Elk hunt fall 2020 - Page 2 - Pirate4x4.Com : 4x4 and Off-Road Forum
 
Pirate4x4.Com : 4x4 and Off-Road Forum  

Go Back   Pirate4x4.Com : 4x4 and Off-Road Forum > Miscellaneous > Outdoor Sports and Recreation
Notices

Reply
 
Share LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 03-24-2019, 09:09 AM   #26 (permalink)
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Member # 159303
Posts: 210
Quote:
Originally Posted by v6toy4x View Post
Just specifically answering his question/comments

I agree it is not as much of a sure deal as it was years ago, my famiily still hunts there every year have lived up in that country for generations, my grandpa built the chalet in enchanted valley. There is still land that produces.
That's cool your GPa built the chalet. We probably know some of the same people then. Great GPa moved to the Harbor started trucking in the 40's, my family has been hunting around Quinault for 60+ years. There's still productive land, but it changes year to year, and takes a lot of scouting. It's been a wet fart the last 10 years or so, and a lot of the regular crew no longer bother. I don't use guides or buy access permits, and never will, but it might be a good idea for a non-resident.
YZRider is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-24-2019, 09:38 AM   #27 (permalink)
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2001
Member # 7412
Location: ft worth texas, aguilar colorado
Posts: 6,417
i am hoping to go on a elk hunt in the next year or two. in southern Colorado by my place, it has a shit ton of elk and not that much population. but i have only been there during bow season, never rifle. but i would start out in the local bar if you want to be successful.
__________________
m35A2C 4x4 sitting on 49" R2s,suburban 454/465/205 43" ag tires,Durango on tons and 40s
gunracer1 is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Sponsored Links
Old 03-24-2019, 12:39 PM   #28 (permalink)
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Member # 50525
Location: Tallahassee, FL
Posts: 2,616
I did my first elk hunt this past year, it was also my first western packpack hunt. We did 7 days in CO in an OTC archery unit, I drew a muzzleloader tag as I’m not super confident with my bow.

We hiked in 5 miles and set up camp, the next day my buddy ended up killing a 5x5 with his bow. I ended up missing a cow on the second to last day of the trip, so I considered it very successful besides my poor shooting.

IMO, you need to decide whether you’re wanting to go with a guide and have a higher chance of killing an elk, or going DIY, whether you want to use a bow, rifle, or muzzleloader, if you want a bull or are ok with a cow, and which part of the season you will want to hunt given weather, the rut, etc. Then look at your available options.

If you’re going by yourself, backpack hunting unguided isn’t really an option unless you can find horse packers to help you get the meat out. We were with a group of 4 and it took us 2 1/2 days to get the elk off the mountain down to camp and then out to the truck and to the processor.

I spent a lot of time on my gear list and training, and was extremely happy with all of it. I’ll post up some more if you’re interested. My only let down was not having more time to practice shooting my muzzleloader more.
gatorgrizz27 is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-24-2019, 01:35 PM   #29 (permalink)
Zeus of the Sluice
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Member # 104517
Location: Middle of MT
Posts: 3,041
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trazer75MT View Post
Arizona for sure, check that place out. Montana is shit.
Yup. The big bulls are elusive and in hard to draw areas.

I drive into a field, walk a bit, shoot a cow, drive up and load it. Drop it off to get turned into steak and burger.


You'll have decent chance at a good bull if you go through an outfitter with horses. Colorado and new Mexico seem to have the better genetics if you want a trophy. It's rare to find one over 400" here.
__________________
R.I.P. Jason Payne
chevy_man is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-24-2019, 05:57 PM   #30 (permalink)
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Member # 50525
Location: Tallahassee, FL
Posts: 2,616
Quote:
Originally Posted by chevy_man View Post
Yup. The big bulls are elusive and in hard to draw areas.

I drive into a field, walk a bit, shoot a cow, drive up and load it. Drop it off to get turned into steak and burger.


You'll have decent chance at a good bull if you go through an outfitter with horses. Colorado and new Mexico seem to have the better genetics if you want a trophy. It's rare to find one over 400" here.
Anyone who thinks their first elk is going to be 400” is a fool or hunting a high fenced zoo. There was a podcast last week where Brian Call, Ryan Lampers, Jason Phelps, and Ryan Carter were talking about the biggest bulls they’ve killed. Those guys have probably put close to 100 down collectively, and their biggest were all in the 360’s.

Killing a 400” elk is probably a rarer feat than a 200” whitetail. Guys put in for 20 years for a chance to draw those units. Not to mention you have to be willing to pass up a handful of regular trophies and willing to go home empty handed.

IMO, if you do your homework (including training), a reasonable goal on your first DIY hunt is to get within 300 yards of an elk. It might be in a dead run after it winds you. If you’re going with a reputable guide, I’d expect a single opportunity to take a shot at a legal elk over the course of 7 days. You learn a lot in the first trip.
gatorgrizz27 is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-24-2019, 06:38 PM   #31 (permalink)
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Member # 98578
Location: Texas
Posts: 7,977
Quote:
Originally Posted by gatorgrizz27 View Post
I did my first elk hunt this past year, it was also my first western packpack hunt. We did 7 days in CO in an OTC archery unit, I drew a muzzleloader tag as I’m not super confident with my bow.

We hiked in 5 miles and set up camp, the next day my buddy ended up killing a 5x5 with his bow. I ended up missing a cow on the second to last day of the trip, so I considered it very successful besides my poor shooting.

IMO, you need to decide whether you’re wanting to go with a guide and have a higher chance of killing an elk, or going DIY, whether you want to use a bow, rifle, or muzzleloader, if you want a bull or are ok with a cow, and which part of the season you will want to hunt given weather, the rut, etc. Then look at your available options.

If you’re going by yourself, backpack hunting unguided isn’t really an option unless you can find horse packers to help you get the meat out. We were with a group of 4 and it took us 2 1/2 days to get the elk off the mountain down to camp and then out to the truck and to the processor.

I spent a lot of time on my gear list and training, and was extremely happy with all of it. I’ll post up some more if you’re interested. My only let down was not having more time to practice shooting my muzzleloader more.
Good info here, thanks. If I had to make the decision right now, I would do a DIY hunt. This is probably my naivete showing however I truly don't think I'd be disappointed If I spent a week hoofing it through God's country without even seeing an animal.

I'll be doing this with a good buddy. One of our former COs from the Marine Corps lives in WY and has taken a great elk each of the last few seasons. Right now we plan on defaulting to his instruction as he's already welcomed us out to his place and is happy to come out with us and show us the ropes. The units he hunts have 100% draw rates for non-res as well.

Regardless, I'd love to see your gear list. In the short term, I want to find a pack and boots as that'll get me training. Once we decide if we want to do rifle or bow, I'll start hammering on those as well. Other items on my list are
1) a GOOD rangefinder (leaning towards the vortex ranger 1800)
2) Good binos (leaning vortex diamondback, might spring for Vipers) 10x42
3) Good GPS (have a garmin fortrex, but would like a good handheld)

For a pack, I like the mystery ranch stuff, thinking the metcalf. I like solomon boots, but want to try out a bunch so I'm all ears there.
__________________
Semper Fidelis

Last edited by TJGreg5; 03-24-2019 at 06:44 PM.
TJGreg5 is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-24-2019, 07:17 PM   #32 (permalink)
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Member # 50525
Location: Tallahassee, FL
Posts: 2,616
Quote:
Originally Posted by TJGreg5 View Post
Good info here, thanks. If I had to make the decision right now, I would do a DIY hunt. This is probably my naivete showing however I truly don't think I'd be disappointed If I spent a week hoofing it through God's country without even seeing an animal.

I'll be doing this with a good buddy. One of our former COs from the Marine Corps lives in WY and has taken a great elk each of the last few seasons. Right now we plan on defaulting to his instruction as he's already welcomed us out to his place and is happy to come out with us and show us the ropes. The units he hunts have 100% draw rates for non-res as well.

Regardless, I'd love to see your gear list. In the short term, I want to find a pack and boots as that'll get me training. Once we decide if we want to do rifle or bow, I'll start hammering on those as well. Other items on my list are
1) a GOOD rangefinder (leaning towards the vortex ranger 1800)
2) Good binos (leaning vortex diamondback, might spring for Vipers) 10x42
3) Good GPS (have a garmin fortrex, but would like a good handheld)

For a pack, I like the mystery ranch stuff, thinking the metcalf. I like solomon boots, but want to try out a bunch so I'm all ears there.
Cool. If you have info on where to go, can get an OTC tag, and don’t consider it a waste if you come home empty handed, I’d definitely go DIY. You’ll likely end up getting hooked and wanting to go every year, which isn’t possible $ wise for a lot of guys to do guided.

I’ll find my complete gear list with weights, it’s a bit comprehensive but as I said I really wouldn’t change anything about it. I ran the Sig Kilo 2000 rangefinder and Zeiss Conquest HD 10x42 binoculars. I would absolutely step up to the ~ $1,000 price point in binos, whether they are Zeiss, Meopta, Maven, used Swaro SLC, etc. You can see a long damn way out west and that hunt was the first time that I felt like I got what I paid for, no questions asked. My tag was $500, and my flight was another $500, to not be able to find an animal because I went with cheap glass wasn’t an option for me.

Even if you’re bowhunting, a rangefinder that will read out a ways is really helpful. What tends to happen is that you spot an elk in a draw or below a ridge some distance away, then when you get over there everything looks completely different and you don’t know where they are in relation to you. With a good rangefinder, you can shoot back to your original location if you can see it which is really helpful to tell how close you are to them. I was able to get a reading on elk of 1,997 yards with my Sig.

I went with the KUIU pack system and am really happy with it for my hunting style (light and fast). There are probably some better options for packing meat out though, as it’s not as padded and lacks some of the adjustments of other packs. My buddy was running the Metcalf and also has a Marshall that’s been on two trips he’s talking about selling if you’re interested.

I used Salomon Quest boots and had no complaints with them other than not having a ton of faith that they’ll hold up to multiple trips. I had some chunking of the rand where my foot flexes and some people have had issues with them losing waterproofness quickly. I spent a lot of time setting up my boot system and had absolutely zero blisters, hot spots, or other problems.

I ended up running the Injini Coolmax toe sock liners which made a big difference. Over them I used Darn Tough midweight socks, I had two pairs of each and switched them daily. I used the Lathrop and Sons gel insoles on top of the factory insoles that I ended up cutting down in front of the balls of my feet for more toe room.

I also started treating my feet with Tuf Foot about 2 weeks before the trip and taped up my heels, balls of my feet, and outsides of my little toes with a Leukotape before we left the truck. We averaged 10-15 miles a day and I never had the first issue with my feet. Everyone’s feet are different, but the point is spend some time working on the whole setup. I tried multiple boots in different sizes, different socks, liners, insoles, etc, to find what worked best for me.

I’d skip the handheld GPS personally. I used OnX maps on my phone and a printed out version of the maps on waterproof paper with a compass. The marked trails with mileage, private land boundaries, being able to mark blood sign, etc were all hugely helpful. The bull my buddy shot was very close to private land and I was able to quickly pull out the map as he was bugling and see that as long as he was out of the dark timber we were legal. I did carry a small backup battery pack but the phone lasted 2-3 days per charge in airplane mode running the downloaded maps.

Last edited by gatorgrizz27; 03-24-2019 at 07:21 PM.
gatorgrizz27 is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-24-2019, 09:23 PM   #33 (permalink)
Zeus of the Sluice
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Member # 104517
Location: Middle of MT
Posts: 3,041
Get a better rangefinder. My sig is 10x faster than that vortex, and better at picking up animals.

Get the best binos you can. (I had Diamondbacks, they suck, I learned that lesson the hard way). You'll spend most of your day looking through them. There's a reason you'll see all the guides with Swarovski. The challenge is finding the elk and you'll need to be lucky without good glass. This applies to your rifle scope as well. A good 3-12 or 4-14 is what all my open range hunting rifles wear.

Need good boots, that are already broken in. Insulation depends on you. I have a single pair of 400gram for tree stands, and never use insulated boots for walking. Your needs will vary based on your ability to handle cold.

Same with gear. I like the skre. Merino wool camo under layers, hard shell outers. You'll be using it all off and on all day. Wear it around outside and make sure it's comfy before the trip.

Need a good pack frame if you'll be doing the packing. Entirely dependant on what you like. My Dad still uses an Alice frame. I picked up a Kelty that works fine, but it stays in the truck till I need it.

My day pack is a simple Camelback (also Kelty) with a simple first aid kit, Zippo, TP, 10 rds of ammo (5 in gun, 5 "hunting rounds", 5 "varmint rounds" for coyotes), and some Paracord. Binos and rangefinder go in a chest harness.

Lightweight rifle. The Barrett fieldcraft is a bargain to get into the sub 6 lb rifle. (You can be at 6.5 lbs with the Talley rings and a 12oz scope).
__________________
R.I.P. Jason Payne

Last edited by chevy_man; 03-24-2019 at 09:55 PM.
chevy_man is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-24-2019, 09:28 PM   #34 (permalink)
Zeus of the Sluice
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Member # 104517
Location: Middle of MT
Posts: 3,041
Quote:
Originally Posted by gatorgrizz27 View Post
Anyone who thinks their first elk is going to be 400” is a fool or hunting a high fenced zoo. There was a podcast last week where Brian Call, Ryan Lampers, Jason Phelps, and Ryan Carter were talking about the biggest bulls they’ve killed. Those guys have probably put close to 100 down collectively, and their biggest were all in the 360’s.

Killing a 400” elk is probably a rarer feat than a 200” whitetail. Guys put in for 20 years for a chance to draw those units. Not to mention you have to be willing to pass up a handful of regular trophies and willing to go home empty handed.

IMO, if you do your homework (including training), a reasonable goal on your first DIY hunt is to get within 300 yards of an elk. It might be in a dead run after it winds you. If you’re going with a reputable guide, I’d expect a single opportunity to take a shot at a legal elk over the course of 7 days. You learn a lot in the first trip.

Hunting shows are ruining perception. My Dad drew one of those 20 year tags (took him 22 years). Spent every day off scouting all summer. Was in the last day of season and trying to decide which of the 4 350" bulls was the best when he had a bigger one step in to beat some ass. Measured out 390".

Now that I know how horrible a big rutted up bull tastes, I just go plug a cow for the freezer. I'll take eating them over antlers any day.
__________________
R.I.P. Jason Payne
chevy_man is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-24-2019, 09:30 PM   #35 (permalink)
Pirate4x4 Addict!
 
Weasel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Member # 5639
Location: Rapid City, SD
Posts: 16,570
Lowa boots. Mystery Ranch makes good gear so do Hill People Gear.

The reason all the guides have Swaroski is no one would booked someone that was using Bushnells and you have to look the part.
__________________

Kindness doesn't condemn or condone

Just Add Lightness
Weasel is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-24-2019, 09:37 PM   #36 (permalink)
Pirate4x4 Addict!
 
Weasel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Member # 5639
Location: Rapid City, SD
Posts: 16,570
Quote:
Originally Posted by chevy_man View Post
Hunting shows are ruining perception.
More like people are just obsessed with they need a XYZ score to have a good elk hunt. Just like people saying MT sucks for Elk. Um no they have plenty of elk, you find one shoot it and have a good trip.

Colorado seems to have the best luck in getting a Bull, followed by Montana, and then Wyoming, Idaho, Oregon, Washington, and Utah. So pick one of those, whichever has the best option for tags and have fun.
__________________

Kindness doesn't condemn or condone

Just Add Lightness
Weasel is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-24-2019, 10:35 PM   #37 (permalink)
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Member # 226216
Location: Lewis County, Washington
Posts: 3,198
Washington has elk but also a lot of hunters. You need to get several mules in before it quiets down depending on where you hunt.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
thefishguy77 is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-25-2019, 11:28 AM   #38 (permalink)
Zeus of the Sluice
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Member # 104517
Location: Middle of MT
Posts: 3,041
Quote:
Originally Posted by Weasel View Post
More like people are just obsessed with they need a XYZ score to have a good elk hunt. Just like people saying MT sucks for Elk. Um no they have plenty of elk, you find one shoot it and have a good trip.

Colorado seems to have the best luck in getting a Bull, followed by Montana, and then Wyoming, Idaho, Oregon, Washington, and Utah. So pick one of those, whichever has the best option for tags and have fun.


That's also why you won't find the trophy's in the districts. Everyone shoots the first 2 year old bull they come across. There would be plenty of 350"+ if people could pass up the 250".

Growing up here and seeing the crazy amount of pressure put on by out of state hunters drove me away from chasing wall hangers. I had so many hunts ruined by people blasting on bugles and shitty cow calls because they had no idea what they were doing.
__________________
R.I.P. Jason Payne
chevy_man is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-27-2019, 08:20 AM   #39 (permalink)
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Member # 50525
Location: Tallahassee, FL
Posts: 2,616
Here is my gear list. As I said, it worked out perfectly for the type of hunting we did. Backpacked in 5 miles and set up a spike camp. We could have easily moved in deeper if we weren’t having any luck. Temps were a little warmer than expected, lows were in the mid 30’s and highs mid 70’s. I used everything but my emergency kit but would have been fine down into the mid 20’s.

Clothing worn
- Salomon Quest 4D boots 3 lb 13.4 oz
- Injinji coolmax sock liners 1.3 oz
- Darn tough midweight merino socks 2.3 oz
- KUIU Yukon gaiters 11.9 oz
- KUIU Attack pants 1 lb 1.3 oz
- Smartwool merino boxers 3.8 oz
- Bison designs belt 2.0 oz
- Smartwool 150 merino long sleeve shirt 6.1 oz
- North Face Flash dry 1/4 zip fleece 14.7 oz
- Orvis baseball hat 2.8 oz
- Native sunglasses 1.2 oz
- Orange mesh vest 2.5 oz
- Cascade mountain tech carbon trekking poles 15.2 oz

Clothing packed
- KUIU 145 zip off merino bottoms 6.8 oz
- KUIU Kenai hooded jacket (in stuff sack) 1 lb 0.4 oz
- KUIU Ultra NX rain jacket 7.9 oz
- KUIU Teton rain pants 7.3 oz
- North Face fleece gloves 2.7 oz
- First Lite Tag cuff merino beanie 2.4 oz
- Smartwool 150 merino short sleeve shirt 4.4 oz

Clothing in camp
- Injinji coolmax sock liners 1.3 oz
- Darn tough midweight merino socks 2.3 oz
- Smartwool merino boxers 3.8 oz
- Crocs 13.6 oz

Gear carried
- KUIU Icon Pro 1850 pack (with hip pockets and rifle carrier) 4 lbs 10.6 oz
- KUIU pack rain cover
- KUIU Glassing pad 1.9 oz
- KUIU binoculars harness (with rain cover) 7.6 oz*
- Zeiss Conquest HD 10x42 binoculars 28.8 oz
- Carson lens pen 0.4 oz
- Hunters specialties wind checker 1.4 oz
- Chap stick 0.3 oz
- Monopod with tripod adapter, ball head, Outdoorsmans mount 1 lb 6.6 oz
- Platypus 3L hydration bladder with hose and quick fill fitting 4.0 oz
- Sig Kilo 2000 rangefinder (with case and lanyard) 9.3 oz
- ACR ResQLink+ PLB 5.7 oz
- Black Diamond Storm headlamp 4.2 oz
- Petzl ELite+ headlamp 1.0 oz
- Silva Explorer Pro compass 1.9 oz
- Map
- iPhone 5s (with Life Proof case) 5.1 oz
- CVA Wolf Stainless muzzleloader (with EABCO peep sight) 6 lbs 2.3 oz
- CVA speed loader tube 1.0 oz
- Ammo tubes
- TAG game bags (4 in storage bag) 15.7 oz
- Schrade Mini Pro Hunter knife (with sheath) 4.9 oz
- Paracord loops 1.3 oz
- Nitrile gloves (2 pairs) 1.1 oz
- Mountainsmith Morrison 2 ground cloth 9.6 oz
- SOL survival sleeping bag 3.8 oz
- Single reed call 0.9 oz
- Diaphragm call 0.1 oz
- BIC mini lighter 0.4 oz
- MSR hydration tablets
- MSR groundhog stakes (4)
- Tag
- Zip ties
- Driver’s license
- Hunter’s safety card
- $100 cash
- First aid kit
- Toilet paper
- Wet wipes
- Tenacious tape
- Leukotape
- Fire starters
- Sunscreen
- Barrel patches

Gear in camp
- KUIU XXL dry bag 2.8 oz
- Mountainsmith mountain shelter LT (with stakes & stuff sack) 2 lbs 2.9 oz
- REI Flash sleeping pad 15.7 oz
- Sea to Summit Trek TK II down sleeping bag (with stuff sack) 2 lbs 5.7 oz*
- Platypus 4L Big Zip bladder & hose with Sawyer Squeeze filter 7.5 oz*
- Smart water 1L bottle 1.3 oz
- Extra headlamp batteries
- BRS stove 0.9 oz
- MSR 4 oz fuel canister 8 oz
- BIC mini lighter 0.4 oz
- Toaks 550 mL titanium mug (with storage bag) 3.5 oz
- Sea to summit titanium spork 0.3 oz
- Anker 13,000 mAh battery pack (with cord and storage bag) 9.1 oz
- Dyneema bear bag line 2.0 oz
- Diaphragm call (spare) 0.1 oz
- Hunters specialties wind checker (spare) 1.4 oz
- KUIU small zip top dry bag toiletries kit
- Camp towel
- Body wash
- Toilet paper

Emergency kit
- Mountainsmith Morrison 2 ground cloth 9.6 oz
- Petzl ELite+ headlamp 1.0 oz
- MSR hydration tablets
- BIC mini lighter 0.4 oz
- SOL survival sleeping bag 3.8 oz
- MSR groundhog stakes (4)

Day pack weight: 212.6 oz plus food, water, rifle, bino harness, unweighed item
13 lbs 4.6 oz

Other items weigh 146.6 oz
9 lbs 2.6 oz


Pack weight is 25.4 lbs plus rifle, water, food

14.2 lbs hunting gear, 11.2 lbs camp gear
gatorgrizz27 is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-27-2019, 09:10 AM   #40 (permalink)
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Member # 112738
Posts: 2,156
You haven't mentioned Oregon, but if it is a consideration of yours, I would highly recommend John Cole Outfitters in Grant County. John runs a class act operation and they kill a lot of bulls. Here is my son with a 5 point he killed last year on a John Cole hunt. We are trying to get a spot on one of his management buck hunts for mule deer next year.

zlathim is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-27-2019, 11:26 AM   #41 (permalink)
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Member # 98578
Location: Texas
Posts: 7,977
Quote:
Originally Posted by gatorgrizz27 View Post
Here is my gear list.


Thanks man!
__________________
Semper Fidelis
TJGreg5 is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-27-2019, 10:48 PM   #42 (permalink)
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2018
Member # 841585
Posts: 44
I hunt colorado every year for 3rd season OTC bull tag and draw a deer tag every other year. We hunt public land in the san jaun national forest along the new mexico border. We mainly hunt the higher country unless the animals move out wich is rare for the solo bulls to move during season until the snow is chest deep.

We draw deer tags about every other year. If you leave colorado with a deer tag and you hunted for them you need to rethink how your hunting. Usaully half of our group of about 6 guys gets a bull. We dont glass though. Its all still hunting dark timber. Most of our bulls are shot within 100yds but we have taken some out to 400yds+.

I personally have never bought into the gear fad and do not carry binoculars. But again i dont hunt real open country. Ive never seen the point of wearing camo if you have to wear bright orange as well. Its like the guys who whisper after they shoot a deer with a gun.

I do believe the key to having a good time back there is being in shape and being able to adjust to the altitude. I live around 3500ft visit 5000+ regularly and still struggle every year i go back. I find showing up a couple days early and taking it easy really helps to acclimate.

Packing elk out on your back brings the suck. Best bet is to debone all the meat. One thing you see a lot of on tv is leaving a bull overnight after they shoot. From first hand expierience if you do that doesnt matter if its a 100deg or 0deg it will rot. There a big animal with a lot of heat especially in the rear hams.if you find you have one down in the evening and cant get it out split the pelvis with a saw, dislocate the joints, remove all organs cut all the way from pelvis to jaw and remove wind pipe. Get the elks back up on a fallen log or rock and use sticks to prop it open so it can cool. Your not going to get it in a tree unless you quarter it. 2 times we have had a bear eat on it overnight. But its the crows and magpies that will be on it quick. Just do your best to take care of the meat is what im getting at. Elks ben some of the best ive eaten and some of the worst depending on how it was handled in the field.

Some other advice i have for you is go where the elk are. If your not seeing elk or sign then move. Sometimes its just a ridge or 2 sometimes a mountain over. It seems to many people wait for the elk to come to them when they need to go to the elk. Elk stink. If your in the timber and can smell them your not far behind. Slow down and watch. You can cover 10miles as fast as you want but if you didnt see anything you didnt do something right. There a very noisy animal as well. So your eyes,ears and nose will play a big role in your success. If your dealing with herds of elk,for some reason the bull is usaully the last one in the group. Colorado also has a 4 point or 4 or 5inch brow tine rule a lot of people seem to forget. You can shoot a spike as long as it has a long enough brow tine on one side if your not a trophy hunter. Watched a guy a couple years ago let a 3 point bull go on the last day of his hunt because he didnt know that.

Good luck with the hunt im sure youll have fun nomatter what. Though i hunt different than most would if you have any questions on what units we hunt or something feel free to shoot me a pm
Purpledecember is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-28-2019, 05:46 PM   #43 (permalink)
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Member # 98578
Location: Texas
Posts: 7,977
Quote:
Originally Posted by Purpledecember View Post
I hunt colorado every year for 3rd season OTC bull tag and draw a deer tag every other year. We hunt public land in the san jaun national forest along the new mexico border. We mainly hunt the higher country unless the animals move out wich is rare for the solo bulls to move during season until the snow is chest deep.

We draw deer tags about every other year. If you leave colorado with a deer tag and you hunted for them you need to rethink how your hunting. Usaully half of our group of about 6 guys gets a bull. We dont glass though. Its all still hunting dark timber. Most of our bulls are shot within 100yds but we have taken some out to 400yds+.

I personally have never bought into the gear fad and do not carry binoculars. But again i dont hunt real open country. Ive never seen the point of wearing camo if you have to wear bright orange as well. Its like the guys who whisper after they shoot a deer with a gun.

I do believe the key to having a good time back there is being in shape and being able to adjust to the altitude. I live around 3500ft visit 5000+ regularly and still struggle every year i go back. I find showing up a couple days early and taking it easy really helps to acclimate.

Packing elk out on your back brings the suck. Best bet is to debone all the meat. One thing you see a lot of on tv is leaving a bull overnight after they shoot. From first hand expierience if you do that doesnt matter if its a 100deg or 0deg it will rot. There a big animal with a lot of heat especially in the rear hams.if you find you have one down in the evening and cant get it out split the pelvis with a saw, dislocate the joints, remove all organs cut all the way from pelvis to jaw and remove wind pipe. Get the elks back up on a fallen log or rock and use sticks to prop it open so it can cool. Your not going to get it in a tree unless you quarter it. 2 times we have had a bear eat on it overnight. But its the crows and magpies that will be on it quick. Just do your best to take care of the meat is what im getting at. Elks ben some of the best ive eaten and some of the worst depending on how it was handled in the field.

Some other advice i have for you is go where the elk are. If your not seeing elk or sign then move. Sometimes its just a ridge or 2 sometimes a mountain over. It seems to many people wait for the elk to come to them when they need to go to the elk. Elk stink. If your in the timber and can smell them your not far behind. Slow down and watch. You can cover 10miles as fast as you want but if you didnt see anything you didnt do something right. There a very noisy animal as well. So your eyes,ears and nose will play a big role in your success. If your dealing with herds of elk,for some reason the bull is usaully the last one in the group. Colorado also has a 4 point or 4 or 5inch brow tine rule a lot of people seem to forget. You can shoot a spike as long as it has a long enough brow tine on one side if your not a trophy hunter. Watched a guy a couple years ago let a 3 point bull go on the last day of his hunt because he didnt know that.

Good luck with the hunt im sure youll have fun nomatter what. Though i hunt different than most would if you have any questions on what units we hunt or something feel free to shoot me a pm
I have a contact in Pagosa Springs so we may end up in the general vicinity. This is excellent info and I appreciate the “boots on the ground” realities. Getting in shape is a priority for me. Boots are the first order of business and I plan on buying one of those training masks as well.
__________________
Semper Fidelis
TJGreg5 is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-28-2019, 08:58 PM   #44 (permalink)
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2018
Member # 841585
Posts: 44
Pagosa springs is the same town we stay in smells like rotten eggs but you get used to it. Theres some good oppurtunnity around there if you know where to look. Theres a outfitter based out of mill creek rd there that packs you into some great country. Never hunted with him but we hunt the same country and he had pretty good success rates and was a nice guy. Havnt seen him in his camp last year or 2 during 3rd season but theres ben a outfitter in there the seasons before so ill assume its him. If the deer move out of the high country take a drive down hwy151 one evening. First 5miles of that road has more deer than ive ever seen in one area.

If you know a local thats a pretty good starting point since the deer and elk move through the town when the weather hits. Trying to get a straight answer out of a local is about impossible on wether the animals moved through or not. Couple places to look into are viasaco wich is all oak brush but animals push in there with weather. First notch area is ok but thick. Lake williams is a huge area that i havnt spent a lot of time in but have seen elk in. Theres some side roads off of wolf creek pass that have some rugged no mans land as well. Biggest bull ive ever seen taken was off one of those spur roads. Guy was sitting on a his tailgate with the nastiest most hammered feet ive ever seen. Said it was 7 miles from road to where he shot it and was a hell of a pack out.

The one piece of gear i would recomend is a gps walkie talkie. You really dont need anything fancy just something you can talk to others, and mark way points. 95% of property lines are pretty clear in pagosa but alot of the country looks the same. Getting turned around is a possibility and marking a down animal comes in handy at dark30 and you have to come back the next day.we use the older rhino gps. I dont think youd regret going to pagosa springs. Its a neat town with a lot of country to hunt.

Also Be prepared to see a lot of hunters especially along and near the roads. Do not let it discourage you use thier pressure to your advantage. The deeper you go in the better it gets. They bump alot of animals that you can catch sneaking away from them. The nice thing is there all bright orange so you can pick them out from a distance and divert your course accordingly.
Purpledecember is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-29-2019, 05:19 AM   #45 (permalink)
Granite Guru
 
Aggie06's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Member # 123554
Location: Portland, TX
Posts: 708
Quote:
Originally Posted by Purpledecember View Post
Pagosa springs is the same town we stay in smells like rotten eggs but you get used to it. Theres some good oppurtunnity around there if you know where to look. Theres a outfitter based out of mill creek rd there that packs you into some great country. Never hunted with him but we hunt the same country and he had pretty good success rates and was a nice guy. Havnt seen him in his camp last year or 2 during 3rd season but theres ben a outfitter in there the seasons before so ill assume its him. If the deer move out of the high country take a drive down hwy151 one evening. First 5miles of that road has more deer than ive ever seen in one area.

If you know a local thats a pretty good starting point since the deer and elk move through the town when the weather hits. Trying to get a straight answer out of a local is about impossible on wether the animals moved through or not. Couple places to look into are viasaco wich is all oak brush but animals push in there with weather. First notch area is ok but thick. Lake williams is a huge area that i havnt spent a lot of time in but have seen elk in. Theres some side roads off of wolf creek pass that have some rugged no mans land as well. Biggest bull ive ever seen taken was off one of those spur roads. Guy was sitting on a his tailgate with the nastiest most hammered feet ive ever seen. Said it was 7 miles from road to where he shot it and was a hell of a pack out.

The one piece of gear i would recomend is a gps walkie talkie. You really dont need anything fancy just something you can talk to others, and mark way points. 95% of property lines are pretty clear in pagosa but alot of the country looks the same. Getting turned around is a possibility and marking a down animal comes in handy at dark30 and you have to come back the next day.we use the older rhino gps. I dont think youd regret going to pagosa springs. Its a neat town with a lot of country to hunt.

Also Be prepared to see a lot of hunters especially along and near the roads. Do not let it discourage you use thier pressure to your advantage. The deeper you go in the better it gets. They bump alot of animals that you can catch sneaking away from them. The nice thing is there all bright orange so you can pick them out from a distance and divert your course accordingly.


The one thing that surprised me was the number of hunters who were just along the roads. I was expecting a few, but we saw a bunch glassing off the roads.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Aggie06 is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-29-2019, 09:09 AM   #46 (permalink)
Registered User
 
TheHardWay9's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Member # 208176
Location: Hesperus, CO
Posts: 367
Quote:
Originally Posted by Purpledecember View Post
Pagosa springs is the same town we stay in smells like rotten eggs but you get used to it.
On a side note for anyone wondering...this is because of the minerals from the natural hot springs the town was built around. Fun fact: the world's deepest hot spring is located here. Soaking in the springs leaves you feeling extremely relaxed and rejuvenated. Something to keep in mind, especially after a long backcountry hunt that will take its toll on your body.
I live about an hour away from Pagosa and will treat myself to a soak a handful of times per year. Makes my back pain disappear.
__________________
If you can't fix it with a hammer, you've got an electrical problem
TheHardWay9 is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-29-2019, 12:56 PM   #47 (permalink)
Pirate4x4 Addict!
 
Weasel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Member # 5639
Location: Rapid City, SD
Posts: 16,570
Quote:
Originally Posted by Purpledecember View Post

I personally have never bought into the gear fad and do not carry binoculars. But again i dont hunt real open country. Ive never seen the point of wearing camo if you have to wear bright orange as well. Its like the guys who whisper after they shoot a deer with a gun.
Solid advice here and I'd agree with all of it especially this. I'm a gear nerd but alot of the fancy clothing stuff gets ripped to shreds in heavy timber, etc. And I don't think it makes any difference on the success of the hunt. Not saying to not buy gear if you want but you just don't always need it.
__________________

Kindness doesn't condemn or condone

Just Add Lightness
Weasel is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the Pirate4x4.Com : 4x4 and Off-Road Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

** A VERIFICATION EMAIL IS SENT TO THIS ADDRESS TO COMPLETE REGISTRATION!! **

Email Address:
Insurance
Please select your insurance company (Optional)

Log-in


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Climbing or fall protection rope Travis Waldher General Chit-Chat 52 10-22-2013 03:45 AM
where to hunt in colorado brantb Outdoor Sports and Recreation 2 06-22-2012 08:35 PM
Wildlife wownin Oklahoma 4runner General Chit-Chat 18 03-30-2012 07:09 AM
Colorado Elk hunt Help MEANZ06 General Chit-Chat 20 02-26-2012 08:20 PM
Hunt Exchange leben_sie_gut Outdoor Sports and Recreation 10 02-05-2012 08:30 PM


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 09:34 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0 ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.
User Alert System provided by Advanced User Tagging (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.