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Nobody has mentioned method yet, so I'll throw this out for ya'll.

The Red Neck Tounge Weight Method.

Get a milk crate or a box to set your bathroom scale on. (mainly to get the scale at about the height of you trailer ball) Set the unloaded trailer tounge on the scale and find out what the trailer tounge weight is at the ball coupler. (that is minus the trail rig) (I need to add that if you have a tounge jack to lower the weight on the scales softly, it will help the SO feel better about you using her good scale to weigh a damn trailer. )
Now remember, if you have a box at the front of your trailer for tie down storage and other equipment, they're weight is gonna make a difference. the jacks, gas cans, tool boxes and other stuff you normally carry with you in that box, should be on the trailer. Don't forget your tie downs will not be in that box when the rig is tied downed. And if you use chains!!!! Well, they're a lot heavier, right? So take them off the trailer for the empty weight. But leave the tools and other stuff you normally carry on there.
Next go to your tow rig and take a ruler and measure the distance from your trailer hitch to the ground.
Now comes the math: Since Budda didn't get past the 3 rd grade the cyphering will be easy.
Let's say you want a tounge weight of 300 lbs.
Subtract the empty trailer tounge weight from 300.
OK?
Let say your empty trailer tounge has a weight of 50 lbs (not mine, I assure you) at the hitch point. Subtract the 50 from 300 and you get 250lbs! (Duh) Now set the scale on the ground and find a friend who weighs 250 lbs. OR what ever weight you need.

Once you find the right guy, or close enough, have him stand on the tip of you trailer tounge or draw bar of your tow rig with the empty trailer attached and measure the distance to the ground again at the same point of the drawbar. Now you know how much deflection your going to get from you tow vehicles springs with 300 lbs on the drawbar. Or close enough for this excersize.
Next, hook up your trailer and load it with what ever you plan on towing. Be it a Rock Crawler, Snow Mobiles or your Tractor and Brush Hog. (Remember, this is the Bubba Method) :)
This next part is real easy if your towing a load with tires on it.
Roll your load forward on the trailer while you lean a yard stick next to the trailer hitch. When it hits your predetermined loaded measurement then stop and tie it down. That should be 300 lbs or damn close to it. ( I suggest you mark the floor once you have THE spot, so you can hit it close everytime.)
'
OK: so what if you pack a bunch of junk in the back of your tow rig to go camping while your out. That will alter your hitch height right? We won't get into the physics of overload spring rates and all that junk, we'll just keep this simple. Just keep that in the back of you mind if you start getting ridiculus.
Solution: Subtract the empty trailer measurement from the trailer loaded measurement and remember that #.
Let's say there was 4 inches of deflection with 300 lbs tounge weight.
Next time your ready to load up your rock crawler, lean a yard stick against the back of the tow rig hitch and note the measurement. Put your crawler on the trailer until it drops 4 inches(or what ever you cyphered). Just remember to stop everyone from throwing stuff in the back of the tow rig while your loading your trailer. If it sways while towing with a 300 LB tounge weight the go to 350lbs. Whatever it tows best at. Then do the measurement again and find out how much the spring sag is and remember that #.
Then all you have to do is remember not to break the yardstick or use it for kindiling in the campfire.

Damn, it's is easier to explain in person. All this writing has giving me a hand cramp.

Hope this helps!
(Edit note: Typos are a real pain when your sick.)
SSSRodeo
 

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be careful vincent! we had a trailer loaded with mega tongue weight moving once when i was a kid, i started swaying on top of the huge bridge that goes by padres/chargers stadium and eventually jack knifed. i still remember the look on my dads face as it started to shimmy(booger weldz posting on borrowed computer)...be careful vincent!
 

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The savest thing for you & everone on the road would be to get a bigger tow rig! Good luck stoping real in a hurry. Hope I dont see you in the hills anywere.:eek:
 

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Hey Vince, that looks pretty scary to me, trailer and tow rig
look too small. The biggest rig should NOT be on the trailer.
You may even get pulled over for it.
Have you thought about a dolly-thingy that only the front wheels
drive on, with the back wheels on the ground ?
Much safer with most weight on the ground. Of course you
would disconnect the rear drive shaft for the trip.
U-Haul has those for people who tow their car across country
behind a big uhaul truck.
 

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85 rocrnr said:
The savest thing for you & everone on the road would be to get a bigger tow rig! Good luck stoping real in a hurry. Hope I dont see you in the hills anywere.:eek:
As long as the trailer brakes are working they stop fine, my budd it for years!!!:D
 

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Discussion Starter #27
the durango pulls just fine all new breaks on the trailer i moveed the weight and went for a ride to aubern and it did good 60mph and got to 70mph just to see how it would do.its a big load but i think it will be ok.i am haveing it weighed today so i can get it in the right place.
 

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My dad has a 99 Dakota Sport 4x4 with the V8 - similar setup to that Durango I suppose...

Towing with it is "ok" at best, but always feels light to me (Then again, I tow with a 2000 crew cab F250 ;) )

That Durango is pretty heavy, so you should be ok as far as the tail wanting to wag the dog...
 

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I used a tape measure and parked my truck and trailer on a flat area. Measuring the front edge of the trailer then pulling the Toy on till the front edge was an inch lower than without the Toy. tows awsome this way just the right amount of tongue weight. My tow rig is an 88 K5 Blazer. Marked that spot on the deck and loads perfect every time.
 

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We weigh all our junk at the local sand quarry late at nite after they close. Their scales are always on. Check around
 
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