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Any updates on those that have done this?

I'm considering something similar, converting a pair of 2" x 14 Fox piggy back reservoir coilovers (to tight for fixed reservoir) just don't know if its worth it?? I don't know if I need new top caps or if I can re-use cans or what. Need to make some calls tomorrow
 

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I just finished this a couple of weeks ago .... after starting the process over a month ago :shaking:.

I have learned some things and I hope this can help you avoid the same mistakes. (costly in $ and time)


Basically the process is as easy as suggested by the pros that contributed to this thread. Yes. But how you execute it can fawk things up.

Two things I did wrong:
1.

I messed up one piston O-ring by test fitting it in the shock body and not smearing oil on these components first.
After I cleaned everything and assembled the piston back together (I took it apart to clean and measure the shim thickness) I tried to slide the piston assembly into the can and the lack of lubrication (I think ) caused the main seal on the piston to get snagged and it jammed so it took a considerable force to pull it out of the shock again - ruining the seal.

2.
This was much worse.

I had the "remote resi" top caps available with my new hardware.
i noticed a small difference in how the hole for the hose was profiled.

On the "emulsion" cap the hole was drilled straight through the shock to simply house the shrader valve with a perfectly flat surface around the valve.

On the remote resi cap that hole was profiled in a semi spherical shape - seemingly to allow non-turbulent oil flow from the hose.
This made me decide to swap them from my shock bodies.


DO USE HEAT (like Pig suggested) to remove the top cap from the shock body. I tried to avoid it and wrestled with the shock body a lot and inadvertently I distorted the inner surface of the can as at one point I garbed it with a pipe wrench :)homer:). DO NOT DO THAT!!!

I ended up needing to order another shock body (from Poly - of course) and that is where time and money was wasted.


Use heat - again.

Originally I bought these shocks used from someone so I had no clue what valving they had.

I found after I opened them up it was .012 rebound and .008 compression.

I was kinda surprised to see these numbers. So when I had to order the new shock body I took the opportunity to order a .10 shim stacks I then used for my rebound instead of the old .12.

All said and done after I took the rig for a couple of runs I noticed a solid difference in how it rides. It certainly is not as "harsh" as it was.

But I cannot tell which one of the 3 changes are responsible for the improvement:

1. New oil ?
2. New rebound valving?
3. Remote resi design?


...or... probably -all of the above.
Either way: I'm happy I did it.
 

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Oh one more "close call" I had.

When I was setting up the IFP depth I looked at the diagram kinda wrong and set it up from the wrong end, creating a situation where the resi was going to be 80 percent oil/ 20 percent NO2.
Fortunately I caught it in time and switched the depth before it caused frustration.


When I was finally doing my second shock I felt like everything was such a breeze, though.:D
 
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