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Discussion Starter #1
Step 1 - Sawzall.





Step 2 - Build a "frame"



Step 3 - Hot glue some cloth




Step 4 - Mix a hot batch of Fiberglass Resin (Bonus High :rasta:)




Step 5 - Go post pics on Pirate.com your done.

 

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Why don't you inform us all a little more on glassing? I know I, for one, would like to learn something about it. What do you use, where do you get it, is it expensive, what's the process???
 

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:rasta: :smokin: My head is still Spinning!

'glass is pretty easy, Go pick up a quart of resin (should come with hardener) , Grab an old t-shirt (free but has no stength). To get strength you'll need fiberglass mat. you can allply this to the "mold" you're about to make by simply laying it on top of the shirt.

make a L out of some wood. staple one side of a piece of t-shirt to the top of the L, stertch the shirt to bottom of the L and try to get it smooth... then staple it. you should now have sort of "lean-to tent"

Get some (or one) CHEAP 2" paint brushes(they will be hard as a ROCK when your done so get cheap ones.... NOT FOAM!!)

wear rubber gloves 'caus this shit burns!!!!!!!

Mix up a batch (use the directions for mixing on the back)

Paint it on the shirt and make sure it soaks thru.

Grab a beverage or 2 of choice and enjoy your high. a couple hours later, You have a killer high, a warm beer, and a shirt 'glassed to a couple pieces of wood that is now harder than a left turn at a shopping mall.

Go try it. It'll only cost you about $10-$15 and after you do that, You'll have a good idea of how to apply it to your project!
 

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OKAY - Things I've learned.

1. Rubber Gloves!
2. The "mold fabric" can be any old stuff (blue in the pics)
3. Strech the mold fabric tight (it will sag) and make sure it is attached!! As the glass hardnes it will pull.
4. Rubber Gloves
5. Use the fiberglass matt that they sell in the store (wal-mart) - to make layers over your mold. The more layers the stronger.
6. Fiberglass resin does go bad, buy it from a place that sells alot (pepboys)
7. Rubber Gloves
8. Mix up small (16 oz) batches. - paint mixing buckets from wal-mart.
9. You can keeping adding more resin and hardner to your original batch, as long as you do it before it gels up.
10. Make the mix "hot" - a little more hardner than called for on lable. Buy extra hardner.
11. Get some cheap paint brushes to apply resin to cloth.
12. Rubber gloves



oh yea, rubber gloves.
 

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So what's left Max? Looks like the tailgate, windshield, and hood.:D
 

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Discussion Starter #9
85TrailToy said:
So what's left Max? Looks like the tailgate, windshield, and hood.:D
nutin but tub. :smokin: It's a samurai in spirit, but a toyota at heart :flipoff2:



Hey Frank!!! - Wouldn't happen to have one of these I could borrow. Would ya?
 

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zukota said:


nutin but tub. :smokin: It's a samurai in spirit, but a toyota at heart :flipoff2:



Hey Frank!!! - Wouldn't happen to have one of these I could borrow. Would ya?
The shifter housing? Yeah I have one. Send me your address.
 

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For a cleaner and stronger part, do not use mat fiberglass. Mat is really just a bulk filler, and has poor strength. You will only find it in consumer items, cars and boats. High performance stuff like real boats and aircraft will use very little if any mat.

2 or 3 layers of 6 oz volin glass would have resulted in a thinner, lighter and stronger layup.

Only use just enough resin to wet the glass out. You do not want to see any dry (white) glass, and you also do not want to see any wet puddles of resin in the lay up. (All of those white spots in his lay up are dry spots.)

A "hot" batch of resin will usually result in a brittle resin. Epoxy based systems are usually well liked for performance as they are more flexable. But polyester resins are easier to use, clean up, and work with. The catalyst is uaully just MEK. Typical polyester resins can have a cure time of 1 hour, but adjusting the catalyst can kick that up to the point of fire. :eek: The ultimate "hot" batch will cure in about a minute, and generate so much heat that it self ignites. Not a good thing. Follow the directions, and play.

I like Volin glass as it is a rather easy glass to work with, it shapes well, and does not itch! S-glass is very strong, does not like to bend, and will have you itching like crazy!

Hope that helps some.

-Wayne
 

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rotozuk said:
For a cleaner and stronger part, do not use mat fiberglass. Mat is really just a bulk filler, and has poor strength. You will only find it in consumer items, cars and boats. High performance stuff like real boats and aircraft will use very little if any mat.

2 or 3 layers of 6 oz volin glass would have resulted in a thinner, lighter and stronger layup.

Only use just enough resin to wet the glass out. You do not want to see any dry (white) glass, and you also do not want to see any wet puddles of resin in the lay up. (All of those white spots in his lay up are dry spots.)

A "hot" batch of resin will usually result in a brittle resin. Epoxy based systems are usually well liked for performance as they are more flexable. But polyester resins are easier to use, clean up, and work with. The catalyst is uaully just MEK. Typical polyester resins can have a cure time of 1 hour, but adjusting the catalyst can kick that up to the point of fire. :eek: The ultimate "hot" batch will cure in about a minute, and generate so much heat that it self ignites. Not a good thing. Follow the directions, and play.

I like Volin glass as it is a rather easy glass to work with, it shapes well, and does not itch! S-glass is very strong, does not like to bend, and will have you itching like crazy!

Hope that helps some.

-Wayne

Okay - good info but time for a reality check.

I think the fiberglass matt that they sell for consumer goods (cars & boats...) is good enough for a rear inner fender on a $150 trail rig. We are not trying to build a comercial plane.

The white spots in my junk is air pockets between layers. I understand that air pockets are not stong, but they are deff. not dry.

My "hot" batch comment may have been out of line, however I did specifiy to just use "a little more hardner than called for on lable." And I think that is still good advice... Again, we are talking about a inner fender of a trail rig, not a wing. The bennifit of a faster drying time vs. strenght is this situation is worth it (to me).

Still some kool chit. - do you do this for a living?
 

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Dam now i wish I didn't cut the rear off mine! NAW... to many tree's in PA it would be gone any way.


Looks good and good idea!!
 

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rotozuk said:
For a cleaner and stronger part, do not use mat fiberglass. Mat is really just a bulk filler, and has poor strength. You will only find it in consumer items, cars and boats. High performance stuff like real boats and aircraft will use very little if any mat.

2 or 3 layers of 6 oz volin glass would have resulted in a thinner, lighter and stronger layup.

Only use just enough resin to wet the glass out. You do not want to see any dry (white) glass, and you also do not want to see any wet puddles of resin in the lay up. (All of those white spots in his lay up are dry spots.)

A "hot" batch of resin will usually result in a brittle resin. Epoxy based systems are usually well liked for performance as they are more flexable. But polyester resins are easier to use, clean up, and work with. The catalyst is uaully just MEK. Typical polyester resins can have a cure time of 1 hour, but adjusting the catalyst can kick that up to the point of fire. :eek: The ultimate "hot" batch will cure in about a minute, and generate so much heat that it self ignites. Not a good thing. Follow the directions, and play.

I like Volin glass as it is a rather easy glass to work with, it shapes well, and does not itch! S-glass is very strong, does not like to bend, and will have you itching like crazy!

Hope that helps some.

-Wayne







USE THE SEARCH NEWBIE........................... oops, Wrong flame :flipoff2:


I've YET to have a batch "self ignite" an trust me. Ive tryed. To do that you would prolly have to use a 50/50 mix or something

Yes a hot batch will result in a brittle resin, However where WE are it happens to be in the 20's and 30's outside and getting the garage upto a workable temp is not that easy hence the reason for the "hot batch" (as per the instructions)

I gotta go build a plane. :D
Later,
Mike
 

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Hey Max,

Hope you did not take it as a flame.. Sorry about that. I love the fabric molding idea. That was totally new to me. ;)

The mat glass will probably have the very same price, and might even cover a larger area, and will certainly have a cleaner appearance, and less little nasty pointing things to grab you and rip up your gear. also easy to wet out. It all good. :D Mat is great when you want to add bulk to stuff.

I had a friend that had a family business building yachts. On one of the days they were laying up a large hull (50 foot I think) he poured the polyester resin into a large 5 gallon bucket, and added catalyst, then his dad came over and added catalyst, and then his uncle... Seems about 4 guys came by and added catalyst to the bucket no knowing the other guys had. The last guy picked up the bucket to drag it over to the work area and noticed it was starting to kick off.. Then he noticed it was getting hotter... About this time he dropped it, and poof. Sor the story goes. I tried to duplicate it with a small amount of resin, and it just got really hot, and melted the mixing cup.

Hot batching to limits is fine. But if you have a 1 hour set time for a resin on a fender project, that is probably about right.

I guess I should mention, DO use disposable gloves with this shit, and try to have a lot of fresh air blowing around. You will want to have gloves as this can get to be pretty messy job, and as the resin starts setting up, you will probably have some shit sticking to you that you don't want sticking to you. :rolleyes:

I just recommend you avoid S-glass if you can. I hate that itchy shit!

My background is simply hobby relate stuff. Started building R/C airplanes in my own molds and the such. Then assisted a friend that was building a 2 place plane from carbon, kevlar and glass with epoxy resins. We did some nice big layups on that one!

-Wayne
 
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