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Old 03-15-2009, 02:29 AM   #1 (permalink)
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Caliper Rebuild Tech - not dial up friendly

Hey all, I'm not sure how needed this is or not since most people just seem to go for the reman calipers anyway but I decided to save the money and rebuild my old ones cause I had the time and could use the money elsewhere... anyway I looked for something like this and couldn't find it so I figured I'd write one myself to hopefully help the next guy looking... and maybe it might find its way into the FAQ if its deemed worthy enough..

Here we go, how to rebuild your toyota calipers:

I was doing this on the solid axle ones but I wouldn't think the ifs process is much different...

Tools/Parts needed:
17mm wrench
14mm wrench
10mm wrench
wire wheel on a bench grinder
compressed air
brake fluid
4 replacement O-rings (I used 8mm ID x 12mm OD x 2mm W)
2 rebuild kits (Autozone part number 66576)
locktight
parts cleaner
high temp paint

Step 1: Remove the calipers from the car.


There are 2 17mm bolts and the 10mm brake line holding them on and once those are removed the caliper should come right off but it might need some love with a rubber mallet.


Once its off (or any part) I like to put the bolts back in the holes so I don't lose them.


Step 2: Once its on the bench, remove the old pads.


I used a screwdriver to pull the safety pin out, just watch out it doesn't spring across the shop and get lost.


Then I just used a small punch and a hammer to tap the holding pins out and the pull the pads out.


Step 3: Remove the old dust covers.

I put it in a vise first to make it easier to work on.


Then I popped off the snap rings with a screwdriver and just pulled the old dust covers off.


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Old 03-15-2009, 02:31 AM   #2 (permalink)
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good idea, but some of your picts are hosed...
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Old 03-15-2009, 02:33 AM   #3 (permalink)
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Step 4: Separate the caliper.
Remove the 4 bolts holding the halves together using a 14mm wrench. Leave the bleeding valve in at this point as it will make removing the pistons easier.. and if you took it out already, put it back.


You can notice I got lucky and most of the piston was pushed in and protected so I shouldn't see much pitting... If the pistons are badly pitted just stop here, and trade them in for cores...



Also take note of the small o-rings between the halves, these are not included in the rebuild kit and they were missing from one of my calipers..


First I unstuck them by pushing them in as far as they would go with a c-clamp.


Then, using a wire wheel (wear your glasses and gloves please), I cleaned off the surface of the pistons as best I could, basically trying to clean out the groove as good as I could. Then spray some wd-40 or pb blaster or whatever in the space between the piston and the cylinder.



Step 5: Remove the pistons.

After that you want to put a clamp on the larger piston to hold it in. Then cover one hole with your finger or another clamp (I did it one way on one and the other way on the other) and blast some air into the open hole and the small piston should come flying out. Its a good idea to put a rag over the caliper so you don't sent the piston across the shop. The reason I said do the small one first is because the clamp I used wasn't big enough to cover the large pistons hole. After the small piston is out, relocate the clamp (with large rubber ends) to cover the hole from the small piston and repeat the air process for the large piston. And then the entire process for the other side of the caliper.


Here you can see both the pistons out.


Here is just a picture of 2 freshly removed pistons next to 2 already cleaned ones...
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Old 03-15-2009, 02:35 AM   #4 (permalink)
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Step 6: Clean the pistons.

I just soaked them in this for a while and then carefully wire brushed the edge, you don't want to wire brush the sides cause you want them to stay as smooth as possible so they continue to seal well.


Step 7: Remove the inner seals.


I just carefully wedged a small screwdriver under them and pulled them out, but be careful not to slip and scratch the cylinder wall for the same reason as above..


Now you have the 2 halves ready to clean.


Step 8: Now remove the bleeding valve using a 10mm wrench (or a channel lock.. whatever works)


Step 9: Clean the main parts.

I used 2 different wire wheels, parts cleaner, a scraper, small screw driver, etc. A small brush on a dremel tool would of been great but I didn't have one at the time and didn't feel the need to bother with it.
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Old 03-15-2009, 02:36 AM   #5 (permalink)
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Step 10: Protecting the cleaned parts.


I chose the dupli-color break caliper brush on paint kit, any high heat spray or brush on paint should work though. Follow the instructions for whatever you use.


Here's after one coat..


and now two..


between coats you can also clean up the hardware that you put in a safe place before so you wouldn't lose it...

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Old 03-15-2009, 02:37 AM   #6 (permalink)
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Step 11: New seals and dust covers.

Here is a comparison of the old seals vs. the new... and the bag.


After the paint is dry you can go ahead and start putting in the new seals and such, I got my kits at autozone for 10 bucks each. but you can get them where ever.


Carefully put the seals into the grooves they belong in.



Then insert the pistons, I used some break fluid for lube and to coat the surfaces but I still needed some love with the rubber mallet to get them all the way in.


Next you can put on the dust covers, just push them over the pistons and install the snap rings. The large ones just popped on but i had some trouble with the smaller ones so I just put them on the end of a screwdriver and put them where they needed to go and just pulled the screwdriver out and that seemed to work well.




Notice how I got some paint on the mating surfaces of the 2 main parts... you want to carefully wire brush that off so the surfaces mate as well as possible.
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Old 03-15-2009, 02:37 AM   #7 (permalink)
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Step 12: Reassembly.

Before you put the halves back together you have to replace those little o-rings.. since the kit didn't include new ones I found a generic 172 piece set that had some that would work.



Here's a comparison of the generic (left) to the stock (right) o-rings.


Put them in the side with the recession and then carefully place the 2 halves back together.



Be sure to put some locktight on the threads and tighten them back up. I chose to put it back in the vise for this part.


Then reinstall the cleaned up hardware (don't forget the bleeding valve), step back and enjoy!



This is as far as I got cause I'm not ready to put them back in the car yet (samurai project) but you would need to put in new pads and then to just reverse step 1, I would probably put some locktight on the 17mm bolts that hold it on to the kuckle too, make sure to properly bleed them, and you will be on your way to stop again!

Please note: was my first tech write-up so hopefully it wasn't too bad, I'm sure there are probably 15 different ways to do this but I think I covered everything important, let me know if I'm missing anything, Thanks for reading and I hope this helps someone.
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Old 03-15-2009, 02:39 AM   #8 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ocdropzone View Post
good idea, but some of your picts are hosed...
your too fast! the pictures are still loading to photobucket!
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Old 03-15-2009, 04:46 AM   #9 (permalink)
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Nice job, except for one thing.
I saw that you are using an open end wrench on the brake line and bleeder, this has the potential to be a disaster if you round the flare nut on the brake line. You should be using a flare nut wrench. http://www.mytoolstore.com/sk/sk03150.html

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Old 03-15-2009, 08:19 AM   #10 (permalink)
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Very good write-up, well done.

I've thought about tackling this job in the past but always pussed out
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Old 03-15-2009, 11:12 AM   #11 (permalink)
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Nice job, except for one thing.
I saw that you are using an open end wrench on the brake line and bleeder, this has the potential to be a disaster if you round the flare nut on the brake line. You should be using a flare nut wrench. http://www.mytoolstore.com/sk/sk03150.html
Thanks, I actually broke that wrench I was using before it loosened up, I don't have one of those wrenches and just ended up using channel locks... BUT that wrench IS the right way to do it.
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Old 03-15-2009, 11:42 AM   #12 (permalink)
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Nice write up, & I like that you noted the eye and hand protection, might as well as a public service also mention lung protection, as just something to be aware of. Operations like grinding, sanding, wire wheel brushing on these type of items can produce/aerosolize asbestos contaminated dust (coming off the brake pads and/or brake shoes/clutch lineings). Look for ways if possible to minimize creating this type dust and then breathing it right into your lungs. (especially while )
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Old 03-25-2009, 08:01 AM   #13 (permalink)
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Thank you! great write up! I'm just about to do this rebuild on my toy'ed zuk..
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Old 03-25-2009, 08:19 AM   #14 (permalink)
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just out of curiosity, how long did it take you to rebuild the caliper?

I know rebuilt ones from the parts store aren't that expensive (its been a while since I bought a pair so I am not 100% on that). Maybe its just the 3 years of me working on my junk that makes me want to take the easy way out.
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Old 03-25-2009, 09:22 AM   #15 (permalink)
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One thing you might to note is that once you pop out one piston, you'll need to block off the bypass so you're not just blowing air out of the mating surface... or vice versa. I used the same rebuild kit, and the seals and snap rings were kind of a pain in the ass if they got even the LEAST bit moist. The rings wanted to slide up and off the seal. Or, the seal would slide up forcing the ring off. Just takes a little while and some patience, but definitely a fun little project.
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Old 03-25-2009, 09:32 AM   #16 (permalink)
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just out of curiosity, how long did it take you to rebuild the caliper?

I know rebuilt ones from the parts store aren't that expensive (its been a while since I bought a pair so I am not 100% on that). Maybe its just the 3 years of me working on my junk that makes me want to take the easy way out.
Breaking them down takes probably 10 minutes. Cleaning them for paint... that's a different story. You could rebuild one w/in an hour if you're not repainting. I used a rattle can caliper paint and shit man that took forever to dry. Literally, overnight to dry. I forget the brand, but it was just some offbrand that Advance Auto had.
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Old 03-25-2009, 09:47 AM   #17 (permalink)
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good write-up.

i'll probably be doing that on my IFS calipers, before i swap them into my 4runner. its the same process.
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Old 03-25-2009, 10:11 AM   #18 (permalink)
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This is worthy of going in the Faq, nice write up.
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Old 11-22-2009, 07:09 PM   #19 (permalink)
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UPDATE FOR EVERYONE WHO WANTS TO DO THIS. NO ONE CARRIES ANY REBUILDING KITS (Kelowna area)


Nice write up and a lot of pics and detail.
Awesome job. Helps me lots

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Old 11-22-2009, 09:07 PM   #20 (permalink)
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Wow some Tech


Nicely done


FWIW I found that the spray on caliper paint dry's pretty fast normally.
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Old 11-22-2009, 10:08 PM   #21 (permalink)
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After going to all that trouble you should have powder coated your calipers as pc is brake fluid resistant...those paint kits are not unfortunately and won't last.

Nice work.

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Old 02-04-2010, 05:04 PM   #22 (permalink)
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I

Just rebuilt a set of V6 IFS calipers and the only difference was, I couldn't get the pistons to come out with air, so I used a set of vice grips (gently) on the lip on the piston.

The V6 ones have a lip which is not part of the cylinder that provides the seal, so there's no big deal if there's a few blemishes. I was able to get them out with a little umph and little to no scratches.
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Old 02-04-2010, 05:15 PM   #23 (permalink)
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what is dial up?

in my experience i have used a caliper rebuild grease. it very similar to gel, but designed for brake fluid. the only place i have ever been able to find it is at Car Quest.

seems to me i would have rather put forth the effort on V6 calipers, but obviously those are not always availible to everyone.

and as a tip, incase someone didnt know, brake fluid is water soluble
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Old 03-21-2010, 12:43 PM   #24 (permalink)
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Powder coating?

Hey guys-

My calipers are torn down, blasted, and ready to go to the powder coater. Does anyone know which type of powder coat is resistant to brake fluid?

Googling results in some folks saying powder coat is or isn't resistant to brake fluid, which I'm hoping is attributable to the different kinds of powder coat. Anyone know?

I'm also open to painting if there's a brake fluid and heat resistant paint. I would have guessed caliper paint is... but?


Thanks
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Old 03-22-2010, 12:12 PM   #25 (permalink)
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X2 you using vise grips on the list. I couldn't pop mine out safely with using air, so I used vice grips. Came out with no problem at all.

Also, to clean the pistions, Invest in a brass wire wheel (a small one for a dremel or die grinder). Since the brass is soft, you can put it right on the finish of the piston, and it will not scratch it. However, it buzzes right thorough rust.
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