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I'm trying to knock out a couple of my projects that have been put on hold due to temperature. I'm just about done with the body work and need to prime and paint, but it hasn't been above 60 for more than a few hours.


What would be a "safe" temp to spray a vehicle and how long would I need to keep it at that temp for drying? I am using a single stage paint if that matters.

I did call the company that sold me the paint and they said that the only "proper way" is to use a heated paint booth. Yes, I understand that is most ideal, but i don't have a heated paint booth handy:homer:
 

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When I paint one I like for it to be at least mid 60's or higher. I've painted in colder but it takes forever to flash and sometimes after your done, it looks good and you shut the lights off and come back the next day to find it ran into the floor. You also have problems with cohesion with cold metal.

Just heat your area up before hand with a torpedo .

Edit: Source, worked with my family flipping cars since I was a kid, worked off and on in a body shop the last 10 yrs.
 

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60* Is the minimum temperature you should spray a urethane. It has to stay above 50* for 24 hours after painting for the paint to finish right or it wont adhere correctly and it'll either flake or peel.
 

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I just painted a chassis in 10* weather here. Heated the garage to 60ish, heated up the chassis with a propane torch to warm and sprayed it.
It dripped and ran like a mofo. :homer:
You ran out of talent Sleestack. :flipoff2:

Get a can of Hammerite, cut it with xylene and spray that shit.
 

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Go with whatever the manufacturer of the paint says, while its not what you want to hear, it is probably correct.
I generally use Epoxy from SPI when I paint, they have a polar accelerator for cooler temperatures, it might be compatable with what you are using.
http://media.wix.com/ugd/8ced3e_aa7a0c28253d491895be7e6b57691ec6.pdf

They are awesome guys to work with, and are always willing to give advice no matter the manufacturer.
 

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When I paint one I like for it to be at least mid 60's or higher. I've painted in colder but it takes forever to flash and sometimes after your done, it looks good and you shut the lights off and come back the next day to find it ran into the floor. You also have problems with cohesion with cold metal.

Just heat your area up before hand with a torpedo .

Edit: Source, worked with my family flipping cars since I was a kid, worked off and on in a body shop the last 10 yrs.
This. I don't think you can get reducer for lower than the 60s...
 

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Cross linking basically stops below sixty degrees. So, two component products will not cure without the proper temperature.

When it comes to paint drying, time, air movement, and heat are your friends. Or enemies. Control all three and you will master your paint job.
 
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