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how do people get away with running single triangulated 4 links? ive only built a couple 4/5 link suspensions so im not very familiar with them, in theory i would think a single triangulated 4 link would still work with one of the straight links removed like a 4 link with track bar still works when you remove one of the upper links making it a 3 link with track bar. like i said though i dont really know squat about link suspensions :laughing:
Single triangulated 4 links work because for the axle to move sideways it still would need to stretch one upper while shrinking the other. Same reason a double triangulated 4 link works. Single or double the sideways loads are turned into extension and compression loads on the links.

OP: your idea will not work...and stop calling it a "double triangulated 3 link" because it is not. Go make a scale model if you can't wrap your head around why it will not work. long story short your axle will move sideways. The angled upper is no different that a straight upper other than it will make your pinion roll much more that a straight one would as the axle is falling out from under your truck
 

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Single triangulated 4 links work because for the axle to move sideways it still would need to stretch one upper while shrinking the other. Same reason a double triangulated 4 link works. Single or double the sideways loads are turned into extension and compression loads on the links.
i knew there was a reason why no one was building triangulated 3 links :laughing: :homer:
 

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this CAN work if the 'single' link is stretched from the far side of the chassis all the way to the opposite far side of the axle(I.E., a more extreme angle than the other two links, causing a bind in lateral movement) - it just won't work too well, a lot of axle steer.
 

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this CAN work if the 'single' link is stretched from the far side of the chassis all the way to the opposite far side of the axle(I.E., a more extreme angle than the other two links, causing a bind in lateral movement) - it just won't work too well, a lot of axle steer.
nope it wont.
 

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this CAN work if the 'single' link is stretched from the far side of the chassis all the way to the opposite far side of the axle(I.E., a more extreme angle than the other two links, causing a bind in lateral movement) - it just won't work too well, a lot of axle steer.
Soooo......a heavily canted Panhard bar that also tries to absorb axle wrap? I don't think so Tim... :shaking:
 

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It requires exactly (no more and no less) 4 links to restrain the other 4 degrees of freedom.
And what about a parallel 4 link with a panhard? :flipoff2: yes, yes, we're talking about triangulated. But, with the original question full of such wonderlust. Why not add an unrelated setup

this CAN work if the 'single' link is stretched from the far side of the chassis all the way to the opposite far side of the axle(I.E., a more extreme angle than the other two links, causing a bind in lateral movement) - it just won't work too well, a lot of axle steer.
Oh..shit... He's from Ohio :( Think about this a little more. And reread Bush65's post
 

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And what about a parallel 4 link with a panhard? :flipoff2: yes, yes, we're talking about triangulated. But, with the original question full of such wonderlust. Why not ad an unrelated setup
bushings add freedom.
 

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a single diagonal link is used in a lot of ladder bar drag cars for rear axle lateral location - it works. like i said, in this use, it just won't work well.
 

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a single diagonal link is used in a lot of ladder bar drag cars for rear axle lateral location - it works. like i said, in this use, it just won't work well.
A ladder bar is a radius arm. It acts as more than one link.
 

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Texas TWO link :flipoff2:





Very well put post though Bush65. :beer:
Thanks. I don't know what a Texas TWO link is, but I'll hazard a guess, from you response, that it has some type of suspension arms that provide more than one restraint, compared to a link, which in kinematics can only resist axial load and not resist moments (rotational forces) at the connections.

And what about a parallel 4 link with a panhard? :flipoff2: yes, yes, we're talking about triangulated. But, with the original question full of such wonderlust. Why not add an unrelated setup

A panhard is needed with a parallel four link system to provide acceptable lateral restraint. However because there are five links (the panhard is a link after all) the suspension is over constrained and will bind unless there is some flex in the joints.

Oh..shit... He's from Ohio :( Think about this a little more. And reread Bush65's post
 

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A ladder bar is a radius arm. It acts as more than one link.
...it's also been used in parallel 4-links as well, though it's not suggested due to the high loads the single-diagonal experiences.

point being, geometrically, a single diagonal can laterally locate a link suspension by it self, so long as its angle doesn't match the angle of another link. and, of course, the greater the difference in angle, the more effective the link will be. but, like i mentioned before, although 'theoretically' capable of performing the job, and even doing so in a few VERY specific examples, it's just not very effective which of course is why its so rarely seen.
 

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...it's also been used in parallel 4-links as well, though it's not suggested due to the high loads the single-diagonal experiences.

point being, geometrically, a single diagonal can laterally locate a link suspension by it self, so long as its angle doesn't match the angle of another link. and, of course, the greater the difference in angle, the more effective the link will be. but, like i mentioned before, although 'theoretically' capable of performing the job, and even doing so in a few VERY specific examples, it's just not very effective which of course is why its so rarely seen.
In all of your examples the diagonal link is serving only the purpose of locating the axle laterally. It is doing nothing to prevent the axle from rotating. In this application it is doing both and it won't work. There's not enough links. When you step on the gas the pinion will roll toward the ground and the axle will move to one side. When you step on the brake the pinion will roll up and the axle will move to the other side. Assuming this is a front axle
 

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...it's also been used in parallel 4-links as well, though it's not suggested due to the high loads the single-diagonal experiences.

point being, geometrically, a single diagonal can laterally locate a link suspension by it self, so long as its angle doesn't match the angle of another link. and, of course, the greater the difference in angle, the more effective the link will be. but, like i mentioned before, although 'theoretically' capable of performing the job, and even doing so in a few VERY specific examples, it's just not very effective which of course is why its so rarely seen.
Parallel 4 link still uses a panhard to locate axle laterally. Just like a 3 link or a radius arm set up. Without the panhard non of these work.
 

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...it's also been used in parallel 4-links as well, though it's not suggested due to the high loads the single-diagonal experiences.

point being, geometrically, a single diagonal can laterally locate a link suspension by it self, so long as its angle doesn't match the angle of another link. and, of course, the greater the difference in angle, the more effective the link will be. but, like i mentioned before, although 'theoretically' capable of performing the job, and even doing so in a few VERY specific examples, it's just not very effective which of course is why its so rarely seen.
stop posting and start thinking
 

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This pic is a Land Rover prototype suspension from the late 60's.

It is essentially a parallel 3 link, 2 lower & 1 upper link, but with 4th triangulated link for lateral control instead of a conventional panhard.

I presume they used the triangulated link instead of a panhard for packaging reasons, because the fuel tank was behind and too close to the rear axle.

 

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is this at all related to the setup the OP was proposing?
that has 4 links, we all know that will work
 
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