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Discussion Starter #1
So i broke all 6 ARP hub stud and dowel pins

I swapped to a spare hub assembly w/stock studs, after some research I'm not so sure the ARP studs are worth the money.

isn't it true that the bolts(studs) in a bolted joint theorectically shouldn't take any of the shear load and only be loaded in tension.

Wouldn't cone washers create a better bolted joint and therefore better fit a bolted joint model?

thoughts?

I think as long as they're tight they should be somewhat equal (stock vs ARP)
 

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um my ARP's use the cones washer.

It reads like your not using conewashers with the arps. I have been beating on mine for 2 years have never had an issue. A buddy blew out 2 hubgears( before bobby started makign them) with the arps not even flinching.

Biggest issu is tightening
 

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Discussion Starter #3
using cone washers on both
I've blown hub gears, dials, chromo hub gears, broken dowel pins and the arp studs haven't broke till now. But would the stock studs have held up too? Nothing would/should have held together a few feet off the ground, full throttle, landing AND I left the front line locks on-- OOPs

just wonder if it is really worth it to run ARP's if the increased shear strenght isn't necessary in a bolted joint
 

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yeah, if you didn't use the cone washers with your hub, you're an idiot. what did you think was supposed to go in the space where the cone washer used to be?

*edit posted about 1 sec. after you. all of the fasteners that hold the lockout to the hub body have a shear force on them every time you apply power to the wheel. how is shear force not applicable when you have two flat surfaces mounted together with a normal resistance to turning at the same speed, which is based on the friction with the ground?

"Wouldn't cone washers create a better bolted joint and therefore better fit a bolted joint model?" this is pretty cryptic...i'm not sure what you're trying to say. why would bolts be better?
 

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Hard to say. I have seen stocks studs break but everyone always says they were tight before they broke.

inspecting everyrun and through out they day might keep stock studs alive for awhile, but with how cheap the ARPS are why not buy them?
 

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Discussion Starter #7
"Wouldn't cone washers create a better bolted joint and therefore better fit a bolted joint model?" this is pretty cryptic...i'm not sure what you're trying to say. why would bolts be better?
sorry to confuse

Theorectially no shear load is transfered to the bolt in a "perfect" bolted joint
the bolt/stud only sees tension from preload and the shear is taken by friction due to the preload

A cone washer would create a better "perfect" bolted joint by more evenly distributing the tension to the mating surfaces and allowing a higher preload.
 

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okay, i understand. the only problem is that those six studs/bolts in stock diameter could not be tightened tight enough for the force of static friction between the hub body and lockout body to be greater than the force of the axle shaft trying to twist the lockout body off of the hub body. you're looking a a lot of torque on those puny little studs. in this case it is a lot of shear force that's why the six dowel pins help so much. also, the cone washers do distribute the tension as well as center the lockout body, they don't allow a higher preload though. the preload is determined by the tensile strength of the fastener, or probably in this case the point at which the threads would fail in the hub body.

*edit why do you keep saying "A cone washer would create a better "perfect" bolted joint"? what do you mean "would?" if you're using the cone washers, then it "does." still makes it sound like you aren't using cone washers.
 

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okay, i understand. the only problem is that those six studs/bolts in stock diameter could not be tightened tight enough for the force of static friction between the hub body and lockout body to be greater than the force of the axle shaft trying to twist the lockout body off of the hub body. you're looking a a lot of torque on those puny little studs. in this case it is a lot of shear force that's why the six dowel pins help so much. also, the cone washers do distribute the tension as well as center the lockout body, they don't allow a higher preload though. the preload is determined by the tensile strength of the fastener, or probably in this case the point at which the threads would fail in the hub body.

*edit why do you keep saying "A cone washer would create a better "perfect" bolted joint"? what do you mean "would?" if you're using the cone washers, then it "does." still makes it sound like you aren't using cone washers.

I believe this is the benefit. You can torque the ARP studs tighter than the factory studs, creating a higher friction force.

What did you torque the studs to?
 

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cheap? $70 a set
that's a 1/10th the cost of a 60
where to get them? other than FROR - good place but can I get them locally? I went to the part stores with a stocker and their book doesn't show metric shit
$70 is cheap to me for peace of mind... maybe not to you.

so buy a 60. :D At a local comp we just had this weekend running trails, a jeep running 60 with 30 spline new stock axles, kept breaking stub shafts, the buggy on toys with a 4.3v6 didn't break anything :grinpimp: so be ready to beef that 60 on top of the buying price.
 

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and that's probably why you have six broken studs...
That'd be my guess. They were likely either undertorqued, or overtorqued and stretched.

I just installed a set last weekend, before I did, I asked the man:

Brian Ellinger said:
You just want the studs fairly snug in the knuckle and hub. Double nut works perfect. Torque on the knuckle nuts 110-120 ft lbs. torque on the hubs ~30-35 ft lbs.

Brian
 

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The ARP's take a higher torque load, and a higher tensile strength. Thus they can be torqued higher, thus more clamping force. Yes with the cones, the studs should be trying to stretch, and in perfect shear (not bending like an oversize bolt hole would be). The hub studs have proven themselves, to many folks. I am basing that on MANY customers that used to snap stock ones with regularity, now not snapping our ARP studs.

Myself broken stock ones, and I have not been able to snap the ARP's.
 

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Damn, now I have to torque them after you break them! I know we have torqued them good before. Just sucks that you can't find the part other than FROR. Kinda nice to give the local places some business since they are the small shops and support the local guys.
 
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