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Old 10-02-2014, 12:49 PM   #26 (permalink)
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snow shoes..just incase?
I carry them on all trips that I'll be 10+ miles from a plowed road.
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Old 10-02-2014, 11:37 PM   #27 (permalink)
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Wise man said, always wheel with friends!. Never wheel alone.
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Old 10-07-2014, 07:19 PM   #28 (permalink)
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As stupid as this might sound at first but, carry some road flares. They burn for a decent amount of time, fairly hot, and don't go out in the weather. If you cant find dry enough wood to get a fire going generally speaking a flare with some time will light the "driest" wood you can find. Plus its safer than gasoline, or any other combustible for that matter, and you might end up needing that gas you used to start a fire the night before!

Also It has been mentioned but warm clothes!!! And extra (meaning spare) warm clothes!! You never know when you might be over an undercut from run off or a creek and fall into it. Remember cotton kills, you want poly propylene, wool, or something similar. I have found that snowboard/ski clothes work well for snow wheeling, it's all I wear for the most part.

Lockers have been mentioned here also but to add to that I really like selectable lockers front and rear! Being able to turn them off on the side hills allows you to "power down" to cut a track with one tire and then finesse your way through using the deep track as a "hold". With a locked diff it will almost always dog walk down hill. That being said I have ran ARB front Detroit rear for years, my new rig is getting ARB/ARB. I learned to drive my rig predicting what the rear end would do and was able make it work.

Snow wheeling is by far my favorite kind of wheeling! Like mentioned before the snow can change from day to day, heck through out one day it can change! It keeps you on your toes but can frustrate you also. We've towed 3+ hours to wheel and spend all day to go 500 feet! Set up camp and re-address it tomorrow!

Good luck, stay safe, and have a BLAST!

Picture to get amped for the upcoming season!

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Old 10-22-2014, 03:49 PM   #29 (permalink)
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My turn, snow wheeling is my favorite also that's where you will run into the hardcore guys, anyway I carry a propane torch with a push button igniter, a couple fire starter logs, 18" chain saw, large plastic to put my 1 man 4 season tent on, a 4" thermorest air mattress, -35* bag, and a bottle of JD, When I do spend the night in the snow I sleep like a baby. And only where snow boarding gear and a full face beanie. Californias snow last year sucked hopefully this year will be better.
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Old 10-22-2014, 09:15 PM   #30 (permalink)
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I also like to bring my cawkwarmer....she likes wheelin!
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Old 10-23-2014, 02:27 PM   #31 (permalink)
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Old 10-24-2014, 05:31 PM   #32 (permalink)
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Don't forget an axe. I prefer the all steel Estwing axes. If you're in a big rig with space to haul stuff, a decent size tarp can come in handy. A tarp is nice to cover your rig at night, Keep your rounded up firewood from being lost in the snow, works well as a snow moving chute or drag bag if you need to move a lot of snow a fair distance, and can also work as an emergency shelter.
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Old 10-24-2014, 09:58 PM   #33 (permalink)
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Shovel, hi-lift, straps, air source, Either, or pull a fuel line if needed to reset beads, I always have fire building material, not because I smoke; because I always have fire power , usually always have my hunting pack which has a first aid kit, 10" bowie, skinner, real fire sticks, more fire power, compass, 200' 550 cord, space blanket, hand warmers, led flashlight and headlight.. Otherwise some golden bullets and a little food. I guess I am always so close to civilization I don't worry to much if I forget something.

Will to survive is what keeps you alive, essentials just make it easier.
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Old 10-24-2014, 10:01 PM   #34 (permalink)
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Wise man said, always wheel with friends!. Never wheel alone.
I have a serious problem with this.
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Old 10-24-2014, 10:06 PM   #35 (permalink)
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Lots of good advise here.

65w vhf radio's come in handy when cell phone service is nonexistent, as long as there's someone listening.... CB's are a joke after going to vhf.

I also like to carry a plastic sled for a creeper.... and keeps the kids entertained.
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Old 10-25-2014, 03:42 AM   #36 (permalink)
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Shovel, hi-lift, straps, air source, Either, or pull a fuel line if needed to reset beads, I always have fire building material, not because I smoke; because I always have fire power , usually always have my hunting pack which has a first aid kit, 10" bowie, skinner, real fire sticks, more fire power, compass, 200' 550 cord, space blanket, hand warmers, led flashlight and headlight.. Otherwise some golden bullets and a little food. I guess I am always so close to civilization I don't worry to much if I forget something.

Will to survive is what keeps you alive, essentials just make it easier.
Good items mentioned, also include a ratchet strap to be placed around the tire to assist in re-seating a un-seated tire bead (it will allow the bead to seat easier then w/o).
Unfortunately no amount of Will power will keep you alive when the temp.'s start plummeting below zero. So besides the means to start a fire an Axe should be considered an essential piece of kit if you're venturing into a forested area (because replenishing the fire with more wood will be necessary and often). Placing a warm chainsaw on the ground in temperatures in the -20's will cause the chain to freeze to the blade quickly making the saw useless, requiring the saw to be placed in a fire to unthaw it (cutting through frozen wood is difficult as it dulls the blade very quickly too) an axe will work as long as you can no matter the temperature.

Many layers of clothing is also key, along with the understanding to shed whatever clothing is necessary to keep from sweating when trying to survive in the cold (sweating in sub zero weather is deadly because it can quickly lead to hypothermia and w/o the ability to put heat back into your body death can follow quickly).
Always carry extra (weather appropriate) clothing (and remember cotton kills in the cold) in a dry sack if possible, getting wet w/o the ability to get dry/warm again is deadly in sub zero temp.'s. Three more critical items that may seem obvious are a hat, gloves and matches. Without the ability to keep your hands warm in weather below zero and particularly -20 and colder may cause you to lose the ability for your fingers to function. Meaning tasks as simple as making a fire or zipping up a jacket will not be possible and take note that standard disposable lighters will not even work at -30, where as matches always do (wet matches can be made dry again by simple placing them on your head for a few minutes and presto there dry again). More heat energy is lost via the top of your head then any other part of your body so always wear a hat in cold weather.
Finally water for drinking is critical to functioning in the cold because keeping your body hydrated can be even more important and more difficult then in very warm temperatures, so always bring lots of drinking water and use it.

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Old 10-25-2014, 02:12 PM   #37 (permalink)
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Jesus man that sounds like work, usually it will be above 20* when I snow wheel




Seriously though, good info.
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Old 10-25-2014, 02:45 PM   #38 (permalink)
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Jesus man that sounds like work, usually it will be above 20* when I snow wheel




Seriously though, good info.
-5 is the coldest that I've seen while wheeling in our neck of the woods. -27 is the coldest that I've personally been out in.
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Old 10-25-2014, 03:35 PM   #39 (permalink)
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-5 is the coldest that I've seen while wheeling in our neck of the woods. -27 is the coldest that I've personally been out in.
I've never had a temp Guage of any type up there before. There have been a hand full of times where I am pretty sure it had to be near 0*

Can't say I've ever been in weather colder that that and known it though.
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Old 10-26-2014, 03:00 PM   #40 (permalink)
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I carry ski goggles in case it starts to snow hard. A tarp for working under the car or making a lean to. 3 rolls of para cord and bungies. Five car flares. And my vehicle has an extra starting battery. I also carry a 100 foot extension rope in case my winch line is to short.

I carry about five different types of flashlights with batteries, plus a light that has a magnet on it and runs of 12 VDC for working on rigs at night.

3 VHF base radios for 6 bands and 2 hand helds with extra batteries.
Three compasses and two GPS with extra batteries.
2 mini stoves, on white gas one candle powered.
100 feet of 5/8 poly rope.
Base for my Hi lift.
Bottle jack
All spare hoses and belts
Jumper cables
Ratchet straps
Extra valve stem dealios.
Extra gloves, jacket
large roll of paper towel
1 gallon gas can, empty, siphon hose.
5/16 nut driver for radiator hose pipe clamps.
Headlamp.
...And more I am sure.
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Old 10-29-2014, 07:24 AM   #41 (permalink)
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Hand warmers are great to have, toss them in your sleeping bag when it dips below -10 ish but don't open them unless they're actually needed. and have some to toss in your boots when you wake up in the morning to let them thaw out. If you can fit in your sleeping bag with your boots do it, I'm to tall and always have frozen boots in the morning (hence hand warmers for boots). Sleep with your clothes off and keep your clothes in your sleeping bag with you, when you wake up you'll have something warm to put on until you get the fire going.
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Old 10-29-2014, 01:33 PM   #42 (permalink)
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Sleep with your clothes off and keep your clothes in your sleeping bag with you, when you wake up you'll have something warm to put on until you get the fire going.
Good advice akozman. On my first camping trip in cold weather and I woke up to my socks etc. being frozen solid, it wasn't a fun start to my day. Next night in the bottom of the the sleeping bag they went and no worries. Camping in very cold weather requires very specific equipment/guidelines to follow (like any activity), but once you get the gear and everything figured out it's only slightly more work then warm weather camping. Besides the hard alcohol goes down a little easier in the cold (to keep you warm at night) and the food tastes a little better.

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Old 10-31-2014, 11:57 AM   #43 (permalink)
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Previous posters have pretty much mentioned everything.

I just want to expand on some of the things they've mentioned.

OBA or CO2 tank. I always had 2 valves per wheel, one standard cored valve for checking the pressure and either a drilled out valve with a good metal cap or a 3/8" ball valve with a coupler for the airhose. The ball valve makes life all kinds of easier, no more frozen fingers trying to screw on some tiny cap. I made an airhose with four female couplers and one male coupler. I could connect all four tires at the same time and then couple the hose to the coupler behind the fuelfiller door. I could then get in the Cruiser and wait for my tires to get up to pressure. I always wanted to put a central inflation system in it but never got around to it.

Extra fuel. I started out with 5-15 gallon plastic jugs full of diesel and siphoned that into the maintank. That was no problem since my first two rigs were Toyota Hiluxes with bedcaps, so I never had problems with fuel smell. In my Land Cruiser I had a 27 gallon auxiliary fuel tank and an electric pump wired to a switch on the dash to transfer fuel to the maintank.

I always had insulated overalls in a trashbag in the cargo area or bed to use as work or repair clothes. It could get dirty with oil and grease and even slightly torn and I wouldn't mind, better than destroying my mountaineering gear which cost a lot more than those overalls.

I guess this one depends on the landscape, but I always had avalanche safety equipment with me. It's no fun looking for someone in an avalanche, but it's easier with the right equipment. Works best if 2 people or more have beacons.

I never bothered with foldable shovels, I always brought real aluminium snow shovels and steel gravel shovels with wood handles. They do weigh more (But I wasn't carrying them.) but they move more snow and handle more abuse. Remember to wax your shovels to keep snow from sticking to them. I had my shovels mounted to a roofrack or on the back of the rig.

I also had a 60" steel tipped, aluminum pry bar. That came in handy many times, breaking ice from rigs stuck in rivers, walking stick when wading a fording (Can be used to move rocks on the roverbottom and breaking up ice.). I once saw some guys wrap some wire around a steel pry bar to magnetize it to get a broken axleshaft out of an axlehousing, it was a beautiful thing to watch. They're also ideal tools for guiding snow anchors down into the snow.

Neoprene waders are pretty much necessary if your going to wade a river in the winter time. They're also great for super slushy conditions that make everything else wet.

One thing I and a few other guys I know had/have in our rigs is a length of thin, flexible aluminum ducting that fit our tailpipes, stuffed in a piece of capped PVC pipe to keep it from getting crushed in the pile of equipment. That could be used to thaw airlines, free up winches, heat up fuel filters and fuel lines/hoses, warm up batteries, melt snow and ice out of alternators and beltdrives if the hood got packed overnight or we were recovering a rig after some time or point them at our hands while fixing something. Really nice to have and weighs almost nothing. There are many times a gas torch is just too hot. Really great for drying clothes quickly.

I always had a backpack in the back seat with my basic winter SAR pack out. That way if SHTF I could grab the pack and abandon the rig. When crossing dangerous rivers I would leave it in one of the trucks behind me so I had dry clothes and supplies in case the river wanted to take my truck.

Many here have mentioned winches. A winch is useless if you have nothing to attach the rope to. A small snow anchor is easy to make, takes up little room and weighs very little. I had one made from 1/4" aluminum plate, 1" flatstock drilled to accept shacles and squaretube that my pry bar fit inside, it worked great.

I might add more, too lazy now and there are zombies on my lawn that need killing.


Shit, they're banging on the door!
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Old 11-22-2014, 08:52 PM   #44 (permalink)
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Air down. As much as you can. And have equipment to seat a bead.
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Old 11-22-2014, 09:51 PM   #45 (permalink)
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I have nothing to add other than what everyone else mentioned.
















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Old 11-28-2014, 08:23 PM   #46 (permalink)
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Make sure you have warm gear, extra water, and food. You get stuck over night and you will definitely be glad you have it. I keep about 3 or 4 mre in my truck. The others hit it well with their lists. Oba, lockers, gears, spares of what you might break, extra gas, starting fluid, core tool, tools to work on the truck, winch, a shovel (I recommend just a normal spade shovel or like bca snowmobile shovel which will have a saw in it too). I would skip the chains. You will just dig for the most part.

The driving part is where you will learn a lot. The snow can change from day to day so your technique will too. I like to start people off aired up going up the trail so they can get a feel for whats going on. The I start airing down from street pressure to about 10 psi and run that for a bit. You will notice a big difference on where you will go. Keep going down from there about 2 psi at a time. Without beadlocks I don't like to go below 4 or 5 psi. More likely to blow a bead. The one word I can give you is finesse. If you think a lead foot will get you everywhere your going to have a lot of fun digging. There is a time and place for it but for the most part its finesse. You have to have a good feel for you truck and how it is doing in the snow.

If you have someone that can ride with you who has experience it will definitely jump start you. I hope this gives you some ideas. Its some of the funnest wheeling you can do.
Good advice. I grew up snow wheeling in the Blues. Must be right in your backyard. I live up in Winthrop now. We got about 2 feet the other night. Hope to get more soon.
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Old 11-29-2014, 05:48 PM   #47 (permalink)
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If/when you get out of your rig to check conditions of the trail you're blazing watch your footing and be very conscious of underground creeks, or even light snow melt. Almost broke my neck once when I fell through ~2' of snow and another another 3' into a small underground run-off, and smacked my head as I went down sideways.

This can be even more of an issue spring snow wheeling sometimes you may go hours in, it warms up and on your way out it's a different animal, and next thing you know your rig is falling in 5' slush holes so having a winch or buddy is rather useful


I always go snow wheeling like I'm ready to spend at-least 3 nights, and hike out.

I don't think you can have too many straps, ropes, chains, etc... and multiple recovery methods hi-lift, winch, come-along, binders... you never know when you need to go forward but also lift out of a hole, etc... same is true for snatch-blocks... carry at-least 3, sometimes you have to do some rigging. Same for shovels or digging tools... minimum 2, but I like to take 3. I've broken too many over the years to rely on 1 or 2, and if there are more people the more the faster it gets done.


If you go in something that has a belt be sure you can change it (SnowMobile, ATV, RZR, etc...) broke my belt 100' from the truck luckily, but if there hadn't been 2 other guys (4 of us total) we would have never gotten the ATV back in the track. ATV on tracks don't roll easy, and are VERY heavy.
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Old 11-29-2014, 10:20 PM   #48 (permalink)
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Bring a friend with a dog like yours, too. Lots of good tips here. Bring in cans I've done a fucking lot of snow wheeling. It's fun if you're not stuck
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