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there is a ton of info on this forum about building 4links, on truggies, buggies, jeeps, ect. but all these seem to be geared towards rockcrawling, a few for street use.

my buddy and i are thinking about linking up the rear of his full size blazer. this truck it pretty much built for pismo and mud, he has a yota for trails and rocks.

i was thinking the best option would be a double triangulated 4 link, i was also thinking of a wishbone 3 link. but just because that works for rockcrawling, doesnt mean it will work for hittin dunes.

so really, the question is what would you do differently when designing a rear suspention for sand dunes than for rockcrawling.

Jeff
 

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Sounds like overkill for just sand and mud. Why not leaf springs? Just the challenge of building it? (which I totally understand)

You can have a boatlod of adjustment if you get some adjustable shocks and play around with adding and removing leafs. For an hours' work it would be a completely different rig every weekend.

-tom
 

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A properly designed triangulated 4 link will work for any situation. You may want different anti-squat # for mud racing than rock crawling though.
 

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LandCroozer said:
Sounds like overkill for just sand and mud. Why not leaf springs? Just the challenge of building it? (which I totally understand)

You can have a boatlod of adjustment if you get some adjustable shocks and play around with adding and removing leafs. For an hours' work it would be a completely different rig every weekend.

-tom
Not at all my jeep takes more of a beating during duneing than all other time put together. (especialy the motor!)

I would look at the rear suspetion on some desert or stadium racing trucks. For the dunes you need it to soak up some big bumps.

beerman
 

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Jeffh555 said:
so really, the question is what would you do differently when designing a rear suspention for sand dunes than for rockcrawling.

Jeff

Design it with less anti-squat (compared to the crawler nembers you typically read), and minimize anti-squat gain throughout the wheel travel as a preference over a flat roll axis. Traction is much less in sand and mud, promoting more wheel hop if the AS% is high, and with the lower traction the roll steer effect is not as much of a consideration as stable traction (favoring a predictable AS% throughout the travel range).

FWIW, save money on the suspension and spend it on good adjustable dampening shocks and springs that resist fade. Make it lightweight.

Happy Trails!
 
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