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he cut the aluminum block off parts himself, made me a pair too. I have no clue what he started with but I'd guess less than $5 worth of aluminum.
Exactly... 4" of aluminum.
Most expensive part was buying a new bushing so I can measure the OD. I thought about returning it.

All my panels vibrate like crazy not sure if it is the missing balance shaft or just ridged mounts, or both.


OK, so the Engine blocks are not exactly same. But close enough for me.


On another note.
I'm currently plumbing dual P/S pumps.
Aftermarket T/C pump bracket in the old A/C location and a stock style pump off the cam shaft.
**Note not all cams have the hex to run the p/s pump. I had mine machined and pressed in a hex, there is a GM part number for it.
I was originally going to run a MSD distributor in place of the pump. The hex press fit wasn't heavy enough for the pump (wrench test) so over the weekend I had to pull out the cam shaft and welded it in.
Plumbing should be done this week.
Would have been easier to just buy a used cam.
I'll let you know how it works after my next race.

Hopefully I will be able to steer fast enough.
Now even if I throw a belt only thing that will stop me is an eventual dead battery, since the water pump is timing chain driven.
 

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All my panels vibrate like crazy not sure if it is the missing balance shaft or just ridged mounts, or both.
Mine viberates at certain rpms too, not so bad after it's warmed up. I just thought that was the nature of a poly mounted 4 banger. My 22re wasn't much better in the vibration department with similar mounts. I've got mine turned up to 7500rpms and it's a beast when it's screaming.
 

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The countershafts balance secondary harmonic vibrations inherent in all inline 4 cylinders. So if you've deleted them it's no different than running the normal I4's of yesteryears that we are mostly used to. Maybe these engines being able to wind so much higher makes those vibrations more pronounced at higher rpms? Per wikipedia:

"For in-line 4's there are 3 types of crankshaft. No counter weights, fully counter weighted (FCW) and semi-counter or half-counter weighted (SCW/HCW). Cranks without counter weights ("bent sticks") were used on in-line 4's up to the mid 1930s for auto-mobiles but are still to be found in agricultural use with attendant problems.[7] Without counter weights an in-line 4 crank is balanced for primary forces, primary and secondary couples but not for secondary forces. Secondary force out balance can not be balanced on the crank, requiring 2 contra-rotating balance shafts running at twice engine speed. These will only be fitted on premium quality cars that demand very smooth running or on large engines in excess of 2.4L where the level of secondary vibration becomes obtrusive."

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Engine_balance#Four_cylinder_engines
 

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Oil coolor port flow direction

I've run into a problem in this area on a 2.4 that I have in a sandrail. Apparently I have and oil cooler model that someone epoxied the holes shut. Now oil is seeping out of them. While trying clean off the surface to attempt another layer of epoxy I opened a hole into the passage on the right hole. Now I'm concerned about metal getting into the system. It seems from your pictures that the oil is circulating from the right to the left ports when the cooler is in place. And without it both ports are exposed to the dirty side of the filter. True? If so I expect any debris to remain in the filter then.

Looking into getting some Belzona 1212 epoxy to make the repair.



The smaller hole toward the outside of the block tapped and plugged just fine. The one on the inside where the sleeve came from didn't. I don't recall what the closest NPT tap size was but it was huge and the hole wasn't anywhere close to the correct bore size to tap it. The tap wouldn't go in without drilling the hole and the correct drill bit size was like 267/328ths or something stupid like that with nothing even close on either side that was standard. The correct drill was not available locally. I said fuck it, I'm welding it:



But then I started working on a custom intake manifold that I knew I was going to need and the oil filter housing was all up in the way of every posisble combination that worked for me. So then I said fuck THAT, I'm cutting it off. I jerry-rigged this ghetto-fucked air system to blow compressed air out the crank case and both oil passages at the same time to prevent shavings from going down the engine and cut the entire damn thing off with a sawzall.







Then I welded -10 an fittings to the holes.



The small hole furthest back is just a drain back port to the crank case to drain the oil in the filter housing so that filter changes don't get all messy. So it just got welded shut. I'll run a remote oil filter now. The ghetto air system worked well but I had to stop cutting probably about 8 times to allow my compressor to recharge.
 

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I've run into a problem in this area on a 2.4 that I have in a sandrail. Apparently I have and oil cooler model that someone epoxied the holes shut. Now oil is seeping out of them. While trying clean off the surface to attempt another layer of epoxy I opened a hole into the passage on the right hole. Now I'm concerned about metal getting into the system. It seems from your pictures that the oil is circulating from the right to the left ports when the cooler is in place. And without it both ports are exposed to the dirty side of the filter. True? If so I expect any debris to remain in the filter then.

Looking into getting some Belzona 1212 epoxy to make the repair.
Man, I'm sorry, but that was over four years ago and I haven't touched that project since then. I don't recall well enough to answer your question.
 

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Man, I'm sorry, but that was over four years ago and I haven't touched that project since then. I don't recall well enough to answer your question.
No problem, and thanks for the quick reply.
I think I answered my own question, Took out the filter and both holes are open to the filter cavity.

And I am assuming the oil flows from O.D. to I.D. on the element.

It's funny, ever since I swapped the 2.4 into the buggy I've found myself on Pirate more often than not for engine info. I've been a long time lurker with my FJ40 4x4 that isn't quite as hardcore as this bunch :)
 

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In case anyone is interested, I took my 2.2L out of a 2008 Cobalt and turbo charged it. And bolted it to a 4L60E. Did my own tuning with HP tuners. Running about 5.5psi of boost. it's nice having the little extra power. I have it in my custom built buggy on 39" reds (2 seater). Runs awesome. I'm still tweaking the tune when I go to altitude. But it's always improving.

There is a lot that went into the motor/trans combo. I can list a few important topics.

Turbo: I started with a pretty large turbo. Turbo lag was killing me. I have since gone to a smaller turbo, but it's still not quite small enough. I would suggest if anyone is going to put a turbo on their 2.2L, go figure out what size is on the 2.0L motors and get one just slightly larger than that. Will help a LOT with turbo lag. I haven't done that yet.

Injectors: I had to go to 60# injectors as the stock 45# injectors were running out of fuel over 4,000rpm.

Intake/WasteGate: I went to ZZPerformance for their intake manifold. It's working REALLY well for me. I originally bought a chinese waste gate. HUGE mistake. It leaked and wouldn't open when it was supposed to. It was allowing boost to go to nearly 15psi when it had a spring for 6psi! YIKES. I went with a Tial and it works great! You get what you pay for here. Turbos are the same....you get what you pay for.

Tuning: I purchased HP Tuners and a wideband sensor. I tuned in lambda and learned how to do it from GoatRope Garage on YouTube as well as hitting up some of my buddies who have tuned turbos before. Eventually I figured it out....although I am still a novice, but getting better.

Engine to Trans Adapting: I have a local shop build me a stock 4L60E but had them install a converter for a Camaro V6 because I wanted a higher stall torque that came with it. To do this he had to change the pump input shaft to the one that matches the V6 converter. It is different than the ones that go with the v8 converters! To adapt the engine to trans bell housing, I went to Fodrill motorsports and had them build me an adapter plate out of aluminum. Mating the converter to the flex plate was a challenge. There was about a 1" gap between the converter mounting feet and the flexplate. There is a company that makes an adapter plate that bolts to the crank end with longer bolts and has a plate that matches the converter. If I had it to do over again, I woudl probably do this rather than what I did. But so far, mine is holding up. I made some round, spacers (about 0.9 inches long) out of steel and bored an offset hole in them (made 3 of them). This allowed me to match them well to the torque converter "feet" and had them tigged to the converter feet. I also made an alignment piece that slipped over the snout of the converter and went into the hole in the end of the crank to insure the converter was well centered. I also slightly slotted the flex plate holes where the converter bolts and was able to bolt it all together (3 bolts) with some high strength bolts. It seems to be working well, for now...and I've wound it up to 6k a few times. So far so good. BTW: I would recommend getting a converter that has a stall torque somewhere in the 2300-2500 rpm range. The stock Camaro V6 converter that I used is like 1600rpm. So the engine can't get to building boost when stall torqued which lags the launch-ability. I have yet to try the higher stall torque converter, but I plan to. Will be a while before I get one. But if/when I do, I will report back here.

Engine harness: I purchased an engine harness from swapspecialties.com. Some people had a lot of bad stuff to say about them, but they were the ONLY one I could find that wasn't asking a shit ton of money for one. I think I paid like $650 for it. I did have one issue with it. The 6 wires that went to the throttle body were pinned incorrectly. After about an hour of ohm'ing out the harness between the computer and the TB, I was able to figure out where they were supposed to go. Easily popped out the pins and moved the wires around, and she fired right up! Other than that, the price was right, the customer service was excellent, and they shipped it within the timeframe they said they would (about 3-4 weeks from date of ordering). I would use them again. I think what happened is that this is supposed to be a more generic harness for ecotec motors. And my harness also had connectors for motors with exhaust camshaft timing (where it is different than the intake side). So I suspect they had pinned it for that newer motor, not realizing I had the older motor. Whatever the case, I figure it out pretty quickly and was able to move forward. Engine trouble codes helped point me directly to the throttle body wiring being the issue.

Trans tuning: I went with Painless Wiring's new trans computer controller they came out with for the 4L60E and 4L80E transmissions. It has worked FLAWLESSLY for me! And I love the manual shifting I can get with it. Go check it out if you want to make is super simple to run an E version trans with an engine that never went together! Here is a link to it on their website as it isn't easy to find on their site:
https://www.painlessperformance.com/wc/66501

Engine cooling: When you try to bolt the engine to a rear wheel drive transmission, you will find that you can't use the stock coolant connection at the block. There are a few companies that sell a different coolant connections to the block that allows it clear the transmission bell housing. BUT! It removes the thermostat. I attempted to use an inline thermostat in the hoses that I put together but was getting issues with it boiling over. After some research I discovered that the ecotec cooling system is designed to NEVER be dead headed (like old Chevy's would do). It's designed to always be slightly bypassing the thermostat. And the setup is designed that the pump PULLS from the thermostat side. So as the heat goes up, if you put a thermostat in line and don't allow some bypass flow to happen, the vacuum it pulls along with the heat causes the fluid to "boil" way sooner than it would normally. I ended up having to remove the thermostat and I have never had a problem since. I use the engine computer to control my engine cooling fan to come on and off. It gets up to 200, fan comes on, it cools, and then fan goes off. So this acts sort of like my thermostat but with a little more swing in temps than a thermostat would have done.

I'm definitely leaving out some things, but maybe this will help someone get started. PM me if someone needs more details.
 

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I have been dealing with inconsistent cooling from the beginning of this build.
When you bolt an adapter to the Ecotec you are forced to change the thermostat housing.
I chose to bolt the CBM housing to the motor and this housing deletes the thermostat all together.
CMB says they have sold thousands of them and nobody has temp issues, but I find that hard to believe on any engine without a thermostat.
So what did I do I added an external thermostat. It helped and worked ok, but would get some spikes in temp until the system was fully up to temp then the spikes were not as noticeable.
I tried different thermostats, along with drilling different size and number of holes in them. Some made it better, some worse.
Bleeding the air out of the system was always a pain in the ass ans would take hours/days at time to get it all out.
I have searched mady different boards and others all having the same issue.

I finally did a proof of concept on an option and will work on machining a housing to incorporate the changes.

I took the CMB block off and machined a bypass slot in the block to allow the engine to internally bypass as originally designed.




Then I removed and bored the hose location to accept an screw together inline thermostat housing, then took a light cut on the housing for a press fit into the block.


Now a thermostat will reside near the original location and the original engine bypass works again.


I'm using a 180 deg thermostat with 1x 1/8" hole in it.
I cracked the top turbo cooling line loose and then filled the system.There was very little bleeding to have to do and it worked perfect.

The engine ran all day @195deg with no spikes like before.
 
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