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Discussion Starter #1
I just got my new master cyclinder in for my 74 fj40's brakes and was wondering if I need to bleed it before I put it on the cruiser? or can I just slap it on and bleed the brakes like normal? I need a step by step description on how to do this.
thanks guys
Donald <IMG SRC="smilies/usa.gif" border="0"> <IMG SRC="smilies/beer.gif" border="0">
 

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What I did is just put it on without the brake lines on. I then took two rubber tubes coming out of where the brakes lines should go and then fill both resoviors and pump a couple times.
 

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you need to run the tubes back up into the cylinder ( create a closed loop ) and pump the master piston , but not push it in all the way , just almost all the way. This will get rid of all the air in the cylinders. I use a couple of old ( clean ) hard brake lines for the loop.
May the brake gods shine on you!! <IMG SRC="smilies/beer.gif" border="0"> <IMG SRC="smilies/usa.gif" border="0">
 

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Discussion Starter #4
so I can't just bleed the air out the lines like normal huh? the master cylinder needs to be done individually?

Donald
 

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yea you need to bleed the cylinder. The brakes will be mushy if air is left in the cylinder. Its simple to do , clamp the cylinder in a vise , buy a five dollar brake line , cut it in two , bend it and pump the cylinder. Dont skip this step or you will be pulling the cylinder and doing it anyway after you have bled all the lines and found shitty line pressure! <IMG SRC="smilies/beer.gif" border="0"> <IMG SRC="smilies/beer.gif" border="0"> <IMG SRC="smilies/usa.gif" border="0">
 

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I never heard of "bench bleeding" a master cylinder until I started hanging out with Land Cruiser people. For the entire 4 years that I was making a living turning wrenches, we just slapped the MC on and bled it out the wheel cylinders and were done with it. That must be a total of several dozen master cylinders without a bleeding problem. I noticed that the Toyota manual doesn't mention it, so it can't be a Land Cruiser-specific procedure.
 

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Anytime you put a new master cylinder on you must Bench Blled it before installation. If this is not accomplished you will never get out all of the air in the lines.
Put your master cylinder in a vice, if your new M/C didn't come with a bleeder kit, go to the parts store and get one. They are very inexpensive. Hook up the lines, one to each port, and loop them into the reserviors. Fill up the reservoirs with clean brake fluid. Make sure the bleeder hoses are submerged in the brake fluid.
Next, slowly push in the M/C plunger with a large phillips screwdriver all the way in, then slowly let it ride back. Watch the bubbles in the reservoirs. Keep repeating this process until you see no more bubbles.
Now you can carefully remove the M/C from your vice and install it it your cruiser. Don't sweat it too much when you remove the bleeder lines and some fluid leaks out, just work as fast as you can to get the lines hooked up so your reservoirs don't drain out. If that happens, guess what, yep, you got to bench bleed the M/C again.
Once everything is installed, lines are connected and your fluid level in your reservoirs are good, you must now bleed your brakes. Makes sure you start with the farthest wheel from your M/C, usually the right rear. This process is easier to do with two people and achieves the best results. One person in the truck pumping the brakes, and the other cracking open the bleeder screws. Good luck, if you have anymore questions feel free to ask away!
 

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That's way cool , Morgan ! Now you've got a set of bleeders in the tool box. I bet you could market those babies.
Somtimes it's the simplest of things that often show off creative genious.
 

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a picture is worth a thousand words!
Morgans got it right!
Pick up any manual and they will always tell you to bleeed the master.
Like Nike says " Just do it !" <IMG SRC="smilies/bounce.gif" border="0"> <IMG SRC="smilies/bounce2.gif" border="0">
 

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I have always bled (bench) on the truck w/o lines hooked in. I have caught the expressed fluid but never ran it back into the reservoirs. Interesting idea, but I have never had problems on 4-5 LC MC's or the rotten F-250 I owned. Did I say I hated Ford products before???????
 
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The only thing bench bleeding does is give immediate pedal pressure. Once you remove the brakeline at the master, you have air in the line at that location. To remove that airbubble all the fluid between the master and wheel cylinder has to be cycled out, or bleed. Bench bleeding just makes a smaller bubble. It use to be done with the master on the vehicle by cracking the brake line at the master, using the fillting as the bleeder.
 

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I did EXACTLY what Morgan did for a buddies FJ-80 - The bends are in a different direction, but identical down to the green fittings.

I thing it was a 20" metric line, cut in half and bent to suit.

ON an ABS equipped vehicle, if you don't bench bleed, you will have a heck of a time getting the air out....
 

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Discussion Starter #14
alright cool ideas guys thanks for the advice

Donald <IMG SRC="smilies/beer.gif" border="0"> <IMG SRC="smilies/usa.gif" border="0">
 
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