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Discussion Starter #1
I have an '80 pickup with 35" tires. It has Downey 2" lift springs (probably less now - they're old) and some lift shackles. I'm not sure how much lift they add but they are 6.5" between bolt centers. There is about 5" clearance between the stock bump stops and the frame (without me sitting it it). I also have a 2" body lift.
Bending my tie rod on rocks is getting old and I'm contemplating going to a high steer system.
Is it feasible to go to high steer without too much work? I don't want to limit my up travel. I'm open to moving my axle forward a little, I think my front drive line has enough travel but I'd have to check to make sure.
What would be the simplest way to go to a high steer system?
Thanks
 

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To quote an old flamefest...
Sirch!:flipoff2:

Now is a good time to ask how to fit 4d'z also!:homer:
 

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Discussion Starter #3
To quote an old flamefest...
Sirch!:flipoff2:

Now is a good time to ask how to fit 4d'z also!:homer:
I did do a search, and found a lot of good information. But many of the threads were older and conflicting, and I didn't find my particular situation. So I thought I'd get some current opinions.
And what is 4d'z?
 

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The most crucial part of hy-steer is proper positioning of the box. I recommend going to an aftermarket pitman arm to get the position dialed in. Try to get the box as far forward as possible, especially with RUF and big rubber
 

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What would be the simplest way to go to a high steer system?
Thanks
Buy highsteer. Install. Add junkyard leaf springs untill you are happy. Realize that body lifts are :rainbow: without a reason. Remove. Feel good about yourself...

I think you need around 3" of lift to clear highsteer without doing a bunch of work. If I was in your place I'd probably get some ome rear springs and install em up front.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Buy highsteer. Install. Add junkyard leaf springs untill you are happy. Realize that body lifts are :rainbow: without a reason. Remove. Feel good about yourself...

I think you need around 3" of lift to clear highsteer without doing a bunch of work. If I was in your place I'd probably get some ome rear springs and install em up front.
The way I look at it body lifts have a purpose (I didn't do it for looks).
Bigger tires give you more ground clearance for your axles and chassis.
Suspension lifts give you more suspension travel and more ground clearance for your chassis.
Body lifts give you clearance for your bigger tires without having to cut the fenders or limit upwards suspension travel. And they provide a lower center of gravity vs all suspension lift.

What I don't understand is what front suspension lift has to do with high steer if you don't want to limit your upwards axle travel. It seems like the lift wouldn't help unless you limit your upward axle travel. Bottomed out is bottomed out, right?

I'm not opposed to doing RUF springs as long as I don't have to relocate the spring perches. But I'm concerned it will make the job more complicated. The springs themselves seem pretty easy but it seems more likely that I would have to extend my front drive line.

My welding skills are minimal at best and I'd be doing any welding with a trail welder so I'm trying to minimize the amount of welding.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
The most crucial part of hy-steer is proper positioning of the box. I recommend going to an aftermarket pitman arm to get the position dialed in. Try to get the box as far forward as possible, especially with RUF and big rubber
So, is it reasonable to expect that I'll be able install high steer using a flat pitman arm without modifications to the other components as long as I make sure to position the steering box properly?
 

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I don't really think flat pitman is best, but yes.
You still need the frame reinforcement plates etc.
A drop hanger can make the fitments a little easier.
 

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Discussion Starter #11 (Edited)
I don't really think flat pitman is best, but yes.
You still need the frame reinforcement plates etc.
A drop hanger can make the fitments a little easier.
What pitman arm would you recommend for my application?
And do you have a recommendation on frame reinforcement plates?
I'm trying to avoid welding on a drop hanger if I can avoid it.
I haven't purchased anything yet but I'm trying to make sure I purchase the correct stuff for my application.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
By the way, if I have 5" of clearance between my stock bump stops and the frame, about how much lift do I have? Asked another way, what is the clearance between the rubber bump stop and the frame on a stock truck?
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Discussion Starter #13
So I've spent a few hours reading various threads with conflicting information and looking a fuzzy photobucket pictures. Here's the conclusions I've come to:

Parts I'll need to round up:

1) 4WD IFS Poweer Steering Steering Box. I saw a comment that someone thought a Landcruiser steering box would work better - Anyone know about this?

2) High Steer kit. I'll probably go for something with FJ80 tie rod ends.

3) Flat pitman arm with taper for FJ80 tie rod ends.

4) Steering Box Mounting Bracket.

Approach:

Mount steering box as far forward as possible with the sector shaft near vertical. Leave about 1/4" of clearance between the pitman arm drag link tie rod nut and the frame. With luck this will allow me to not have to use extended bump stops or notch the frame. Those will be last resort options if have interference problems with the frame or oil pan.

Do I pretty much have it?

Thanks
 

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Get a steering box from a 3rd gen pickup or 2nd gen 4runner. They have a tighter ratio.
Low range off road sells the frame plating for the box. I like the plating that goes from the front all the way to the firewall. It's better for when you mount shock hoops.
Also you will need to drill and weld sleeves into the frame for the new mounting holes.

I did hysteer on my 85 pickup as my senior project in high school almost 20 years ago. You souls be able to do this without issue
 

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flat pitman arm is best for most up travel

mount thesteering box so the castle nut on the drag link end at the pitman arm just clears the frame through its swing/travel, this will give you the best clearance for up travel, and notch the cab/body/front grill near the body mount so you can move the box as far forward as you can

the other benefit of the flat pitman arm is it allows you to rotate the box down so you dont have to cut as much into the body
 

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flat pitman arm is best for most up travel

mount thesteering box so the castle nut on the drag link end at the pitman arm just clears the frame through its swing/travel, this will give you the best clearance for up travel, and notch the cab/body/front grill near the body mount so you can move the box as far forward as you can
this needs to be added to the rufs faq tech thread or whatever it is called...
that little bit of tech will save a lot of fubar steering for the newbie fab guy.
 

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this needs to be added to the rufs faq tech thread or whatever it is called...
that little bit of tech will save a lot of fubar steering for the newbie fab guy.
i thought it was :confused: it's at least in the FAQ isn't is?
 

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As I recall (dimly) no...
I recall shove it as far forward as possible, nuthin about rock it up so it clears the tie rod...
 
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