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Discussion Starter #1
I just ordered an Aussie locker for my '84 toyota, and it fits either the front or the rear axle. I'm having trouble deciding where I want to put it (only have money for one for the time being, before you say both :flipoff2: ).

I originally was thinking rear because that's where most of the weight will be when climbing, and that's where toyota puts their factory lockers. But then I read this:

Aussie Locker website FAQ said:
A front installation will usually yield the greatest improvement in off-road capability. This is due to the general requirement of increased in traction under hill climbing or rock crawling. Under full climbing conditions, due to the angle of the vehicle, the rear wheels carry a much greater weight (weight transfer) and therefore, the front carries less weight and tends to break traction very easily.

Once one front wheel starts to spin the other wheel stops turning and the whole front diff ceases to provide traction. At this point the load is transferred to the rear diff as if the vehicle was a 2WD and due to the increased load the rear wheels tend to spin and the vehicle stops. If you can stop the front wheel from spinning you have solved the traction problem. In addition to the traction performance a front installation does not introduce any changes in handling characteristics.
...and that makes sense to me too. I also wouldn't mind not having the on-road characteristics changed. I also have a pretty decent rear suspension setup while the front is nearly stock, if that influences the decision.

Any personal experience or input on the matter?

Thanks.
 

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Rear Hands down.
 

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Put it in front and then weld the rear, Done
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
lol, I'm not welding the rear on a vehicle that has to go on 5 hour road trips to get to my camping spots.

I was initially thinking rear, too. Anyone have any ideas why aussie locker might think otherwise?

thanks again :)
 

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With the weight of the engine in the front you will get more traction when not climbing. I think the idea is that the front will pull you through stuff. I have am locked front and rear, but it is nice to have it in the rear because you can make it through spots without having to even put it in four wheel drive, and it doesn't effect steering like being locked in the front does.
 

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I'd go rear, although I have an Aussie in my front and a welded rear. If you're just going to lock one end for now, I think you get more bang for your buck in the rear. We welded my rear and I wheeled the heck out of it for a year or so before I got around to putting an Aussie in the front.
 

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My first locker went into my front axle (aussie was on back order when they first came out with the D35 locker) and the increased traction was awesome, but i definetly noticed the vehicle was that much more once it had a rear locker pushing it. Plus if you have a locked rear front open, you can still have really good road manners in the snow if you ever run into that. You won't be sorry with the rear first that i can promise you.
 

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Not to hijack but what about road manners in the snow with both f/r locked with an aussie. Or just front locked?
 

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I had an 82 Toyota Pickup that had just a front locker in it when I got it. After wheeling it for about a year I moved the locker to the rear, mainly because the steering sucked in 4 wheel drive without power steering. On flat ground for traction in soft stuff the locker worked better in the front. On hill climbs and rock crawling it was a little better in the rear. I would just leave it in the front and save up for one in the rear. No use doing twice the work by swapping it around especially if you can live with the steering like it is.
 

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With good tires, (Iroks, Trxus, BFG ATs) basically anything with alot of siping you probably won't even need 4x4 with a rear locker. Only reason i ever engaged mine was because i was running boggers in the snow one winter :eek: If you need 4x4 cause the snow is so deep, you won't be going fast enough to get into trouble anyways. Good Luck
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Not to hijack but what about road manners in the snow with both f/r locked with an aussie. Or just front locked?
They recommend strongly against installing one in the front if the car will be used on icey roads. Sounds kinda scary, but it only takes an hour or two to pull it out, so thats a job I'm willing to do 2x per year. As for the rear, I think if you just modify your driving style and don't try to put power down mid-corner, they handle alright on ice/snow. No first hand experience, just what I've read.



Anyway, thanks for all the input, guys. I think I'm going to put it in the rear for now, and if the road manner suck or if I'm not impressed by the improvement, I'll try the front and see how it goes.
 

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They recommend strongly against installing one in the front if the car will be used on icey roads. Sounds kinda scary, but it only takes an hour or two to pull it out, so thats a job I'm willing to do 2x per year. As for the rear, I think if you just modify your driving style and don't try to put power down mid-corner, they handle alright on ice/snow. No first hand experience, just what I've read.



Anyway, thanks for all the input, guys. I think I'm going to put it in the rear for now, and if the road manner suck or if I'm not impressed by the improvement, I'll try the front and see how it goes.
Don't even bother wasting your time. Its a common misconception that if you drive with locker you are gonna end up in a ditch. This is partially true. You cannot rat race around snowy corners with lockers like you can with a LS. Because you have more traction you have to pay attention to what the vehicle is doing. And as i said before, you probably won't need to engage your 4x4 anyways. When ever we go snow wheeling, we just head on down the snowy roads, none of the guys i wheel with use 4x4 on the road except for really deep snow, because we don't need it. You can use lockers if you want to, but if you feel it start to wander going around a corner, you have to have enough common sense to get off the gas and allow the vehicle to correct itself.

If you speak with anybody that does alot of snow wheeling, especially getting on the road to get to the trails, most of them will probably tell you the tractionl you have from lockers is not worth giving up for being able to powerslide thru a snowy corner. After having mine for a few winters, i would never give mine up, and ive never been in a ditch, crossing traffic lanes, blah blah blah, I deal with wonderful northeast winters, so i see ALOT of snow and ice, specially being by the coast. Good Luck
 

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Having had to drive a Plymouth with a spool for a winter, the cool thing about a spool is that you know exactly what it will do.
 

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Put it in the rear. You will want it more open in the front if your driving around on the street in the snow. I have herd of people leaving one hub unlocked when snow street driving but that seems like it would be hard on the locker. If your running stock birfs thats more reason to put it in the back.
 
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