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Discussion Starter #141 (Edited)
I used the old bearing and a big socket to tap on the new bearing on the output shaft (old bearing was removed with a hammer and brass drift).


Set the gears inside the housing and slid the shaft in through the gears.


Here is the intermediate gear set with Novak's special shaft and bearings. (supposedly much higher quality than the other aftermarket shafts). The main feature is the high quality material and proper heat treat. The other 'bonus' is the o-ring grooves. This is a dubious bonus--I found these unworkable. More on this later.


Installation is easy, just set the intermediate gear in there, put on the o-rings, carefully line up the thrust bushings... careful... careful....tap it in place... then flip it back over and.... oh for fawks sake!


My total :homer: happened for good reason. After pressing the shaft back out I found out that the o-rings were completely mangled and cut to pieces. Several large strands were wrapped around the rollers in the bearings. The problem: sharp edges! The way the case is shaped I don't know if you could ever get all of the sharp edges knocked down in such a way that you can install this shaft without ripping the o-rings to shreds. I tried a few times, gave up and went with ultra black RTV splooge.


Okay, back on track.
 

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Discussion Starter #142 (Edited)
Next, tap on the bearing on the other side of the output shaft.


Then put together the front output housing and assemble the front shift fork. I wired this one in place too.


And here is the assembly at this point:


A quick note about the gear cover: The one I used came off of a D18 from a M38A1 (military early CJ-5). It might be thicker (not sure) but it has a double layer gasket flange which seemed like a good thing. It's not a major upgrade, but since I had one I used it.

A few more notes.

I wanted the option for 2-low to allow for more maneuverability while the hubs are locked. I have heard a few rumors about removing the interlock pill, grinding the rails, and how some things can lead to the transfercase popping out of gear or out of 4wd. I decided to investigate this a little closer. Here's what I found:

The rail on the top side is the hi-N-low rail, the lower rail is the '4wd' rail, or really, the front drive engagement/disengagement rail.

2wd - High Range


2wd - Neutral


4wd - High Range


4wd - Neutral (the pill rolled a bit to the right, it should be lined up with the notch on the lower 4wd rail)


4wd - Low


What I learned from the above:

There is no way to engage front wheel drive only (such as in a modified atlas, D300, D20, NP205 etc).
Grinding the rails (either lengthening the notch on the 4wd or low range rail) would allow for 2-low. But this would be no different than removing the pill (which is reversible if you don't like it).
The interlock pill only prevents 2-low. This would be useful in preventing the transfercase from popping out of 4wd and into 2wd in low range only.

I chose to remove the pill and have not had any problems with it. YMMV.
 

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Discussion Starter #143 (Edited)
Front output assembly ready to go on. FWIW I used the same permatex 300 red goo that I used on my engine rebuild. I think this build has taught me a thing or two about building things without the RTV splooging out where you don't want it.


Next up is setting the proper endplay on the output shaft. This is a fairly critical step. For those converting their output shaft retainer to something else (for example, adding a parking brake) you should probably check this out and not just assume it will be fine. I did not have a dial indicator, so I made due with a caliper.


What I did, is I first pushed the output in all the way, tight. Then put on the calipers and zeroed them. Next I grabbed a pry-bar, rested it on the socket (as shown) and pried out to move the shaft out as far as it would go. The distance traveled is the end play measurement.

So I had a way to measure it and I had two t-cases worth of shims to choose from, but I had the WORST time trying to get the right number! I first assembled and had say .030" play. So I removed a .010 shim... reassembled, which gave me .000" (no) endplay. What?? I played this game for literally DAYS. (or in my case nights).

No matter what combination I chose, the end result never, ever, ever, ever, ever worked out. Okay, call me a Toyota guy, but this is yet one more jeep thing that I just don't understand.... :shaking:

I decided my problem must have to do with dirt. The shims I had all been liberally bathed in solvent, but they all had a bit of surface rust. So I decided to hit them all with the palm sander for a few seconds


I found that I was able to take these down quite a bit, turning unusable .030" shims into very useful .020 or .015 shims... eventually after probably three or four more attempts I got a number that was within spec, actually right about in the middle of the spec. (.004-.008).

In writing this, I read what Novak had to say (in the above posted link) and would recommend doing the same before starting your own D18 rebuild. They had a few tricks for this process that probably would have sped things up some. Also, they suggest using a spray shellac on all of the shims--which I would second! Since I ended up with about 5 or 6 shims, I have a whole bunch of leak paths...
 

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Discussion Starter #144 (Edited)
Last picture of the insides before I button it up...


And a final coat of POR-engine paint over the complete assembly and parking brake.
 

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Discussion Starter #145 (Edited)
Parking Brake:

I actually was able to reuse all of the parts on this, no new parts needed.... amazing what a little elbow grease (and a lot of solvent and brake cleaner and paint) can do ;)

1st step was to put on the backing plate and try my hand at safety wiring. (yes there is a technique for this, but after a few hours on google, I still don't know exactly what it is....)


That was a mess. After repeating that about 10 times (the one shown was the best of 10) I finally gave up and decided I would just do something that would work. Even if it wasn't really the right way.


Lever installed


Done.


Not shown, but I installed the drum and adjusted the brakes as tight as I could where there was zero drag on the drum. This parking brake works GREAT!

(Just don't expect it to work if you need to change a tire. You'll push on the wrench and just drive the jeep right off the jack with the opposite tire. Done that a few times now :homer:. Open differential... :shaking:)
 

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Discussion Starter #148
The 4.86 kit would be really nice! Combined with a low geared T90 you'd have a super light and low profile (sleeper) drivetrain too.

Seems like I recall you posting up some exhaust questions a bit ago for a V6/4spd conversion... assuming I'm remembering right, when you went to the V6/420 did you keep the obrien case or go with a stock one + OD? I'm thinking w/ the 420 you'd have a good trail gear in high range and a crazy low 34:1 low-low gear (183:1 overall) when you really needed it. :smokin:

I don't suppose you know if they ever attempted to make a OD drive gear for the 4.86 gear set? I wonder if there is even room?
 

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Discussion Starter #150 (Edited)
A little more touch up paint and the t-case is done.





A few other things I left out of the above rebuild:

-I removed the breather cap thing and replaced it with a 90 degree elbow and barbed fitting

-I am having some trouble with the front and rear outputs leaking. The yokes both looked pretty good (not perfect, there was a ridge where the lip seal rides, but it was very smooth and not real deep). Anyway between the yokes and (I think) the shims leaking it always leave a little 1-2" 90W puddle on the floor every time you park it.

I'm thinking next time I have this out I may try either adding a redi-sleeve to the yokes (keep in mind, the redisleeves cost almost as much as a new yoke) and/or I may try a different lip seal. Places like SKF/CR make quite a variety of lip seals, I just need to see what they have in this size.
 

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Discussion Starter #151 (Edited)
assembly time

With the drivetrain done, time to get everything put together and installed.



Resurfaced flywheel with new ring gear installed



The new pilot bushing gave me a lot of trouble :(. I bought two, from two different sources. Before install they were fine, but after install the ID had shrunk just a little too much to fit on the input shaft. I made this little socket-duct tape-emery cloth flap wheel thing and carefully sanded the ID until I was able to get the input shaft to fit.



Found out my old input shaft made for one heck of a nice clutch alignment tool :smokin:



New clutch from Herm. I miss my old clutch, it was so light! This new one is a little stiffer than what I have in my 1/2 ton pickup, but it's not bad and engages very nicely.
 

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Discussion Starter #152 (Edited)
Here it is all bolted together and ready to go in the chassis



Engine is in but......



The master cylinder, brake lines, and bellhousing are NOT happy. Neither am I. :(

 

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Discussion Starter #153 (Edited)
So for the 150th time, I have yet another brake MC interference problem. Yay.

This is why I regret not just bending the pedal arm over. Not much space here.



I first tried a set of 90 degree banjo fittings (from Herm). Well, they didn't fit either. The fitting itself was as wide as the gap, there was no way to get the bolt in.

Next I tried adapting some large diameter tubing (probably 3/8") running from the large diameter hole on the brake MC down, to an adapter and into the normal 3/16" diam tubing.

This didn't fit either.

So finally, by pure dumb luck I found out that you can get oversized fittings for 3/16" brake line!! I guess in some cars (probably most all jeeps) they use the oversized fitting on drum brake applications to keep you from mixing things up. Well, with one of these fittings plumbed onto a 3/16" line everything finally fits!!



Yet another reason I hate my local parts stores. It would have been so nice if they would have mentioned this fitting during the 20 some odd times I was there scrounging for some way to connect the big flare MC to the 3/16" brake line.
 

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Discussion Starter #154 (Edited)
OD:

One of my friends sold me an OD off of his M38A1 project remains... I had Herm go through it was all new syncros, bearings and other small parts that he deemed necessary. Since he only charges around 20 or 30 for labor--I decided to go that route vs doing it myself.



The gear assembly on the left hand side is the part that you have to change to work with the various gear tooth count combinations out there (or the low gear kits).

It's a planetary gear set where the output shaft of the transmission drives the planet carrier, and the ring gear/bull gear (the visible gear on the left) drives the gears in the t-case. In 1:1 the planet carrier is engaged to the ring gear assembly and the sun gear (shown on the right) is free to spin along for the ride. In overdrive the sun gear is locked to the case, forcing the planet gears to spin around the sun gear, in turn spinning the ring gear (and the visible bull gear) faster, giving you a .75:1 overdrive.

First, install the planetary gearset/bull gear into the t-case and tighten down the nut with a socket extension (it's square drive, can't remember 3/8 or 1/2").



Next you have to wiggle a keeper and a special 4 lobed snap ring into place deep down inside this thing. This is such a pain in the ass you may choose at this point to remove the OD and put it up on Ebay instead of installing it. But it is worth it.



After that, install the oil pickup rail and plop the rest of the OD into the back of the t-case. This came out of a jeep with a T90 so the shift lever and bracket fit and bolted up to my T90.

 

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Discussion Starter #155 (Edited)
At this point, all that was left were the little details. Bleed the brakes, install driveshafts, torque u-bolts, add fluids, etc.

Eventually I got to the point where I was ready to fire the motor!



We were taking bets, would it fire first time? Maybe?

No.

Like EVERYTHING this was yet another battle. I think it took me about 3 or 4 days worth of tinkering.

I had fuel.

I had spark



I had compression

The motor spun over fast (freshly rebuilt starter, new Optima battery)

Fuel was fresh

Reajusted valves

Re checked timing.



Then rechecked it again

I rechecked my points.

Still would not run.

Also, a nice bonus, I saw that coolant was seeping out all around the head gasket. Nice.
 

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Discussion Starter #156 (Edited)
The pains continued. Like an idiot trying to piss in the corner of a round room, I just kept going around in circles trying to get this thing to work. I had spark, it was happening at the right time, I had fuel, I had compression. WTF!!!!!

Eventually one of the things I tried worked. I polished the terminals on my coil and distributor and put on a new coil wire. And it started!

Short video running at 2000rpm during cam break in.







 

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Discussion Starter #157
rollercoaster

I can't believe how rewarding it was to finally have it running!

After the cam break in, I readjusted the valves, retorqued the head bolts (which quelled the head gasket leak), changed the oil, bungee corded the gas can on the front, C-clamped a piece of wood on the frame to sit on and took it for a drive :D

They call this a "drivable chassis" and no joke, it is. There is even a gas pedal of sorts bolted to the back of the engine. I only took it up to about 10-15mph but was able to hit 3rd OD as well as all the other gears. Ultimate old school go-cart :D Sorry no pics though.
 

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Discussion Starter #158 (Edited)
So at this point I had a fully overhauled chassis. It was late April and the nice weather was finally here. I decided the best bet was to basically "clean up" the body and reinstall so I could enjoy it for the summer.

First step was stripping out the remainder of the P.O. wiring job. Actually to his credit the wiring wasn't half bad. It was labeled, it was logical, he used pretty decent wire, it even had a couple of fuses (but only a couple). I probably didn't need to replace it, but decided to anyway just for peace of mind.



This is about 1/2 of it...


Tub. (I love west coast bodies)


 

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Discussion Starter #159 (Edited)
Investigating the underside.



Some of the hat channel is rusted out...


But at least the floors are original and okay.
 

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Discussion Starter #160 (Edited)
Scraped off all the oil, grease, crud and loose rust. Washed it down with Marine Clean. Judging by the floor and up under the dash, the original color was Luzon Red.



Treated all the rusty and questionable spots with POR-15



Top coated with a layer of black tractor paint for a uniform look.



 
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