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Discussion Starter #21 (Edited)
Seems like on a willys rubber might be more desirable? Poly transmits more bumps and vibrations, right? Or is there some other benefit? I always thought that rubber rides better, but doesn't last as long. And poly transmits more vibrations, but lasts longer and has less give. (better for performance cars)
 

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I'm using metal bushings in my spring eyes, rides nice with minimal vibes. It could be something about the 35" Krawler about a foot from my head but overall its WAY better than I though it was going to be....
 

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Discussion Starter #23
I got the wedges installed on my willys, but it's not enough to prevent the driveshaft from binding at full droop, so I have a driveshaft on order from Tom Wood, with a double CV joint at the transfer case. I'm positive that will take care of the drive-line issues :)

Had to cut the skid plate ("skid plate" only 1/8" thick, haha!) for the transfer case & transmission, to fit the new front driveshaft angle. was quite easy :)

Here's the little beast, my daily driver :-D









 

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Are you rotating the rear diff more again for the CV driveshaft? Zero axle u-joint angle and all that with a cv?
 

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Discussion Starter #25
It's pretty close to zero angle at the axle side (if that's what you are asking?)
 

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yup. How close is pretty close? It will rotate up a bit under power, but CVs tend to be a little longer to the 'pivot' and you may add a little angle with the new driveshaft.
 

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Discussion Starter #27 (Edited)
I just picked up a digital angle finder a few weeks ago, I'll see what the difference in angle is :)

How critical is it to get the zero angle at the differential side?
 

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Discussion Starter #28 (Edited)
Oh yes, and one other thing, I found that might be a problem?

With the wedges in place, the centering pin on the springs no longer protrude into spring perches on the axle.

I assume that this is not good, since one rear tire could be slightly farther forward or back than the other side?

What can be done about this?
 

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Found you here also Daniel. When you get your new driveshaft, the Best way is to get rid of the wedges, cut off the old spring pads, and either reweld them back on, or buy new springs pads. There really inexpensive. That way you can get your pinion angle just right. Not sure if you weld or not Daniel, but even if you have to pay someone, it shouldn't cost that much. Did this 6 months ago, and haven't any problems. Jeep is looking great, and so cool to see it's your daily driver.
 

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Oh yes, and one other thing, I found that might be a problem?

With the wedges in place, the centering pin on the springs no longer protrude into spring perches on the axle.

I assume that this is not good, since one rear tire could be slightly farther forward or back than the other side?

What can be done about this?
You are basically suppose to install the wedge onto the spring pack with the centering pin installed through the wedge. Careful when doing this on a SUA since the wedge if on the inside of the arch and can be snapped if you tighten down the centering pin too much with too long a wedge.

The wedge only needs to be as long as the spring pad.
 

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Discussion Starter #31
yea, I'm thinking that might be the solution, new spring perches.

I do weld, but I only have 110 volt at home (mig), 110 volt probably might not penetrate enough, I could at least tack it into place and bring the axle somewhere that has 220v, and finish it off there.
 

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Given that most of my friends built most of their jeeps with a 110 (including frames and all critical suspension bits) I would think the 110 is enough if done right. But I do have a story. A friend of mine finished off the re-build of the big-block in his firebird. I don't know how much power it had but he claimed it had gotten into the 10's before the rebuild and was making more power afterwards. Well, he was out flogging it and the spring pads/welds broke lose from the axle. The pinion rotated up, and swung the driveshaft around under there like a one bladed helicopter. Man what a mess. :laughing: He said it made a hell of a lot of noise when it let go.
 

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Discussion Starter #33
I'll give it a try with 110 then :) And maybe double/triple pass it just to be safe :)
 

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I would be one of those friends with a 110V built vehicle. EVERYTHING on my recent rebuild was done with a 135amp machine. I didn't use anything much thicker than about 1/8" material in the build, tried to properly design things, and have not had any issues with some pretty heavy use.....
 

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I'll give it a try with 110 then :) And maybe double/triple pass it just to be safe :)
Prep the metal properly, minimize any gap, heavily tack things so they don't move, and then lay a proper bead at 120-140 amps and you will be fine. Also, when in doubt move the part to a good angle for welding, don't try and contort yourself into a difficult position where you have an exotic welding position.
 

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Discussion Starter #36
yea I would have it turned up to 140 for sure, as high as I can go on 110, for metal that thick.
 

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Also, if you can, weld around the 'ends' of the spring perch where it meets the axle tube. This will help with the strength of the end of the welded joint
 

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Discussion Starter #38 (Edited)
yea, the perches that I have ordered leave acess to the inside a bit, so I could probably get at least 1/2" of weld run on the insides of each end, (maybe more, depending on how far I can get the gun in there) that would certainly help :)

Guess I'm just a bit nervous, I've never done anything structural thicker than 1/8" with 110, everything thicker I've brought all my stuff to a friends place and used 220. Bringing an entire rear end though, would be difficult, as I have no truck! I suppose I could throw it in the back of the jeep if I'm not confident enough to do it with 110.

How thick are the walls of the axle tubes, in a factory Dana 41? The spring perches look like they are 1/4" (the ones I ordered, I mean) It might help to grind a bevel on them, eh?
 

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Just get the axle in the position you want it, bolt everything up and then tack the perches on so they don't move. Unbolt the axle and wheel it out grime under the jeep to finish weld the perches on a high amp setting. Weld about 3/4" in one spot then move around so you don't take a chance on warping the housing.

Then paint and bolt everything back in place.

I like you DD by the way
 

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Discussion Starter #40
new driveshaft and spring perches! In hind site, now that the angle is corrected, I might have not needed the double joint driveshaft, at least for street driving anyway. But with the angle almost corrected (with the wedges, before) it was binding at full droop.

Not the best welds on the spring perches, but I think they will hold :)


















 
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