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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Here's the deal... I have an Onan L634T (same as a Cummins 6A3.4T). It is not a dodge-cummins engine... it's an old UPS truck engine. It's going into a Land Cruiser.

I am attempting to install the "rear main seal wear sleeve". A steel band that goes on the tail end of the crank. There is pretty much no way to do this, without having the Cummins Service tool "Oil and Wear Sleeve Driver", part #3823420.

This tool is discontinued.

I brought the motor to Cummins West, they said they could do it. Now they say they don't have the tool.

Does anyone out there work on these motors? Maybe an older UPS mechanic (they stopped using these engines ten years ago).

any help would be appreciated.
 

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Is this the speedy sleeve thing you install to get a new wear surface on the crank for the rear main seal to ride on?
 

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See if you can find a Stewart Stevenson nearby. They can service any diesel engine you can throw at them. My next choice would be a RV service facility or possibly a tractor repair center.

look and find out what other applications used the motor such as skid loaders, forklifts or generators and then go to one of their mechanics.
 

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gifu said:
I am attempting to install the "rear main seal wear sleeve". A steel band that goes on the tail end of the crank. There is pretty much no way to do this, without having the Cummins Service tool "Oil and Wear Sleeve Driver", part #3823420.

This tool is discontinued.
You said "band", but I'm assuming you mean "tube" or "sleeve", i.e. a short piece of very thinwall tubing, to provide a new seal-rubbing area on the crank.

If that's the case, then you should be able to make your own driving-tool out of a piece of thicker-wall tubing with an ID just a thou bigger than the crank diameter at that point.

But since that's not likely to be easy to find, you'd get a piece with an ID the next size smaller than the crank and bore it out on a lathe so that the ID is, again, just .001-.002 larger than the current seal-area dia. Then use that to drive it on.

Sometimes you need to turn down the OD as well, to fit through a gap, and maybe also provide a bevel at the nose and smooth it.

It's helpful to make the length of the ID bore equal to the distance you need to drive the sleeve on. That way you don't have to worry about going too far, or not far enough. You just drive quickly until the tool bottoms-out, and the sleeve will be in the right place.

If the sleeve has a lot of interference-fit, you'll sometimes need a 2nd tool to support the sleeve for starting it on. This one's easily made out of bar or pipe with an OD just greater than the sleeve OD. You turn the OD down to just slip inside the sleeve (i.e. same as crank dia)...for about half the length of the sleeve. In other words, so that the tool slips halfway inside the sleeve.

Use this "pilot" tool to make the first "drive", to get the sleeve halfway on; then use the other tool to finish the drive.

These tools shouldn't be much more than $100-$150 of work at your local lathe-guy.

I've never done the Cummins you're talking about, but I've put sleeves on various heavy-equipment shafts, t-case yokes, etc..

It's a very good idea to use "heat-n-chill" to make it slip on easily. These thin sleeves do not take well to heavy pounding... <grin>

Chill the crank (i.e. do it early in the morning), and heat the sleeve in your oven on broil (500+ deg). In the summer, we've used cold well-water run over the crank-end for a couple hours to chill it. We've also used those comp-air "vortex" chilers, but it EATS compressed air, and you gotta run it for a while to chill the crank at all...

You could heat the sleeve with a torch instead, but it's tough to heat it evenly to avoid warping....while it's all too easy to overheat a spot and lose the heat-treat. 500F in an oven won't bother the heat-treat.

When you drive it on, a 4x4 usually works better than a hammer. It's a lot easier to keep the force "in line", and you get a pretty good inertia "whack" with a 2-3' 4x4....

This is one of those jobs you want to do quickly if possible,
cuz as soon as you have intimate contact, the crank will quickly chill the sleeve back down; preventing further movement. whups...

Carefully drive it that first bit, just to make sure it's going on properly. Then whack it and get it on there.

If this sounds too jackpine-savage, then follow plan-A in the above posts instead....i.e., find a shop with the tool...grin...


This method has been my experience anyway....if someone's got a better/easier way to make a tool and/or install these things, I'm all ears...

ps; if the crank is out of the engine, check into having it flame-sprayed to restore the original dia.; rather than sleeving it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
thanks for all the help guys... great advice d9d. my next step was to go to a friend's machine shop and make a tool as you suggested.

BUT, Cummins West finally did find the tool, in Fresno. They sent it over to the san leandro site, and had it done this morning.

now, on to the conversion.
 
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