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i just bought the power tank system ( 2 pt10's) and am thinking of running my arb's off them and am wondering if any of you do it. what are the advantages or disadvantages or your likes or dislikes?? any input will be greatly apprisheated.


Thanks, Scott
 

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I use a homemade co2 setup for my arb. Don't have lots of info, but it works fine. I used it cause I had it. Had to chase a few leaks at first, but I don't think it leaks much now.
 

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Bones said:
I have the same setup...not one complaint. Works great and it portable. I uses it in the house for my air nailer as well :D

My attempt at write-up :flipoff2:

You don't happen to know anywhere that has those ARB solenoid valves...I want to get one for my air tank so that I can use either my air tank to backup the ARB compressor, or the ARB compressor to backup the air tank for filling tires, but I was wanting to isolate it using one of the ARB solenoids.

Thanks,
David
 

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CornbredNE said:

You don't happen to know anywhere that has those ARB solenoid valves...I want to get one for my air tank so that I can use either my air tank to backup the ARB compressor, or the ARB compressor to backup the air tank for filling tires, but I was wanting to isolate it using one of the ARB solenoids.
Thanks,
David
Pulled from another list long ago. Don't know if it is still good.
Mac Valves, Inc. 1800-MAC-VLVS in Wixom, MI.
Website http://macvalves.com

The whole assy (both coil and valve) 35A-AAA-DDBA-1BA
Valve only - 35A-AAA or Coil only - DDBA-1BA
stubby exhaust muffler - description F18, mfr code ALWM price each .64c

They go for $17. for the complete assembly
 

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CornbredNE said:



You don't happen to know anywhere that has those ARB solenoid valves...I want to get one for my air tank so that I can use either my air tank to backup the ARB compressor, or the ARB compressor to backup the air tank for filling tires, but I was wanting to isolate it using one of the ARB solenoids.

Thanks,
David
I'd contact ARB and go from there.
 

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Kongs4x4.com stocks all of the individual ARB components.

I have run a power tank for my ARBs for 2 years with no problems. The only drawback to this setup that I have found is that if a leak goes undetected,you could end up with no lockers.
I am installing an electric compresssor for redundancy.
 

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I have been running my ARB's off of a Co2 tank for about 3 years now with no complaints. I use two pneumatic switches that I got from Gulf Coast Rovers

http://www.gulfcoastrovers.com/all/switch/index.htm

They work very well and the whole setup is non-electronic.

Here is a pict of the pneumatic switch:

Billster
 

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FrankenRover said:
I have been running my ARB's off of a Co2 tank for about 3 years now with no complaints. I use two pneumatic switches that I got from Gulf Coast Rovers

http://www.gulfcoastrovers.com/all/switch/index.htm

They work very well and the whole setup is non-electronic.

Here is a pict of the pneumatic switch:

Billster
I like that setup a lot better than mine. If/when my ARB solenoid goes bad I may do this.
 

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Bones said:
I have the same setup...not one complaint. Works great and it portable. I uses it in the house for my air nailer as well :D

My attempt at write-up :flipoff2:
Yes, that portable ARB is quite handy for when you're walking up a steep slippery hill looking for a place to take a dump.:flipoff2: :flipoff2:
 

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randii said:
Simple search on C02 and ARB:
http://www.pirate4x4.com/forum/sear...d=416699&sortby=lastpost&sortorder=descending

There has been some discussion over the years about the corrosive qualities of C02 and potential damage to the ARB. Personally, I think this is not a problem unless you leave your ARB locked all the time, but that's just my opinion, backed up by years of use. :p

Randii
Pretty much malarkey. CO2 is non-corrosive, and is a dry gas. People assume that since the outer portion of the regulator and the hose freezes up that the gas must have water (h20) in it. Which is untrue. The water content of compressed air (read that which comes from your ARB compressor) is MUCH higher than that of compressed or liquid CO2.

I have run my ARB's from a CO2 tank for years without any problems (except forgetting to close the valve and draining a large portion of the tank overnight because of a slow leak). I recently grenaded a rear ARB (for a number of reasons), but the inside of the diff and the o-rings were perfect. No sign of any corrosion at all (2 years plus using Co2).

I think the only way you can damage the ARB with CO2 is to apply too much pressure to the system and blow out the o-rings.

Billster
 

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Pretty much malarkey. CO2 is non-corrosive, and is a dry gas.
Old Scout would (will?) disagree... the concern is not at all related to the state change or moisture content.

FWIW, I have more respect for his opinion, with his professional pedigree.

I have run my ARB's from a CO2 tank for years...
Yeah, me too... but you read that, right? :rolleyes:
Mine works... yours works (but not as long as mine, apparently :p )... and the original poster? Well, it will probably work for his, as well...

...but it is not without long-term risk. The unresolved question is HOW long? For regular use, the gears may wear out first!

Randii
 

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Carbon dioxide combines with water to form carbonic acid which is very aggressive to steel. Pitting is steep walled, sharp edged, interconnected, with possible iron carbonate scale deposits.


H2O + CO2 = H2CO3
This equation indicates that one molecule of water reacts with one molecule of carbon dioxide to make carbonic acid H2CO3. Notice that the total numbers of atoms of each element on each side is the same. We say the equation balances. Also, notice that the '=' sign in the reaction indicates that we are dealing with an equilibrium.
 

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Chemical Compatability Results


Chemical Selected Carbonic Acid
The chemicals which match your search results are listed below:

Material Compatibility
304 stainless steel A1- Excellent
316 stainless steel A- Excellent
ABS plastic N/A
Acetal (Delrin®) B1- Good
Aluminum B1- Good
Brass D- Severe Effect
Bronze B- Good
Buna N (Nitrile) D- Severe Effect
Carbon graphite A- Excellent
Carbon Steel D- Severe Effect
Carpenter 20 A- Excellent
Cast iron D- Severe Effect
Ceramic Al203 A- Excellent
Ceramic magnet N/A
ChemRaz (FFKM) N/A
Copper N/A
CPVC A- Excellent
EPDM B- Good
Epoxy A2- Excellent
Fluorocarbon (FKM) A- Excellent
Hastelloy-C® A2- Excellent
Hypalon® C- Fair
Hytrel® D- Severe Effect
Kalrez A- Excellent
Kel-F® A- Excellent
LDPE B2- Good
Natural rubber C- Fair
Neoprene D- Severe Effect
NORYL® A1- Excellent
Nylon A1- Excellent
Polycarbonate A1- Excellent
Polyetherether Ketone (PEEK) A- Excellent
Polypropylene A- Excellent
Polyurethane A- Excellent
PPS (Ryton®) A- Excellent
PTFE (Teflon®) A- Excellent
PVC A2- Excellent
PVDF (Kynar®) A- Excellent
Silicone A- Excellent
Titanium B1- Good
Tygon® N/A
Viton® A- Excellent




Ratings -- Chemical Effect
A = Excellent.
B = Good -- Minor Effect, slight corrosion
or discoloration.
C = Fair -- Moderate Effect, not recommended
for continuous use. Softening, loss of strength,
swelling may occur.
D = Severe Effect, not recommended for ANY use.
N/A = Information Not Available. Explanation of Footnotes
1. Satisfactory to 72°F (22° C)
2. Satisfactory to 120°F (48° C)
 

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Allright, I will bite on this one:

There are four questions that should be considered:

1) Does the use of compress C02 from a liquid source have a significant quantity of H20 (water) contaminant (like compressed air does usually (especially here in Houston with 98% humidity), and or does it produce said H20 when it is converted from a liquid state to a gas state? (my answer would be no)

2) If C02 mingles with H20 around exposed steel, will this cause corrosion? Knowing that the combination can produce an acid. (my answer would be yes, but corrosion would also happen without the C02)

3) Does C02 mingle with H20 in an ARB locker (or differential case for that matter), if you have competent seals and don't have standing water in the diff case itself? (my answer would be no)

4) Does C02 by itself cause corrosion of metal parts or breakdown of rubber seals? (my answer would be no)

Old Scout? What do you say? In a semi closed system (completely closed if you use a oneway check valve on your exhaust port) with very, very low flow and extremely small volume of gas, exactly how much water do you think you are gonna get in the system when using CO2 to actuate the ARB (and we are not talking about 100 on/offs in a row)?

With this small volume of CO2 required to actuate the ARB, I would think that the gas used would already be in a gas state on the top of the cylinder. When the gas was released from the tank (again a very very small volume) it would be "replaced" by conversion of liquid Co2 to gas (which does cool the cylinder). I would expect that very little if any of the gas used to actuate the ARB would come directly from the "newly" converted liquid even in a full tank unless you flipped the switch a bunch of times in a row.

I also submit an example that shows retrospective "proof" that using CO2 as a compressed gas source does not "create" significant moisture (read water) in a closed system: I have been filling and deflating my last set of SSR's (35x14.5x15's) from about 25 psi to 8psi to 25 psi for the last two years exclusively with CO2 (never used compressed air from any source). I broke down the tires (beadlocks btw which did not leak) last year and expected to find at least some moisture inside. All four were BONE dry inside. Additionally, there were some old deep scratches in the wheels on the inside that exposed the bare steel, and there was no corrosion at all.

Anyway, I think this is a good discussion and welcome any real input on the science of it (not just the hearsay). If I am incorrect, I will happily eat some humble pie.

Billster (who knows a little about gases)

ps. I see Old Scout has responded already (thanks man) while I was writing. Lets see what he has to say about these questions as well.

btw. I did not dispute that water plus C02 created an acid. Only that the inside of the diff would not see a significant combination of the two.
 

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Opps, forgot to mention that my ARB failure came from a bent axle housing which pushed both axles into the diff shearing one fo the center pins and bending the outer casing.:flipoff2:

Billster
 

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Opps, forgot to mention that my ARB failure came from a bent axle housing which pushed both axles into the diff shearing one fo the center pins and bending the outer casing.:flipoff2:

Billster
 

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Chemical Selected Carbon Dioxide (dry)
The chemicals which match your search results are listed below:

Material Compatibility
304 stainless steel A- Excellent
316 stainless steel A1- Excellent
ABS plastic B- Good
Acetal (Delrin®) A- Excellent
Aluminum B1- Good
Brass B- Good
Bronze A- Excellent
Buna N (Nitrile) A- Excellent
Carbon graphite A- Excellent
Carbon Steel A- Excellent
Carpenter 20 A- Excellent
Cast iron D- Severe Effect
Ceramic Al203 N/A
Ceramic magnet N/A
ChemRaz (FFKM) A- Excellent
Copper N/A
CPVC A- Excellent
EPDM B- Good
Epoxy A1- Excellent
Fluorocarbon (FKM) A- Excellent
Hastelloy-C® A- Excellent
Hypalon® B- Good
Hytrel® A1- Excellent
Kalrez A- Excellent
Kel-F® A- Excellent
LDPE A1- Excellent
Natural rubber B- Good
Neoprene B- Good
NORYL® A1- Excellent
Nylon A1- Excellent
Polycarbonate N/A
Polyetherether Ketone (PEEK) A- Excellent
Polypropylene A2- Excellent
Polyurethane A- Excellent
PPS (Ryton®) A- Excellent
PTFE (Teflon®) A- Excellent
PVC A2- Excellent
PVDF (Kynar®) A- Excellent
Silicone B- Good
Titanium A- Excellent
Tygon® N/A
Viton® B- Good



Ratings -- Chemical Effect
A = Excellent.
B = Good -- Minor Effect, slight corrosion
or discoloration.
C = Fair -- Moderate Effect, not recommended
for continuous use. Softening, loss of strength,
swelling may occur.
D = Severe Effect, not recommended for ANY use.
N/A = Information Not Available.
 
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