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Old 03-29-2017, 03:30 PM   #226 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by maveric View Post
Just got thinking about this. Need to order some sheeting for the under body compartment. I will be building the framework from 1x1x1/8" square tubing. It will be 20 feet long, 8 feet wide, and 2 feet high. Planning on uprights every 4 feet. Will be adding hinged doors on both side.

So my question of the day is:
Do I need to skin this with metal? Or would ABS work? I was thinking about 16ga steel for the skins, and riveting them to the tubing every 8-12". But then got thinking that maybe ABS sheeting would work as well. I am looking at about $60 for a 4x8 sheet of 16ga, or $40 for a 4x8 sheet of 1/16" ABS.

Don't plan on hauling anything really heavy in there, but I want something durable and easy to use. I will use metal on the bottom, but not sure about the sides. I think the aero skirts that are on most trailers now are plastic of some type.
Most of those aero skirts are also wavy (and not by design); how much tolerance you have for that is up to you. ABS will work, but most sheet plastics I've seen will "grow" and get wavy over time with heat cycles, deteriorate with sun exposure, etc. Attaching it in more places will help reduce that. Sheetmetal rusts, dents, but is pretty much impervious to wind, sun, and heat. I'd probably be comparing something more like 20-24ga to plastic for weight, cost, etc., 16ga is massive for what amounts to bodywork.
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Old 03-29-2017, 03:37 PM   #227 (permalink)
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Started on window fillers last night. Using the blades from a vertical vinyl shade to fill the gap between the frame and the window. This will keep the rubber pieces from falling into the gap when they get warm.





This is how the rubber trim will fill the gap.



Will trim them to fit the contour of the window and glue them in place.



Then will do the same with the other piece that will fill the gap along the framing of the wall.

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Old 03-29-2017, 03:40 PM   #228 (permalink)
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FRP sheeting in the bathroom. Still need to get creative with the window/shower surround. Wasn't an issue originally, but after moving to a bigger shower, the window is not where it needs to be.

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Old 03-29-2017, 03:44 PM   #229 (permalink)
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Most of those aero skirts are also wavy (and not by design); how much tolerance you have for that is up to you. ABS will work, but most sheet plastics I've seen will "grow" and get wavy over time with heat cycles, deteriorate with sun exposure, etc. Attaching it in more places will help reduce that. Sheetmetal rusts, dents, but is pretty much impervious to wind, sun, and heat. I'd probably be comparing something more like 20-24ga to plastic for weight, cost, etc., 16ga is massive for what amounts to bodywork.
I had thought about the warping of the plastic. I would paint it, so that would help with the deteriorating. My other concern is that it isn't out of the norm to hit below zero temps around here. I know the steel will hold up, and the ABS gets brittle. A dent might be easier to fix than a hole in the ABS.

That pretty much answers my question. And it isn't like I have to worry about the weight savings between the 2.

Last edited by maveric; 03-29-2017 at 03:45 PM.
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Old 03-30-2017, 09:47 AM   #230 (permalink)
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Just got thinking about this. Need to order some sheeting for the under body compartment. I will be building the framework from 1x1x1/8" square tubing. It will be 20 feet long, 8 feet wide, and 2 feet high. Planning on uprights every 4 feet. Will be adding hinged doors on both side.

So my question of the day is:
Do I need to skin this with metal? Or would ABS work? I was thinking about 16ga steel for the skins, and riveting them to the tubing every 8-12". But then got thinking that maybe ABS sheeting would work as well. I am looking at about $60 for a 4x8 sheet of 16ga, or $40 for a 4x8 sheet of 1/16" ABS.

Don't plan on hauling anything really heavy in there, but I want something durable and easy to use. I will use metal on the bottom, but not sure about the sides. I think the aero skirts that are on most trailers now are plastic of some type.

Any input?
Galvanized sheetmetal would be my choice for under a trailer. Etch it a bit and paint it if you want.
I would probably do 16ga only on the bottom. Get some 18-20ga for the front, back and doors, i assume they will be the same tube frame skinned. you could even do 18ga on the bottom, but it would dent if you loaded it down.
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Old 03-30-2017, 12:56 PM   #231 (permalink)
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Galvanized sheetmetal would be my choice for under a trailer. Etch it a bit and paint it if you want.
I would probably do 16ga only on the bottom. Get some 18-20ga for the front, back and doors, i assume they will be the same tube frame skinned. you could even do 18ga on the bottom, but it would dent if you loaded it down.
Didn't know if the 18-20ga would be heavy enough for the sides. I think I need to go with the heavier ga on the bottom though, since there will be things rolling around in there (camp chairs, bbq, etc)
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Old 03-31-2017, 06:19 AM   #232 (permalink)
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If I'm understanding this right and you're planning to use the bottom sheet as the shelf with a 6x4' open area for it to support the items being stored I would personally go quite a bit thicker steel. Maybe something like a 11ga. I certainly wouldn't trust plastic sheet held on with rivets to act as the shelf. Honestly I'd make a shelf out of 1/2 plywood but that may be overkill.
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Old 03-31-2017, 07:29 AM   #233 (permalink)
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Galvanized sheetmetal would be my choice for under a trailer. Etch it a bit and paint it if you want.
I would probably do 16ga only on the bottom. Get some 18-20ga for the front, back and doors, i assume they will be the same tube frame skinned. you could even do 18ga on the bottom, but it would dent if you loaded it down.
Quote:
Originally Posted by maveric
Didn't know if the 18-20ga would be heavy enough for the sides. I think I need to go with the heavier ga on the bottom though, since there will be things rolling around in there (camp chairs, bbq, etc)
Yeah, go 14-16ga on the bottom.

I think 20ga would be fine on the sides...it's not like you're hauling engine blocks around.

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If I'm understanding this right and you're planning to use the bottom sheet as the shelf with a 6x4' open area for it to support the items being stored I would personally go quite a bit thicker steel. Maybe something like a 11ga. I certainly wouldn't trust plastic sheet held on with rivets to act as the shelf. Honestly I'd make a shelf out of 1/2 plywood but that may be overkill.
Depends on how often he supports it. Some angle iron supports underneath would stiffen the bottom a lot without having to go to thicker material unsupported.
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Old 03-31-2017, 08:27 AM   #234 (permalink)
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I will have upright supports from the bottom of the trailer to the bottom of the compartment every 4 feet. The cross supports on the bottom of the compartment will be about 2-3 feet apart (depending on where they are located). I plan on putting a floor on top of the floor tubing as well (probably 7/16 OSB). The metal is just to keep the road grime off the components and allow me to insulate the water tank area. The water tanks will be attached to a separate frame work inside that compartment, as will the toolbox, propane tanks, and stairs.

I just want to make sure that the sheeting that I install isn't going to be too thin and tear from the wind.

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Old 03-31-2017, 01:45 PM   #235 (permalink)
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Ah ok, that makes sense. I did 0.045" Aluminum under my sleeper, supported on a roughly 2' square grid with rivets every 6 inches and 3M Panel Bond adhesive to help seal it all up from weather. It's plenty, and I think would be fine for what you're doing. (BTW The 2' square grid was to support the actual sleeper/floor, not just for the lower sheeting.)

I'll be doing 16ga 316 Stainless for all of our doors. It's heavier than we need but I hate flimsy feeling doors and I don't have the tooling to do a cross brake.
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Old 04-01-2017, 08:22 AM   #236 (permalink)
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Panel adhesive/seal sealer is a really good idea. Not only gives some rigidity and minimize flex between screws/rivets/stitch welds, keeps the inside drier, and importantly, keeps the grime out of the seams which is where rust is most likely to start.

I'm going to build a new coach battery box for my MH and will use 1.5x1/8 angle for the frame and some 20ga galv scrap for panels--with seam sealer.
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Old 04-04-2017, 03:05 PM   #237 (permalink)
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Cut out the venting for the fridge. The original camper had the upper vent on the roof, but since I am at the max 13-6 height, I had to install both on the side. I hope it works. Looks like most newer campers have them set up this way now.





Finally at a place to install the side entry door. It is temporarily installed, as I need to design and install a framework around it that will support the wall/floor/door.








Last edited by maveric; 04-04-2017 at 03:05 PM.
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Old 04-04-2017, 03:10 PM   #238 (permalink)
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Installed the final window in the garage. Adds a lot of light inside.





Finally getting to the under box. Trying to figure out how to install the used tanks is a challenge. The tanks aren't the issue, just the vent configuration and the location in reference to the new plumbing.



I originally tried to place everything side by side, but the compartment would have to be about 13 feet long. I would rather cramp things up a bit and gain some storage instead.

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Old 04-04-2017, 03:22 PM   #239 (permalink)
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Very nice!


Keep up the good work .
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Old 04-05-2017, 07:20 AM   #240 (permalink)
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Got the lower framework built and installed.





Will be using angle bolted to the lower rail of the trailer for mounting. 44 holes per section. 176 total, took a while with a hand drill.



Will be using a foam between the steel angle and the alum frame. Then will use seam sealer to seal them together.

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Old 04-05-2017, 07:22 AM   #241 (permalink)
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After hanging the framework, decided on a different layout for the tanks. Mostly based on available space. I am considering using the water tank toward the rear of the trailer as a back-up tank. Will fill both, but will use the main tank until it is empty, then open the valve from the back-up to refill main tank. The main tank will have level sensors on it.




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Old 04-05-2017, 07:30 AM   #242 (permalink)
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It looks like you're in a pretty dry environment, but I'd still suggest using stainless bolts there. Far weaker than the usual hardware but I'd not want galvanic action to be eating the hardware holding that up if it sees salt spray exposure. Dissimilar metals get nasty. The foam tape will help with the aluminum corrosion and jacking but the fasteners will still see the nastiness.
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Old 04-05-2017, 10:47 AM   #243 (permalink)
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Decided that I am going to install the Onan on the truck. This decision was based on use and size. Since I will ALWAYS have the truck when I use the camper, but may not always have the camper when I use the truck, it seems better placed on the truck.



The Onan didn't have a fuel tank or a control panel, so I picked up a junk genset from my brother. Going to use the fuel tank and panel from it.





The tank holds 6.5 gallons, so should run for quite a while.



However, I am not an electrician, so need to do some research to figure out how to wire it into the panel. It is capable of 220v. There are 4 wires from the genset, Red, Black, White, Green.



And 5 on the panel, Red, Brown, Blue, White, Green/Yellow



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Old 04-05-2017, 10:50 AM   #244 (permalink)
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It looks like you're in a pretty dry environment, but I'd still suggest using stainless bolts there. Far weaker than the usual hardware but I'd not want galvanic action to be eating the hardware holding that up if it sees salt spray exposure. Dissimilar metals get nasty. The foam tape will help with the aluminum corrosion and jacking but the fasteners will still see the nastiness.
Was just going to use standard grade 5 hex bolts, but I think I will pick up some stainless hardware instead. Don't plan on using this a lot during the winter, but the shit the state puts on the roads around here is pretty nasty.
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Old 04-05-2017, 11:05 AM   #245 (permalink)
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Picked up the batteries for the bank, which will be mounted behind the water tanks (curb side). Went with 6 volt golf cart batteries, as I have had numerous people recommend them.



Helps having Interstate Batteries as a sponsor too



Since I have the walk in door mostly installed, need to make stairs to get in.
Haven't 100% decided on this yet, but built some stairs from some lightweight channel and some old steps from a retired fire truck.



I am thinking about building a landing for the stairs that slides under the trailer, and then these stairs hang off of. If I just needed inside for a minute, I could just pull the stairs out and hang them at the door. But if I was on site for a while, I would pull the landing out.
Just haven't figured out how to make the slides, and make them heavy duty enough to hold a person's weight while extended.

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Old 04-05-2017, 11:28 AM   #246 (permalink)
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The panel picture makes it a little hard to decode, but the genset is white=neutral; green= ground; red and black are your hot legs, both get used on the 220v plug and one (usually black) gets used on the 110v plugs.
for the 110v plugs you have black on one side and white on the other, white is neutral and goes on the oversize or sideways pin side. (the one that looks like a "T" on your plug)
here is the diagram for the 220v plug on the panel.
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Old 04-05-2017, 12:23 PM   #247 (permalink)
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The panel picture makes it a little hard to decode, but the genset is white=neutral; green= ground; red and black are your hot legs, both get used on the 220v plug and one (usually black) gets used on the 110v plugs.
for the 110v plugs you have black on one side and white on the other, white is neutral and goes on the oversize or sideways pin side. (the one that looks like a "T" on your plug)
here is the diagram for the 220v plug on the panel.
That is correct for the generator end, but not for the panel end.
Looking at this picture:

Blue and Brown look like they are neutral
White and Red look like they are hot
Green/Yellow is ground.
Can you remove the shrink tube from the wires to get a picture (and take one from the top and bottom of the panel)? That would make it easier to see what wire does what.
The T shaped slot in the 120V outlets is the neutral, the other one is hot and the round pin is obviously the ground.
Also, a wiring diagram for a similar generator (the MP7500E): http://www.homedepot.com/catalog/pdf...5597df6da7.pdf

Aaron Z

Last edited by aczlan; 04-05-2017 at 12:32 PM.
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Old 04-05-2017, 01:15 PM   #248 (permalink)
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Blue and Brown look like they are neutral
White and Red look like they are hot
Green/Yellow is ground.
I agree. Looks the same to me.

It appears that Blue and Brown might actually be Blue/Brown? The one photo looks like a blue sheath with a brown stripe...much like your Yellow/Green ground.

Take all that extra shit off and rewire it...or use marker paint pens and color the wires they're supposed to be.

Red can stay Red
Yellow/green should go all green.
White should become Black
Blue/Brown need to go white.

One red 110V hot hits one circuit breaker and one 110V receptacle..and one leg on the 220V receptacle.
The other (black) 110V hot hits one circuit breaker, the other 110V receptacle, and the remaining leg on the 220V twist-lok.


Good call on the 6V batteries. They have thicker plates than 12V...which require twice as many plates in the same space.
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Old 04-05-2017, 01:31 PM   #249 (permalink)
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That onan is a gasoline unit? Shame. Would be MUCH nicer to tie into the truck tank instead of having another damn thing to fill.
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Old 04-05-2017, 04:15 PM   #250 (permalink)
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The panel picture makes it a little hard to decode, but the genset is white=neutral; green= ground; red and black are your hot legs, both get used on the 220v plug and one (usually black) gets used on the 110v plugs.
for the 110v plugs you have black on one side and white on the other, white is neutral and goes on the oversize or sideways pin side. (the one that looks like a "T" on your plug)
here is the diagram for the 220v plug on the panel.
Thanks

Quote:
Originally Posted by aczlan View Post
That is correct for the generator end, but not for the panel end.
Looking at this picture:

Blue and Brown look like they are neutral
White and Red look like they are hot
Green/Yellow is ground.
Can you remove the shrink tube from the wires to get a picture (and take one from the top and bottom of the panel)? That would make it easier to see what wire does what.
The T shaped slot in the 120V outlets is the neutral, the other one is hot and the round pin is obviously the ground.
Also, a wiring diagram for a similar generator (the MP7500E): http://www.homedepot.com/catalog/pdf...5597df6da7.pdf

Aaron Z
I will do that tonight and post up tomorrow.

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Red can stay Red
Yellow/green should go all green.
White should become Black
Blue/Brown need to go white.

One red 110V hot hits one circuit breaker and one 110V receptacle..and one leg on the 220V receptacle.
The other (black) 110V hot hits one circuit breaker, the other 110V receptacle, and the remaining leg on the 220V twist-lok.
Thanks. That is the kind of instruction I need sometimes.

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That onan is a gasoline unit? Shame. Would be MUCH nicer to tie into the truck tank instead of having another damn thing to fill.
Yes, gas engine. I would prefer diesel so I could tie into the truck tank, but the price was right for this one. I think I will be installing the tank into the top of the bed, directly above the genset. I have the original framework from the donor generator, so I will use it as a cage around the tank. It will also give me something to mount a cover to so it doesn't fill up with snow/water.
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