Made a lot of progress this weekend, took almost no pics.
I did make a "slab mill" out of a router and some angle iron to flatten out the outer skin. I'm laying layers of 1708 and then milling them off with the router and a 3/4" mortising bit. Then I'm going back and adding more 1708 wherever the router didn't hit. Once it's flat I'll cover the whole area in a layer of mat, sand, then finally PAINT!

Interior is almost done, probably have it wrapped up and bilge painted by wednesday.
Its not a Bravo. It says alpha in the title. Looking at the upper its either an early alpha or a 1 drive.
08-05-2019 07:54 AM
[email protected]
Quote:
Originally Posted by [email protected] View Post
Not that I need to add any more delays, but I found an entire bravo outdrive setup for $400, fairly local. Tempted...

I'd have to add a seawater pump to the 302, but power steering would be sweet and it would be ready to go should I ever LS swap it.

https://up.craigslist.org/bpo/d/bark...930255293.html
Umm, I'm looking closer at the pictures and I don't think that's a Bravo, looks like the same drive I have. Any outdrive experts?


Made a lot of progress this weekend, took almost no pics.
I did make a "slab mill" out of a router and some angle iron to flatten out the outer skin. I'm laying layers of 1708 and then milling them off with the router and a 3/4" mortising bit. Then I'm going back and adding more 1708 wherever the router didn't hit. Once it's flat I'll cover the whole area in a layer of mat, sand, then finally PAINT!

Interior is almost done, probably have it wrapped up and bilge painted by wednesday.

08-02-2019 01:47 PM
Joe_W
Quote:
Originally Posted by [email protected] View Post
Mine is what I think was called a "1 drive" or some people have called it a pre-alpha. It's basically an alpha. From everything I've read, the Bravo was created because the alpha's weren't lasting behind 454's. I believe Bravo's are superior to the alpha's in most ways. The alpha to bravo swap only requires drilling two additional mounting holes in the transom, and installing a seawater pump on the engine.
quite possibly I had that reversed, carry on
08-02-2019 12:54 PM
HankScorpi0
Quote:
Originally Posted by [email protected] View Post
IDK, I'd rather not total it all up till I'm on the water so it hurts less.

I'm guessing I've spent just shy of $2000 on materials so far for the transom, floor, and engine mount stringers. Also bought a new swim platform and I'll need to buy paint yet.
I'm sure I'll have $2500 into this old boat before it's on the water. Looking forward to having a solid platform to put some more work and money into that actually shows like paint, electronics, fishing gear, etc.

Did a bunch more work on it last night, no pics though.
Will you attempt to paint on your own?
08-02-2019 12:15 PM
[email protected]
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jam Master Jay View Post
I've long wondered this. Why do they use shitty wood in any portion of an object that is intended to go in the water? Why can't the just use fiberglass or plastic shapes for all that stuff?

Boats are obviously designed to disintegrate as fast as possible so dumb boat people have to buy another.
Balsa or plywood core fiberglass is a really strong, light, conformable, and inexpensive composite so it's an attractive way to make a new boat.
But yea, one leaky screw below the waterline seals the fate of the core. There is now way for it to dry out. Some mfg's are now using composite cores, but not in my price range and it does make for a little heavier boat.
08-02-2019 12:12 PM
[email protected]
Quote:
Originally Posted by HankScorpi0 View Post
Man that's a lot of work! Nice job! What do you think you have into it for materials so far?
IDK, I'd rather not total it all up till I'm on the water so it hurts less.

I'm guessing I've spent just shy of $2000 on materials so far for the transom, floor, and engine mount stringers. Also bought a new swim platform and I'll need to buy paint yet.
I'm sure I'll have $2500 into this old boat before it's on the water. Looking forward to having a solid platform to put some more work and money into that actually shows like paint, electronics, fishing gear, etc.

Did a bunch more work on it last night, no pics though.
08-02-2019 12:05 PM
[email protected]
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe_W View Post
I don't remember what outdrive you had on it but I didn't think Bravos were all that desirable
Mine is what I think was called a "1 drive" or some people have called it a pre-alpha. It's basically an alpha. From everything I've read, the Bravo was created because the alpha's weren't lasting behind 454's. I believe Bravo's are superior to the alpha's in most ways. The alpha to bravo swap only requires drilling two additional mounting holes in the transom, and installing a seawater pump on the engine.
08-02-2019 12:03 PM
Jam Master Jay
Quote:
Originally Posted by Action Fab View Post
I new boat is a minimum of $25k and typically start at $80k for anything decent. I realize a lot of the cost is in the powertrain. But damn, what's $600 worth of material and $35 an hour for a fabricator to work in house?

All rhetorical. Just venting. I don't understand some of the corners companies in the craftsmanship business cut.
I've long wondered this. Why do they use shitty wood in any portion of an object that is intended to go in the water? Why can't the just use fiberglass or plastic shapes for all that stuff?

Boats are obviously designed to disintegrate as fast as possible so dumb boat people have to buy another.
08-02-2019 10:14 AM
Joe_W
Quote:
Originally Posted by [email protected] View Post
Not that I need to add any more delays, but I found an entire bravo outdrive setup for $400, fairly local. Tempted...

I'd have to add a seawater pump to the 302, but power steering would be sweet and it would be ready to go should I ever LS swap it.

https://up.craigslist.org/bpo/d/bark...930255293.html
I don't remember what outdrive you had on it but I didn't think Bravos were all that desirable
08-02-2019 10:10 AM
HankScorpi0
Quote:
Originally Posted by [email protected] View Post
Not that I need to add any more delays, but I found an entire bravo outdrive setup for $400, fairly local. Tempted...

I'd have to add a seawater pump to the 302, but power steering would be sweet and it would be ready to go should I ever LS swap it.

https://up.craigslist.org/bpo/d/bark...930255293.html
Man that's a lot of work! Nice job! What do you think you have into it for materials so far?
08-02-2019 10:01 AM
[email protected] Not that I need to add any more delays, but I found an entire bravo outdrive setup for $400, fairly local. Tempted...

I'd have to add a seawater pump to the 302, but power steering would be sweet and it would be ready to go should I ever LS swap it.

https://up.craigslist.org/bpo/d/bark...930255293.html
07-29-2019 08:00 AM
Mr. Mindless 3rd of july 2020, no problem boss!
07-29-2019 07:37 AM
[email protected] Pressing on...

Glassed inner panel back in and all parts back together, glassed in seacast spacers to the new 1.5" center panel thickness and tapered spacers at the outer parts of the transom down to 1/2" to meet the parts I hadn't removed.


Then I ground down the outerpanel and enlarged it by 1/8", and wrapped 1708 out to out through the IO hole. I had ordered no-wax resin through amazon but JD screwed up my order an sent finishing resin instead so I had to use thickened no-wax resin I bought from local shower mfg. It had fumed silica filler in it and really setup hard.



No pics, but I ended up cutting 12"x 1" slots in each of the gunwhale cubbys through to the transom, then glassing in 1708 to make them connect. I then made some funnels to fill into those and spaced the transom out a little there. Made pouring much easier.

Had a pouring party saturday


The transom took 15 gallons, I put the leftover in the floor and floated the old panels back in. Wasn't enough to put the starboard panel in so I've got more stuff ordered and will get than in when it gets here. I didn't take pics, but I also cut the engine bed stringers open and dug out all the old plywood, cut 1.5" OD holes in the bottom of them, then filled with seacast.


Lessons learned:
Seacast looked like it would be too thick to pour into a 1/2" gap but once it starts to slump up it flows very well. Somewhat akin to pouring concrete when you start to screed it. Any little pinhole will leak out goo so have gorilla tape ready to stop leaks. I had used clear packing tape over a couple of bolt holes so I could see when the seacast got to it to make sure it was moving. This proved unnecessary and it melted the tape so I quickly got thicker tape on everything.
I have the back of the boat suspended off the trailer with chain hoists so that the floor evened out for doing the pours. I was surprised that the seacast was actually liquid enough that material was flowing from the high funnel to the low funnel, I couldn't figure out what was going on at first till my old man noted the boat wasn't quite level. I adjusted the chain hoists and sure enough it leveled right out. This makes me quite confident that there are no air pockets left.
You can hit the transom with a ball peen hammer now and it sounds like you're hitting a 2" thick piece of aluminum. Over all I'm happy with the stuff, good to have extra people on hand though. I had two people dedicated solely to tapping on the outer skin with rubber mallets which helps speed up the pouring. It started heating up about 10 mins after we were done pouring and got REALLY hot, parts of it were almost too hot to touch, guessing 120F+. Ambient temps in the mid 70's and everything was in the shade.
I ordered 4 1-gallon pails of Arjay 6011 for doing the rest of the hard to reach floor panels because it's thinner and should do a better job of self leveling through a small hole. And it's cheaper than seacast and faster to get.

I'm not going to make my July 3rd target date, but I'm getting there. I'm HOPING to start getting the engine in next weekend.
07-09-2019 01:58 PM
[email protected]
Quote:
Originally Posted by Talon2006 View Post
I am wondering what the difference is of going from the outside vs the inside.

I had only seen it done from the inside before this.
If you don't have access to the inside, you can take the outside off but it's generally discouraged. The inner panel is a thinner piece of glass than the outer panel and it's usually put on after the plywood is set in the hull. The outer "panel" is actually the hull, so when you cut it you need to do more work to fix it to make it as strong as it needs to be, plus now you have to make it look good. Nobody will see inside joints so you can concentrate on strength alone.

The glass I'm putting on the core side of the panels isn't really necessary but I figured why not as long as I'm here.
Once the core is poured and cured I'll wrap the I/O hole with biaxial/mat, then I'll tape all the connections between the inner panel and the hull with 3" tape, then cover the entire inner panel with one great big piece of biaxial, 4" past it to the hull at all the joints. Also going to cover the outer skin near the I/O hole in biaxial/mat and then mat then gelcoat.

This will make the inner skin twice as thick, the outer skin twice as thick, and the core twice as thick and from a material 3x stronger than new. I'm shooting for a total 2-1/16" thick transom with no external spacers vs. the original 1-1/8" with plywood spacers.

I am design protecting myself in case the original motor ever goes out, I can build up a 400hp LQ4 without worrying about the transom. Would make for a fun sleeper.
07-09-2019 12:28 PM
nahmus
Quote:
Originally Posted by KacksterK5 View Post
A+ on the use of a minibike in the process
Ever take that thing off any sweet jumps?
07-09-2019 12:05 PM
Talon2006 I am wondering what the difference is of going from the outside vs the inside.

I had only seen it done from the inside before this.
07-09-2019 11:31 AM
TiTRD
Quote:
Originally Posted by ky scrambled View Post
You just went a totally redeemed yourself!
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