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Been lurking awhile, learning a lot, applying a little, hoping to do more. This weekend I mounted a CS-130 Alternator, and installed a GM Ignition Module. Works Fine EXCEPT, I can not get my Tachometer to work. I made the connections as directed, with the "B" terminal connected to a switched Ignition source from the original wiring harness, and the "C" terminal connected to the "-" terminal on the coil. The "W" and "G" terminals are connected to the two wires from the distributor that just happened to be red and white, and white just happened to work on the "W" terminal. Lucky me, I like things color coded. For the "B" terminal I used the red wire from the original wiring harness, but I did nothing with the original yellow-white stripped wire that my Hayes manual's wiring diagram identified as the tachometer wire. With the tachometer disconnected, all works fine, but any attempt to connect it to the "-" terminal of the coil kills the engine. I tried using a 1K resistor, and the motor did not die, but the tachometer still does nothing. Any idea of where the tachometer lead should go? The truck is a 1980 with a 20R motor.

The module is a four lead module listed for a 1985 truck, NAPA #TP45SB. Some of the later Chevy's ran a five blade module and I was just wondering if the extra blade on those was for a tachometer lead. Anybody ever try this??

I included some pics of my install. Notice the old computer chip (AMD) cooler fins that I drilled and modified to accept the module, and using another screw I was able to mount the fins in the same place as the original Toyota module right on top of the coil bracket. And I did use some heat sink compound between the module and the fins.


 

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BTW, the above is my first time posting. Like I said, been lurking and learning, but this is the first time I ran into something I just can't figure out on my own.
 

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Stupid ME! I found the problem.



Turns out the yellow-white stripped wire doesn't go to the tach, and I don't really know what it goes to yet, but I found this little black wire, the bottom wire under my little finger in the photo, which I had overlooked. Hooked it up to the (-) terminal on the coil, and TA-DA, the tachometer works.

I decided to make a little bracket to hold down my heat sink. There is one screw running through it already, mounting it to the strap on top of the coil, but the heat sink was a little short to be able to run another screw through the other side. So I bent a piece of scrap aluminum, drilled it out, and ran two screws through it to secure the other side of the heat sink to the coil strap.


 

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Put a self tapper in the bracket you made so it doesn't slip off the fins. That is pretty trick! :smokin:
 

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I don't think it will slip now. Notice the yellow arrow in the other picture. That screw runs all the way through the heat sink and into the coil bracket to hold the heat sink in place. I just put the bracket on there to stabilize it and keep it from spinning around on the other screw. The screws running through the module and into the heat sink have self locking nylon nuts on the bottom too. They are all 8X32 and 10x24 machine screws because as an electrician, I have lots of those lying around. I used a 6-in-1 tap tool to re-tap the metric threads in the coil bracket because I was too cheap to run up to the hardware store and buy metric machine screws.
 

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1k ohm resistor

I read this whole post and it still seems a little unclear to me. If using the Toyota coil, there should be a 1k ohm resistor attached to the yellow wire as in initial pics, correct? The most recent pic isn't clear enough to tell whether he used one or not... When I look at the original toyota icm there IS a 1k ohm resistor present...

And some ppl question about the grease for heat transfer.... the supplied grease with the icm (or hei - high energy ignition - since some referred to it as this) is a heat transfer grease (not dielectric). I'm currently trying to mount that chev icm in the toyota ingniter/icm/hei box... :D
 

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good for you!

My last Toyota ignition module lasted 300,00 miles.
When I drove GM trucks, I didn't go anywhere without a spare ignition moule in the glove box beacuse they failed so often. I'll spend the money on a Toyota one. JMO[/QUOTE


glad you've had such good luck, clearly you don't need to be here reading this thread. :shaking:
 

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My last Toyota ignition module lasted 300,00 miles.
When I drove GM trucks, I didn't go anywhere without a spare ignition moule in the glove box beacuse they failed so often. I'll spend the money on a Toyota one. JMO

glad you've had such good luck, clearly you don't need to be here reading this thread. :shaking:
way to tell him


too bad youre 8 years late :laughing:
 

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I don't know what the hell is wrong with my truck! Damnit! I went home and did this setup and nothing, it's still not firing! WTF! Maybe the distributor is bad? Is there any way to set a toyota up completely like a gm HEI system where all you need is 2wires to the starter, 1wire to the distributor and one wire to the alt?
 

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spark comes from coil
it's used cause $$
stock igniter $350+
gm $15-30
Different modules have different dwell characteristics too so running a factory module will be different from an msd or accel unit. The coil provides the pop the module tells it how long to do it.

I just did this swap after the 6AL on my dd puked and my backup stock system had a bad ignitor I dug up this thread and swapped in a gm module. Apparently the 6AL has been on its way out for awhile because the truck will rev to 6k now where it would peter out about 4800 rpm before.
 

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Hi All! First time on the Pirate, and I need a little help.
Suffered the dreaded dead ignition module wilst driving home.
(Right outside my driveway. Lucky me.) In my 1979 Toyota pickup.
Bought the GM module, hooked it all up - nothing. Bought a new pickup,
installed it - nothing. Air gapped it to .0010 (.25 mm) and she started
right up. Runs great above 1500 rpm, but below that she dies when cold, almost dies when warm, but then comes back and idles perfect.
Checked the timing - spot on. Changed the rotor - waiting for a cap.
Any ideas? Help me Obi Wan Kenobi - your my only hope.
 

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So I did a little checking with my trusty volt meter, and found
that while idleing the voltage at 'B' was around 13.4 as soon as I
revved the motor the voltage dropped dramatically to around 8.5 and
picked up to around 10 at 3000, then on the decel the volt would start
dropping until around 1200 they dropped below 7 and the engine cut out, but then came back to idle and the volts back up 13.4 or so.

I'm still using the stock toyota lead for the dist/ig module. should I run a new
wire from somewhere to the 'b'? And where would that somewhere be?
Thanks!
 

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I did this conversion on my toy about 6 months ago. The only problem i ran into was the stock gm coil went out because it didn't have a resistor. So i put an Accell Coil in and it was worked great ever sense. Its still better than the two setup. Has anyone else who has done this ran into a coil issue?
 

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Fixed it! Thanks Guys! Ran a wire from the 'Engine' fuse to the coil/module'works like a charm! Thanks for all your help!
 
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