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Discussion Starter · #81 ·
I had installed a hydraulic pull type clutc linkage and it was really smooth. It took a good bit of leg muscle to release. It was about like the mechanical linkage on my first Dauntless jeep, so I just thought they had a really stiff clutch.
I checked out another guys jeep with all the same stuff but he had the advance adapters chain linkage. It was like night and day!
I went ahead and got one.

Got rid of all of this. By the way, the wilwood stuff I used leaks like a bitch.

And ultimately ended up with this.

This thing is awesome. I can push the clutch down with my hand. It's a simple design and it's heavy duty so I think it will last. My leg feels better already.
 

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Discussion Starter · #82 ·
I have to wonder how effective the mirrors are way out there up front?
Sorry for the delay with this, I had photobucket problems that slowed me down.
Here is a picture from eye level at the drivers seat.

As you can see here, they work really well. You can also see all my viewing devices. The trail camera screens, rear view mirror, traffic light viewer, and fender mounted mirrors. The traffic light viewer is an old school hot rod thing for use with chopped tops and visors. It is pretty much a necessity with my jeep.
 

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Discussion Starter · #83 ·
I did repair the trail damage to the roof. A little work with a hammer and dolly and a new piece of awning rail and it is good to go!

Now I need to address the problem with the hubs getting loose. This is a common problem for these hubs, especially with a locker installed. They loosen up every time I wheel. Hopefully these will help.

 

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Discussion Starter · #84 ·
My Howell tbi injection runs pretty good. I am still having issues with it running rich at times, setting a code 45. I finally got ahold of a scan tool to look at some real time data. Looks like the rpm reading is jumping around a lot.
I am running the stock delco distributor on the Dauntless with points to trigger an MSD-6 capacitive discharge ignition using an MSD Blaster coil. The MSD box has an output for the tach signal, which is said to be a clean square-wave signal. The tech guy at Howell said that it must be putting out a dirty signal because it is triggered by points. MSD doesn't really state how clean the signal is or whether it is affected by the type of triggering system. The setup I am using is right off of one of their diagrams, so I don't know. The guy did say that some people use the pertronix ignitor instead of the points successfully, so I ordered that setup, and will be putting it in later this week.
Anyone running the Howell TBI? I would love to know how you are getting a clean tach signal for the computer.
I did change out the points to a heavy duty set to eliminate "point bounce" as a cause of the problem. The rpm readings were exactly the same on the scantool before and after.
 

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Discussion Starter · #86 ·
Look for the Stage 8 locking axle nut and hub hardware Stage 8 Manual Locking Hub Fasteners My son used them on his front axle. Seems to work well.
Thanks. I tried to buy a set of those and I was told they were no longer available, so I went with the Warn stuff. I don't want to spread rumors, it's possible that it was only the vendor I was trying to purchase them from. I didn't check other vendors.
It did look like a better system, but part of the threads in my hub is stripped anyway, and the studs in the warn kit go all the way to the bottom. I was happy about that at least. Time will tell, I am hoping to go wheeling later this month.
 

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Discussion Starter · #87 ·
I installed the pertronix ignitor to clean up the signal to the MSD. It didn't work. The tach readings on the scantool were just as erratic as before, resulting in a rich condition and SES light coming on.
So I pulled the tach signal wire out of the harness and hung a temporary wire outside the body to eliminate possible interference from other wires. That didn't change anything either.
Then I pulled the pair of wires to the coil from the MSD and twisted them, as they were described as a twisted pair in the instructions. This didn't change anything either.
Then I eliminated the MSD box altogether and ran a ballast resistor to the coil using the ignitor in the distributor to trigger the coil. It does run a lot better. The tach signal is still erratic at idle, but is a lot steadier at speed. The oxygen sensor shows a lot happier engine most of the time, and the SES light is not coming on anymore. It is at least driveable right now, but the wiring harness is hacked up pretty good.
The tach signal at idle jumps around from 450 to 775 or 800, then back to 450 and up to 825 and so on. It reads around 2500 when I know it's going 3000 most of the time, but jumps down here and there to 1725 or so. That's what I mean by erratic! The cheap little analog tach I have always reads rock steady.
I'm thinking about a crank trigger for just the tbi set up with three equally spaced magnets to smooth out the signal. It's almost like it takes some kind of average which doesn't involve a whole revolution and so it thinks it is more or less based on the uneven firing sequence.
There was no cutting out or leaning out at high speed mashing the throttle with the newest setup, just good smooth power all the way.
 

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WILLYN, this is a little off the current topic, but do you mind showing some of your pedal setup in the cab? I'm gleaning quite a few ideas for my project from you here, and I'm curious what you are doing for pedals, in particular with the AA clutch mechanism.
thanks,
Brian
 

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Discussion Starter · #89 ·
WILLYN, this is a little off the current topic, but do you mind showing some of your pedal setup in the cab? I'm gleaning quite a few ideas for my project from you here, and I'm curious what you are doing for pedals, in particular with the AA clutch mechanism.
thanks,
Brian
Thanks for your interest! I can post some more pics, but probably not till Sunday. The clutch and brake pedals are the bone-stock original setup. They pivot at the frame and have the original levers on that end. The advance adapters unit attaches directly to the hole where the old linkage would have gone, it's a really easy deal.
Inside the cab is stock too, with a few mods. I cut the old flat steel pedals off of the round stems and welded on some oval ones, mainly because I liked the shape and they were a bit smaller. The best thing I did with these is to make a guide plate for the stems out of some 1/8" uhmw plastic. It keeps the pedal centered in the hole in the floor and does not squeak every time. I also used the spring and washer and felt washer seal thing on the back side.
One thing I will say is that the clutch pedal arm hits the header before the pedal hits the floor, limiting travel available. The spring and washer and felt washer hold the pedal slightly down also limiting travel. I could use more travel. The clutch, in order to release fully, is adjusted with no real free play and it releases all the way at the floor. I am a little concerned about the throwout bearing spinning all the time, but it is not making any noise. With the T-90, I can just put a new throwout bearing in every time I rebuild it and it will be ok.
If I was doing it all over I would make longer stems for the pedals and massage the header to allow more travel. The brake lever and pedal work perfectly, but I would extend the stem on it too just to match the clutch.
I don't have any body lift to speak of, but if you did the pedal geometry would need more attention.
 

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Discussion Starter · #92 · (Edited)
Oh well, sorry to disappoint! When I was at that point I was still in the "keep it simple" and "work with what you have" state of mind. That was early on, before the sickness took hold and the downward spiral began.
I have since then banged my frame on rocks very near the low hanging pedal assembly and I was concerned for its safety. If I was doing it again I would be considering hanging pedals for that reason.
The two complete wildwood setups are what it took to get it working. I first used the 7/8 master cylinder with the 7/8 slave thinking that 1:1 would equal what the factory travel was, but I couldn't get it to release. The leverage factor would have been better with that. Then I changed up to the 1-1/8 master and got enough travel but the leverage was not as good and I was getting a "Popeye" style left leg. It was the worst part of driving it at the time. The first slave cylinder leaked pretty much from the start, even though it was not binding and in a nice straight line. The second one went many more miles but was leaking when I pulled it. There was only ever one of each in there at a time. The leftover parts have joined the ranks of all the other stuff that I will probably always save and never use.
The clamp-on fluid reservoirs that came with the master cylinders are supposed to seal with an o-ring, but the seam left from the plastic molding process runs right through the o-ring seat in two places and even with some smoothing in that area they never did seal. The whole deal was pretty much a dud in my opinion.
 

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Your experience makes me wary of the Wilwood stuff, which I was thinking about for my brake master. I'd like to use a mechanical clutch mechanism like you have, but I've been considering an aftermarket pedal setup if I can afford it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #95 ·
Here's what is going on with the tbi.
I got this for the odd-fire, note the locations of the magnets is not even
So I installed it in place of the points triggering the MSD and it still ran the same.
The scantool rpm readings were whacked.
So I eliminated the MSD and used just the coil and ballast triggered by the Pertronix. It looks like this right now.


It is running the best it has with the Howell injection, really smooth power all the way up. The air/fuel gauge shows it is right in the narrow band almost all the time, almost perfect.
At idle however it still goes rich. Not enough to throw a code but still rich. The scantool shows a way more erratic rpm at idle than it does at speed, although it is still somewhat erratic at speed.
So I guess this is the problem everybody has when they say it is hard to make it work. I read on pirate somewhere that someone used a crank trigger with even spacing to make theirs work, and I was thinking about doing that.
Then I got to looking at my spare distributor.

See that space on the plate where the condenser goes? If I am using the MSD box with points I don't use the condenser. That means the entire space to the right of the points is empty.
So I started thinking about using the distributor for two purposes.
Then I bought the Pertronix unit for the even-fire V6. Its magnets are evenly spaced.


I trimmed, bent, and drilled the Pertronix pickup to screw down to the plate with the existing points and condenser screws, and attached it next to the points.


The even-fire magnet ring is installed instead of the odd-fire.

So I am planning to put this in the distributor in the jeep soon. I will be going back to the MSD triggered by the points on the original odd-fire points cam, and firing the coil with the MSD. The Pertronix is simply there to provide a consistent square-wave tach signal for the computer, and will not be wired into the ignition in any way. I'm sort of making an even crank trigger using the ready made Pertronix parts. The Pertronix has a red and a black wire. I will provide 12 volt power to the red. The black usually is used to ground the coil and unground the coil through the metal plate the unit is on. I am going to make this a circuit by bringing 12 volts to it through a light bulb. Every time the magnets pass the sensor the circuit will be turned off. I will wire the tach signal lead into this circuit and hopefully pick up a nice clean evenly timed square-wave signal for the computer.
The computer will have no idea that the firing is uneven, and should read a nice steady rpm, and smooth it out to perfection! Sounds good to me anyway, we will see how it goes. If that fails, I will revert to the current setup because it's already pretty awesome.
 

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I think you are on the right path for the ignition signal, that has always been the hick-up with an odd-fire and fuel injection. It sure would be nice if everything could be contained in the dizzy and get it to work right. I thought I read of someone doing multiple pickups in an HEI dizzy also.
 

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Discussion Starter · #97 ·
I think you are on the right path for the ignition signal, that has always been the hick-up with an odd-fire and fuel injection. It sure would be nice if everything could be contained in the dizzy and get it to work right. I thought I read of someone doing multiple pickups in an HEI dizzy also.
Thanks for the input, I appreciate it. Just the fact that you didn't point out any obvious flaws in the logic gives me a confidence boost. It's running good at the moment and I'm probably going wheeling next weekend, and I'm working on another jeep in the garage, so this will probably wait until after that for testing.
I am slightly concerned about EMI with the ignitor leads being next to the points wire for a few inches, so I ordered some shielded wire for that. Once out of the distributor I plan to run the Pertronix wiring down the other side of the manifold and not through the same areas as the MSD wiring. I'm keeping my fingers crossed.
The tech guy at Pertronix was very helpful with advice about the inner workings of the unit, but obviously couldn't really say this would work for sure. His only concern was that the points would cause EMI. I kind of think that if that was going to be a problem then the 40,000 volts or so going through the cap and rotor would also be a problem, but I'm no electronics guy.
 

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Discussion Starter · #98 ·
I made these a while back to help my poor old knees.

They bolt to the bottom of my rock sliders. As I may have said before, I left the ends open for simplicity, so I was able to make them easily removable with some tabbed bolts. I take them off when I go wheeling.

I went to AOAA in Pennsylvania with the club last weekend and the fuel injection was excellent. Not one stall! It did get a little lean going up the highway at about 70 at the highest elevation the computer has seen and against a strong headwind. It started popping in the throttle body and I had to pull over and slow down. It smoothed right out and onward I went. I just think the computer had not been there before and didn't know exactly what to do. At trail speeds the thing chugs along just right.
 

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My T-90 leaked out of the rear shifter rail holes. Lots of oil would come out and run down everything. I made a plate to bolt over them with a gasket like others I have seen. It stopped the leak, but resulted in a hydraulic lock-up that made it real difficult to get into reverse or second gears. So I pulled it back off and added vents. It shifts really well now, no hydraulic delay. Go ahead and laugh, it does look ridiculous!

First off, I just read through you r entire thread for the first time. Your skill and creativity are amazing. I can barely bolt stock stuff together.

I think your vent system on the shifter looks cool, kind of steam punk-ish, and I'm sure it works great. I'm opting for a little less noticeable mod to take care of the hydro-lock issue in the T90 shift tower. Someone on a different forum suggested grinding the round shift rail flat on one side to allow the gear oil to flow back along the rail. Yours system is much more elegant, but just tossing this in as a possible alternative.
You can kind of see it in this picture.
 

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Discussion Starter · #100 ·
First off, I just read through you r entire thread for the first time. Your skill and creativity are amazing. I can barely bolt stock stuff together.

I think your vent system on the shifter looks cool, kind of steam punk-ish, and I'm sure it works great. I'm opting for a little less noticeable mod to take care of the hydro-lock issue in the T90 shift tower. Someone on a different forum suggested grinding the round shift rail flat on one side to allow the gear oil to flow back along the rail. Yours system is much more elegant, but just tossing this in as a possible alternative.
You can kind of see it in this picture.
Thank you for the compliment, I'm glad you like my work.
I had read somewhere to file a groove in the bottom of the bore to serve the purpose, but it seemed like a lot of filing. I hadn't thought of grinding the rail, but I'm sure that works fine too. A guy had told me he added vents like mine but instead of back in, he ran them to the transfer case vent. I wasn't wanting to move the oil that far, so I did this. "Elegant" is a great way to describe mine, I'm sticking with that! I'm trying to maintain a sense of humor with this jeep, it's a coping mechanism!
Speaking of oil transfer, here's an interesting tidbit. I used the Novak rebuild kit the first time I rebuilt. It had sealed bearings on both ends of the tranny, somewhat separating the transfer case from the tranny. It seemed to work ok. Then when my cheap junk input shaft crapped out some pieces attacked the bearings, so I needed a complete rebuild. This time the bearing for the rear of the T-90 was open and unsealed, allowing for complete transfer. I will say now that in the middle of a long steep uphill grade on the road to where I wheel the transmission starts to sing. It quiets back down after I crest the hill.
I am thinking that the oil ends up more in the transfer case and less in the tranny on a steep ascent. I believe the pass through holes between the two were placed in such a way that the transfer case pushes oil into the transmission hole, and when it gets too full it just runs back out the output bearing.
To top up, I open the transfer case fill plug and transmission fill plug and fill the transmission until oil starts to run out of the transfer case fill hole. Otherwise you can way overfill the transfer case while waiting for the oil to be level with the fill hole, which I think is higher than the pass through holes.
I stuck a fitting on the transmission fill hole and have about a foot long piece of clear hose clamped on to it with a cap in the end. I can squeeze a regular bottle of oil without a pump into there anytime I need to.
 
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