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Discussion Starter #1
I´m swapping into my Samurai a 1.6 16V motor from a Swift. This engine is placed transversly in the Swift, hence a few significant difficulties arise when mounting it longitudinally.

The water oultet on this engine is located on what is now the rear of the engine, just below the distributor. As such, it was necessary to modify the water outlet housing in order to clear the firewall. However, now there is no room for the thermostat. So I´m planning to make an external in-line thermostat housing and locate it about 3" from the original location.

The FSM for this engine calles for a thermostat which starts to open at 82*C (179* F) and is fully open at 95*C (203* F). My question is if I should alter the thermostat spec to a lower range due to the fact that it will be located further away from the engine block, thus theoretically allowing the water to become hotter before opening.

I haven´t even started looking for a thermostat with a lower temp range. But since I´ll be building the housing from scratch, I could use a thermostat from virtually any car, so I shouldn´t run into trouble finding something suitable.

Should I be concerned with this or am I being anal??:p

TIA
 

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I think you can insulate the exterior of the hose up to, and just past, the external thermostat using refrigeration type black foam tube insulation and vinyl black tape. I'm not talking about that the cheezy gray colored stuff used for water pipe sold at home improvement stores. Also, do not use the cheap PVC black eletrical tape as it does not have the high end heat ranges needed to keep the insulation on the hose, use vinyl.
Heat management through insulated pipes is common in industry semiconductor applications and also in vehicle steam engine applications.
 

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I think as long as the tempature sending unit is in it's original
position on the engine you should be able to moniter the
situation and make any needed adjustments with different
rated thermastats.In other words,don't worry about it.
 

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i had to mount one inline before and i used a small block chevy aftermarket O-ring thermostat housing and i bolted it to a non O-ring chevy thermostat housing and i put the v8 thermostat thermostat inbetween with the corresponding flow direction in mind ..and then i drilled a steam hole in the thermostat plate to allow the air through so it will burp itself and then i took a bracket off the head to mount it to which conducted heat...worked swell




:flipoff2:
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I think that drilling a hole in the thermostat plate might be the best thing to get heat transfer to the thermostat itself. My concern is the lag time for heat transfer in stationary water between when the block is at temp and the thermostat "sees" this temp.

Thanks!!!
 

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Interesting dilema. Don't forget that the efficiency of your cooling system will decrease with a cooler thermostat, and could result in overheating. Shouldn't matter much as long as you don't go too low though. I like the idea of drilling a small bypass orifice in the thermostat to minimze the false reading from cooler "dead" water. This would help the "remote" thermostat get a better flow of the water as the engine is warming up. I don't think it will matter near as much once you get the engine warmed up and get through a few thermostat cycles, since as soon as the thermo senses 170* water it will start to open, get some flow, and then sense (probably) hotter water from the engine and open up rapidly.
 

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Might want to build the housing for whatever appears to be the most common thermostat around. That way, if you have one fail on you, it is easier to find a replacement.
 
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