Pirate 4x4 banner

1 - 20 of 24 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,098 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I bought a Ryobi 10" compond/miter chop saw for cutting 2x4 wood. I bought some metal cutting wheels for it. The question is will i have any problems cutting 1/4" steel box tubing with it? It's not like a 14" Dewalt, but it should do the job right? Besides melting some of the plastic on it:D

BTW: let me know if this should be moved to the Newbie4x4 section
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
244 Posts
How much are you planning on cutting? That's a pretty small saw to be cutting a lot of metal with.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,098 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Just some box tubing to make a track bar mount and some misc stuff.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,868 Posts
the only difference is in the rpms. a metal cutting anything has more rpms. it has to be abrasive and in order for it to be abrasive enough, it has to be fast. your woodcutting saw may do fine because they sometimes have a wide range of speeds, but it could take a while and it could make the steel very hot by sitting on it too long and that could cause it to be brittle and/or hard to weld because it will harden the metal on both sides of the cuts if it takes too long.

:smokin:
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
25,817 Posts
If it has plastic guards on it your screwed. They will catch fire. I use an old skill saw my dad gave me that's all metal. Put a cutoff blade in it and I cut sheet steel with it. I have a chop saw but the skill saw has it's uses and works fine. I have used 10-12 blades with it, no problems.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
320 Posts
I did the same thing with my wood cutting Dewalt chop saw for a while. Cooked about ever plastic part on it. Eventually ended up burning out the motor as well. I'd say get yourself something thats made for metal.

-Rob
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
216 Posts
Like Rodeorob said It will work. I used mine for a few months untile I finaly broke down and bought a metal one and now all the plastic parts on my wood chopsaw are melted and discolored.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,089 Posts
how about a 10 inch CHOP SAW from Ryobi?? I put the chop saw in caps b/c, i thought that there was a difference between chop saw and miter saw...i thought chop saw was used for metal and miter saw was used for wood? anyway i just bought a 10 inch ryobi chop saw that came with the abrasive/grinding wheel (the black wheel :D )...i should be good for 3/16 and 1/4 inch square channel right???
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,620 Posts
You people are all stoned.

A wood mitre saw turns much faster than an abrasive metal chop saw. metal~3000+rpm

wood 5000+rpm

Use a metal abrasive blade in a wood saw is unbelievably stupid and dangerous - the glue-and-resin-stuck-together abrasive wheel can and will shatter at thos speeds.....then lookout !!

Don't do it
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
518 Posts
I heard that metal chop saws have hardend gears to, that wood miter saws dont. dunno if it tru for all saws though.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,513 Posts
OOP'S said:
What ever you do not by the Harbor Freight brand, they are a POS!!!!:D
The $50 14" saw is worth it if you live close enough to a harbor freight store so its not that big of a PITA. I've returned 3 so far but I have replacements for a year and the store is like 20 mins away.:D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,660 Posts
I used a Delta 10" miter saw for about 3 years cutting mostly metal with no troubles at all. As far as the cutting wheels falling apart,thats crazy. In three years it happened one time but it was my fault cuz I moved my hand and the blade got in a bind. Nothing happed though cuz like mine and every miter saw I have ever seen they have a huge blade guard and you can't hardly even see the blade. One thing a miter saw is handy for is an exo cage cuz you can cut some pretty crazy angle cut's.

I went out and bought a 14" chop saw simply to have a bigger and better saw for the job. I took my miter saw apart to clean all the metal shavings out and one gear looked a little wore and is probly from cutting metal. That gear is onlt 25 bucks so it's no big deal to me. As much as I have used the miter in 3 years it's definitly paid for itself and has held up well.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
551 Posts
I agree with Billa Vista,Metal chop saws were designed to run at certain RPM for abrasive wheels.Buy the right tool for the job!I bought 14" Milwaukee.....wasn't cheap but I dont have to exchange it after each use.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,620 Posts
As far as the cutting wheels falling apart,thats crazy
Just because you get away with something doesn;t mean it's safe or smart.

You guys that post this kind of crap.....I have to ask:

1) Do you feel any sense of responsibility for the "advice" you give?

2) In this particular case - do you have a theory to explain your view? I mean, if it is as you suggest, that is - fine from a durability, functionality, and safety point of view - why is then that the people who design and manufacture the tools make them differently like that? Surely you have an explanation? Do you know something the rest of us don't? If so - please do share.....and I mean more that just saying "I dun it and it wuz ok".....that's just saying "I didn;t actually think it through, and was lucky, so I must be smarter"

Me - I still say right tool - right job. Though I do agree the angle-ability of a compund mitre saw would be VERY coll. BUt - then I ask myself - why is then, that NO-ONE makes a metal cutting compound mitre saw? Could it be that the compound angles combined with the nature of the blades and the rpm required would make for an unsafe product...at least in anything approaching a reasonable cost? Hmmmmm?? If we think the answer even *might* ne YES, then waht does that say about the guy sticking a 3000 rpm abrasive wheel in a 6000 rpm wood saw??

Look - we all do stuff that's outside some "limits" or "designs"....I'm just suggesting cutting steel at several thousane rpm isn;t a good place to do that.

Or you can listen to the other guy.....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
310 Posts
I've got a worn out hf special and just recently put a cast off Makita metal cutting blade (steel w/ carbide teeth) on it. Now it cuts with out trouble and doesn't leave behind dust , just tiny metal chips which are much easier to clean up. Yah,I know the safety implications and figure that the hf special spins about the right rpm now(it is 11 years old), so don't give me any lectures.
I'm BOMB'd and am my own warranty station.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
216 Posts
Sh*t I guess I must be an idiot for doing something so stupid
What was I thinking?
Thanks for setting me straight Billavista.


What a load of crap not everybody on this board can afford the right tool for the right job, a hammer was designed by "professionals" to pound nails so if you use it for anything else I guess you must be an idiot.
One reason they don't make a metal mitre saw is because an abrasive blade gets smaller as you cut and you need a moveable fence the keep up with the blade.
As for the speed I thought you might have had something there until I went out and check my Mikita mitre saw and the no load speed is 4600 rpm's so then I checked an old 10 in abrasive blade and the max rpm for that blade was 4500 rpm. So I guess your right I am an idiot thats 100 RPM over the blades safe limit.

How could I have been so careless?

:flipoff2: :flipoff2:
 
1 - 20 of 24 Posts
Top