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Discussion Starter #1
Hello,
I've been going through many old threads on three and four link suspensions, and it seems to me that most people here use heims, or a combination of heims and bushings. It would seem to me that bushings are not as forgiving as heims when it comes to non-radial loading. Those of you running bushings on both sides of the links, how durable are they? Would you recommend using them?
Thanks,
Mikel
 

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On my last rig I had three links front and rear with bushings(44044) and they shreadded in short order.Bought them by the case and replaced them every couple runs.This was under very abusive conditions(UROC,Calroc,Idiot driver) the geometry was pretty good(proper loading of the bushing) but they would still split apart and shread.HTH
 

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Guy in my club runs energy suspension bushings on every end of his rear 4-link just cuz it's cheap as hell. They're all worn now but he's been wheelin Tellico on a regular basis (at least 1-2 times a month) for a year and still on the same bushings. BTW, his rig has Dana 60s and 40 TSLs in case that matters.
 

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I'm running spherical joints on one end & OEM style bushings on the other on my new links. I wanted the shock absorption qualities of the rubber on at least one end. I only have a couple of runs on them at this point but so far so good. :D
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thank you. Anyone else?
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Interesting... What size bushings are those? I'm assuming that large diameter and narrow bushing will do much better dealing with sideways twisting... Also, the longer the arms, the less they need to "twist" in order to achieve the same articulation, so that probably helps extend the bushing's life.
Thanks.
Mikel
 

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Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
Deviljeep, are you getting much flex-steer with that setup? It's hard to see from that pic.
Thanks,
Mikel
 

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With his lowers being parallel with the frame (viewed from above the rig), his roll axis is the same as the slope (viewed from the side) of his lowers.
 

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The links were built to twist.....no "twisting" pressure on the bushings!!


When it gets flexed out it looks to have a little "flex-steer".....just something he has to learn to wheel with...

I'll try to dig up some more pics..
 

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I run XJ Lower bushings on both ends with Sunray Engineering "Twisty's" in the middle.

The Twisty's are machined pieces with a Bolt and O-Rings to keep the gease in and to keep the whole unit quiet. They have 360* rotation ability and 2-3" of adjustability.

Minimal rear steer.

Also, I think the rubber ends on the links are more forgiving to sharp blows versus having stiff hiems on each end that have no give in them.
 

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i used 1 1/4" all thread and tall nuts to keep my bushings from twisting, the grade 2 lasted about a year (lower arms) and i replaced it with B7
 

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Discussion Starter #16
How would radius arm bushings like these work in a suspension link? (photo lifted from the "One link suspension" thread)

 

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I ran ORD's BA200 bushings at both ends of all my rear links, with not twisty mechanism, for several years. It works fine in my rig that weighs 6000 lbs trail ready. I never had to replace a single bushing, but I did replace 2 or 3 just because I had the links out for one reason or another and had found mild damage to the flanges.

Im not going around telling everyone to do their suspensions this way, but I sure wont discourage anyone from trying it for their application. I just cant make myself spend 1000 dollars on heims, tube adapters, and misalignment spacers. (I would if I could justify it, because I think they would ultimately perform better overall)

Edit: Sorry for the poser pic, but it shows that the bushings allow plenty of movement. This pic shows the suspension with bushings at both ends of the links (no twisting mechanism of any kind), the springs retained at both ends, and the shocks being the limiting factor.
 

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bgreen said:
I ran ORD's BA200 bushings at both ends of all my rear links, with not twisty mechanism, for several years. It works fine in my rig that weighs 6000 lbs trail ready. I never had to replace a single bushing, but I did replace 2 or 3 just because I had the links out for one reason or another and had found mild damage to the flanges.

Im not going around telling everyone to do their suspensions this way, but I sure wont discourage anyone from trying it for their application. I just cant make myself spend 1000 dollars on heims, tube adapters, and misalignment spacers. (I would if I could justify it, because I think they would ultimately perform better overall)

Edit: Sorry for the poser pic, but it shows that the bushings allow plenty of movement. This pic shows the suspension with bushings at both ends of the links (no twisting mechanism of any kind), the springs retained at both ends, and the shocks being the limiting factor.
I was gonna tell you your tires suck.. But then I saw you live in Alaska.. That makes your rig badass.
 

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If I lived in AZ is sure as hell would not have these tires... Hell, I wouldnt even have this rig. Both of them would be worthless.
 

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my rig has bushings on both ends, been around for almost 4 years, the only problem is the damage they will cause to the surounding areas of your attachment points. without being able to flex the areas around them start to flex, which over time starts to fatigue the metal and cause cracks, my advise is to use some type of flexy or heim on one end and save some headaches down the road.
 
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