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Anybody try cryogenic treating? A local outfit advertises it for "racing parts", and I've got a front d44 that keeps exploding (ya, big surprise, right?). I know how it works in theory, but theory isn't there helping me change carriers.
 

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there's something to it - george and jason paulie have stuff on there rig done - and it seems to hold up well- Jess
 

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I was looking into this a couple of years ago for Dana 300 output shafts. Not too expensive for small parts, but obviously goes up with bigger parts.

I never did it, but I was told 5-10% increase in strength. Not much, but every little bit helps!
 

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onetoncv said:
there's something to it - george and jason paulie have stuff on there rig done - and it seems to hold up well- Jess
They also have 300m parts so breakage isn't likely. When I ran a 44 I had a few stubs treated and a good friend had some 30 spline 60 stubs treated. We both broke them just like normal. Seeemingly NO strength increase. The breaks did look different than untreated parts. I believe it makes a good difference for wearing items and the actual process is extremely important.
 

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onetoncv said:
when you say dana 300 its just a matter of time-:D - did you guys get the atlas in jaffer? Jess :D
Yes, Jess. All is well. I'm sorry I gave you cause for concern.
The mill, TH350 and Atlas is hanging together, suspended inbetween my frame rails ... ready for motor and TC mounts.
And thanks so much for your concern over my problem the other day.
:beer: :beer: :beer:
Like everyone sez, your customer service is first rate!
 

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It can make a a big difference in wear parts like bearing surfaces, cylinders, rings, blades, drill bits and such but tortional strength is not as effected by treating it. Cryo won't make crapy steel good it will only make good steel better because it effects the carbon in the steel so if you have low carbon steel then you get nothing but if you have some good heat treated steel it will make a big difference as far as wear goes.
 

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onetoncv said:
there's something to it - george and jason paulie have stuff on there rig done - and it seems to hold up well- Jess

Jess

How exactly do they go about doing this...I work in the cryogenics field in the US NAVY and have ready access to large amounts of Liq. Nitrogen or Oxygen (think N2 would be better) for this, but anyway..I'd do this on some of my new parts for axles and stuff it I knew how to do it and knew it would help out.

Thanks,
David
www.CornfedSuspension.com
 

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Aggro said:


They also have 300m parts so breakage isn't likely. When I ran a 44 I had a few stubs treated and a good friend had some 30 spline 60 stubs treated. We both broke them just like normal. Seeemingly NO strength increase. The breaks did look different than untreated parts. I believe it makes a good difference for wearing items and the actual process is extremely important.

Are you sure your 300m wasn't already heat treated?

i could be wrong though
 

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66CJdean said:
It can make a a big difference in wear parts like bearing surfaces, cylinders, rings, blades, drill bits and such but tortional strength is not as effected by treating it. Cryo won't make crapy steel good it will only make good steel better because it effects the carbon in the steel so if you have low carbon steel then you get nothing but if you have some good heat treated steel it will make a big difference as far as wear goes.
For the most part this is what I have read and come to the conclusion of. However, I heard it argued both ways......
 

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Cryo, like all treating processes is dependant upon two factors, Hardness, which is primarily governed by carbon content, and hardenability, which is governed by alloying elements. Hardenability is measured by a jamony (sp?) quench test, and is a measure of the ability to obtain martinsite in depth from the surface. For a basic understanding of what cryo will do, get a phase diagram an non-equilibrium cooling chart for the steel you are looking at, and see what microstructures will form. then compare rockwell hardness of results.
 
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