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I just bought an M103A3 trailer (basically just a 10ft flatbed version of the popular M105 military trailer). I want to turn this into an enclosed trailer, so I took some measurements and this is what I've come up with. But I've never built an enclosed trailer before, and I don't have any idea what type of materials I should be using. Not trying to build a rollcage, but it needs to be able to survive the bumps and scrapes you'd expect to encounter when taking a trailer places it wasn't meant to go. I'm going to be towing this trailer behind an M109 that I'm converting into a motorhome, and it will be going off-road.

The plan is to mount it to the deck using the stake pockets, so I can remove the enclosure (using my towbar A-frame hoist). Then I'll have a flatbed trailer and a shed. This is something that I'll probably only do when I'm setting up camp somewhere for an extended period of time, or when I have a specific need for a flatbed trailer, but I like the idea of having the option.



The red tubing is 2 x 2" x .120-wall.
The yellow tubing is 1 x 2" x .120-wall.
The blue tubing is 1 x 2" x .090-wall.
The pink tubing is 1.25" round x .120-wall (fits into a slot at the front of the trailer deck)

SolidWorks tells me that this combination of tubing should weigh about 623lbs. Plus, it's going to have a small door on the front right side for easy access, as well as a fold-down rear door / ramp.

I haven't decided what type of assist-mechanism I'm going to use on the rear door, but I'm leaning towards something like a torsion-type garage door spring. I do know that I want to be able to lock the door into position when it's horizontal, so I can use it as an extension of the trailer deck.

What do you guys think? I'd like to get some input on the overall design and materials before I start cutting and welding anything.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Figured I'd get at least a few, "Needs more triangulation" comments...
 

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Jesse, take your ideas and Solidworks over to this Board and post it up.
You'll get a lot of help with from guys who know trailer conversion and building over there.

http://www.mikenchell.com/forums/viewforum.php?f=5&sid=7c97ff9e9abf676f77cc4fe250a4c1a1

I hang out a lot with the Cargo Trailer Conversion Group as I'm about to convert my Cargo Trailer into a Toy Hauler.

I had that same idea for my flatbed motorcycle trailer until my 17 foot Cargo Trailer dropped in my lap. You may be over building it. Many years ago I worked in the Mobile homes/ campers industry and I assure you they are not built with that much material.
 

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Thats a lot stronger and heavier than it needs to be. For starters, you could use angle instead of box for the majority of it. Angle is half the weight of course, a little easier to work with, and box really isnt THAT much stronger in a situation like this. Also think about pieces there that arent really going to be doing anything, the red one running down the center of the roof line for example, that can go. The yellow roof supports could handle many hundreds of pounds.

I think your triangulation is definitely good enough. I have a haulmark and a local brand trailer in my yard and they have little to no triangulation at all. Once its skinned it'll be good.
 

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There isn't much need for triangulation since the sheeting holds the walls square, just like a house. You only need vertical studs and the sheet will make it solid. If you have ever raised some walls you will understand the concept.
 
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