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you should be able to glue those little decorative covers back onto the needle no problem. I'd use epoxy and not anything cyanoacrylate/superglue. You will avoid the fogging of the plastic from the fumes.
 

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Still have some parts leftover from the offroad allroad project, like arnott bags and bilstein shocks, roof rack, computadora scanner chingadera, dunno what else, few boxes of misc. bits and pieces. Shoot me a PM if interested, will make you a good deal on all that stuff.
 

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Discussion Starter #25
Still have some parts leftover from the offroad allroad project, like arnott bags and bilstein shocks, roof rack, computadora scanner chingadera, dunno what else, few boxes of misc. bits and pieces. Shoot me a PM if interested, will make you a good deal on all that stuff.
Awesome, I'll definitely be sending you a PM at some point in the future about that. Once I get it up and running and everything figured out, I'll have a better idea of what I need.

I'm assuming you're Jesse_At_TLT? It's a shame your build didn't continue, it was just getting good! Still lots of inspiration and good info there, though. I've got it bookmarked.

Thanks everyone! Can't wait to start making some progress on pulling apart the Audi this weekend.
 

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Discussion Starter #26 (Edited)
Finally reached the point where we could tear into the Audi and remove the engine. It definitely wasn’t easy, but after 7-8 hours, we got it out. The key phrase of the day was, “****ing Audi...” followed by some head scratching. Luckily my buddy is pretty familiar with this engine in B5 S4s, but there was just enough different on the A6/Allroad platform that there were plenty of head scratching snags to tend with. I’m just glad this this was a Southern California car, and with the exception of some of the exhaust hardware, most everything came apart without too much hassle. That being said, I think the impact wrench saved us at least an hour when all was said and done. This is my first time doing anything this involved on a car that wasn’t old and American (therefore, extremely simple), so it was an awesome learning experience.

Anyway, onto the pictures! First, we had to reposition the car to get better access to the passenger side (need to remove the axles to clear the transmission later on). We threw on a set of B6 S4 18" wheels that my buddy had lying around to move it, and with the air suspension totally flat, the Allroad was properly slammed to the ground:


Front bumper off:


Front carrier off next, A/C fan and condenser intact to save for later without having to recharge the system:


Took off one of the covers and found part of the shredded timing belt:


I pretty much forgot to take any pictures whatsoever for the next 2 hours or so when it came time to remove the connections to the ECU. It turns out on the A6/Allroads, Audi put an anti-tampering case on it, meaning we would either have to drill out the bolts or cut the cover on the harness to get it off. We didn’t bother with either, and just decided to pull the ECU out with the engine intact for the time being:



I’ll have to drill those out at another time, but we just wanted to get the engine out. With the axles out and everything else seemingly ready, we hooked up the hoist:


And after messing around with getting the AC compressor and lines out intact, disconnecting the shifter linkage and finding a few things here and there that we forgot to unhook (like draining and disconnecting the power steering lines, and one ****ing ground strap that was holding us back that took forever to find), the engine finally came out:


This motor mount had completely let go, despite being unbolted from underneath, which was pretty funny. 165k miles will do that, I suppose:


And there we have it:


Continued...
 

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Discussion Starter #27
And the colossal mess to clean up after the fact:


Other misc. shots of parts and things to save:




This coming week we’ll be swapping all the parts needed from the old engine to the new, mating up the transmission, and if everything goes to plan, dropping the new motor in by the weekend. Fingers crossed we don’t run into too many snags that will prevent me from having it running this time next week (not likely)!
 

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Discussion Starter #30 (Edited)

This is what turbos look like when you go offroading in sand and clay. Now you know. Anyway, got the new turbos bolted up, and man was it a pain in the ass. Audi really knows how to make life miserable with their incredibly tight packaging.



Just look at this mess:


Unfortunately I didn’t take any better pictures than that, these were mostly for reference, and updating here was an afterthought. As you can see in the last picture, one of the bolts holing on that turbo isn’t correct, that’s a triple square bolt for the axle just there temporarily due to one of the bolts from the old turbos being effectively welded to the manifold, and broke an allen bit trying to get it out. So I’m just ordering a new bolt.

I did remember to take a picture of the bumper, though, to show how shredded this thing is:



Yeah... it’s lived a hard life. There may be a custom fabbed solution in the future for the bumper, but for now it’s still intact, so she’ll have to do.

Next steps are to scavenge a few more miscellaneous parts from the old engine, then pull off the transmission, take the new engine off the stand to do the clutch/flywheel, mate up the transmission, swap the ECU and full harness from the old engine, cry for a while at all my time spent on this thing, and then it will be time to drop the engine in the car!

Edit: Oh yeah, and the axles came. They look pretty damn high quality for only being $115. Still keeping the OEM ones as spares, so we’ll see how they hold up off road.

 

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Discussion Starter #31
I thought swapping the wiring harness and ECU would be more of a *****, but it actually wasn’t too bad. We had to swap it because the wiring for the Allroad had some differences from the S4 harness, and I didn’t want to find out that I needed to swap it over later when everything was hooked up in the car. Better safe than sorry.


It’s too bad, because the harness on the S4 was in a bit better shape. Oh well.

S4 harness off:


A rare look at this engine with all the wiring removed (looks so nice and clean):


And then Poof! Like magic, the harness appears:


Since the S4 engine doesn’t have the secondary air injection, and we found out that the auxiliary coolant pump was deleted (more hassle than it’s worth, so when they start to leak, people just rip them out and bypass them), I’ll need to cap off some connections, and then get a tune to exclude the SAI, otherwise it throws a code.

Also swapped over a few last needed things from the old engine like one of the cam position sensors, a coolant temp sensor, and what ever else. Next step is to disconnect the trans from the old engine and mate it up to the new one, and then it will be ready to drop in this weekend!

If all goes well, the Expedition Allroad will be running by Sunday. We’ll see!
 

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My hat off to you. I'm watching this build. This is so complex for an expedition rig I can't imagine fixing anything outside a shop. I know I had a '99 A4 with a PES supercharger.

Good luck and can't wait to see you on the dirt!
 

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Discussion Starter #34
After about 9-10 hours of work, the engine is in. It’s not really hooked up to much, but it’s on its own mounts, so I’m counting it. Man this thing is a tight fit...

Started off taking the last few things we needed from the other engine and getting everything ready. Cleaned up the timing belt covers, which ended up being a mix between ones from both the new and the old engine (they’re kinda brittle), threw on the rest of the accessory belt pulleys, and then cleaned and hooked up the inlet pipes.


Then separated the transmission from the old engine, which was a pain in the ass:



Still had the OEM stamped clutch at 165k miles. Not too shabby. Luckily the transmission is light enough to move by hand with two people, so we set it aside to change the slave cylinder (the boot had disintegrated on mine, luckily my buddy had a spare), the throwout bearing, and lubed up the engagement fork:


Hey, another nice shot of the old, shredded timing belt:


New clutch and flywheel on:


After transferring the old engine off to its new home on a few blocks in the back of the garage and mounting the new engine on the hoist, came the extreme hassle of mating the new engine to the transmission. This took at least an hour in itself, with some careful maneuvering of two floor jacks and many, many expletives:


Luckily we remembered the bell housing spacer, which I probably wouldn’t have even noticed on the old engine if my buddy hadn’t pointed it out and told of some horror stories of his friends who forgot it before. No thanks, I only want to do this once.

After that we hooked up the downpipes, O2 sensors, crank position sensor, vehicle speed sensor, and everything else that I’m forgetting:


We also took a little bit of time to get the harness sorted out and made sure all the mess of cables was routed somewhat correctly for when we attach everything to the firewall, as rerouting these things when the engine is in is a much bigger pain in the ass than when its out.

Time to drop the new engine in! People always say it like that, like it’s as simple as just setting in, but it’s a fucking pain. It was probably in the mid 50° range in an open carport, and I was still sweating by the end of it. No wonder you have to pull the engine for every little service...



And that is how we left it. Now we just need to hook everything up, which is just way too much crap to list, and will probably be another day in itself, but we should probably have it running by next weekend, barring any big road blocks. Fingers crossed.
 

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I'm pretty excited to see this on pirate. I've been an Audi tech for a while. I've done just about everything you can do to these over the years. They really aren't that bad once you get used to them. Also, reliability can be very good if you fix the few troublesome features of the 2.7. I've actually adapted the 2.7 to a GM transmission to put in my jeep (and whatever else I decide to shove it in). to say I'm obsessed with that 2.7 is a bit of an understatement. I'll be following this thread. I'll be in the hunt for a new daily soon and have yet to own an allroad, though I've owned no less than 20 other Audi's. Maybe this will nudge me to do the same!
 

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Also, there is zero comparison to an outback and this. This is way more comfortable, more power/torque, more interior space, better build quality etc.
 

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Discussion Starter #37
I'm pretty excited to see this on pirate. I've been an Audi tech for a while. I've done just about everything you can do to these over the years. They really aren't that bad once you get used to them. Also, reliability can be very good if you fix the few troublesome features of the 2.7. I've actually adapted the 2.7 to a GM transmission to put in my jeep (and whatever else I decide to shove it in). to say I'm obsessed with that 2.7 is a bit of an understatement. I'll be following this thread. I'll be in the hunt for a new daily soon and have yet to own an allroad, though I've owned no less than 20 other Audi's. Maybe this will nudge me to do the same!
Thanks man!

Dude, you put a 2.7 in a Jeep? Have build thread on that? I would love to see that!
 

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Discussion Starter #38
After bringing it home three months ago (almost to the day), the Expedition Allroad is moving under its own power, and it (mostly) does so quite well.


After setting the engine in last weekend, we still needed to do quite a bit. We through on the new axles, both intercoolers, charge pipes, accessory belt and fan, hooked up all the coolant lines, the clutch line and bled the clutch, the Y-pipe up top, the airbox, routed all the vacuum lines as needed, added fluids, etc.

New axles in and looking nice and pertty:


Since we had to use the timing belt covers from the S4 engine (the Allroad ones broke apart when the timing belt shredded), the grommets and bolt holes for the charge pipes didn’t line up. They sit slightly lower on the S4 motor, so instead of forcing them down and potentially cut themselves up on the frame rails, we just let them sit how they wanted to. They’re pretty secure there, so I don’t foresee any issues.

You can see the tabs on the bottom of the charge pipes where they wanted to sit here:


This is what $100 in fluids looks like:


Once we got everything back together and ready to go, we left the ECU unhooked and cranked the motor over for about 10 seconds to get oil flowing everywhere that hasn’t received oil in a while, namely the turbos which have been out of a car for at least 8 years now (sitting oiled in a box). Then we hooked the ECU up and tried to fire it up.

After about 5 seconds of cranking, it fired right up, but quickly died. We figured we might have flooded it after cranking it without the ECU for so long, so we let it sit for about 15 minutes and cleaned up a bit. When we tried it again it fired up almost immediately, but again died out just as quick.

Here’s a quick video of that: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tLsdnhXq9V4&feature=youtu.be

So we went and checked, double checked, and then triple checked just about every connection we could think of and found nothing. We noticed a blinking light of a car with a little key, and figured that was the dreaded immobiliser light. I immediately thought this had something to do with the fact that I removed the cluster to work on it (never actually replaced the LCD), so we were googling around for solutions.

After reading through a few forum threads, I found one where a guy said he just replaced the battery in the key and it fired right up. We didn’t think it would work, but we decided to grab the spare key and try that. Sure enough, it fired right up and ran smooth.


It is making some sort of clicking noise from the very front, which we think is the mechanical fan, as it’s cracked in some places and visibly wobbly, but other than that it runs awesome. We took it around the neighborhood to test everything out, and it pulls as strong as 250hp should in a car that weighs just over two tons.



A few issues that need to be addressed:

  • That (possible) fan noise
  • The turn signal stalk has an issue that causes a very, very annoying noise (fairly common on these)
  • The tire rub is pretty bad on tight turns
  • The check engine light is on until I get a tune that will exclude the deleted SAI
Other than that, I’m just going to drive it for a while and get things sorted out before I even think of offroading it. I need to sort out the tire rub (probably some trimming and a larger spacer), and I NEED a good skid plate before doing anything off the pavement. The oil pan and filter are waaayy too vulnerable as they sit right now, completely unprotected.

More updates as they come...
 
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