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In SE Washington the Fall snow is usually soft, we call it sugar snow among other names, in the spring it's the winter pack to wheel on which has totally different characteristics. Have you guys found that a different tire works better in the Fall snow? I have IROK's and am super impressed with how they work in the spring stuff, and they work fine for the powder/sugar snow but I'm not sure an aggressive tire is the best.
Thought? opinions? MTR's? KM2's? Go home and go back to bed? :D
 

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Not a specific tire per se, just bigger tires, reduced drag and deep gearing. Watched a rig on portals and 49's literally run away from a similar rig on one tons and 49's. Sugar snow is just a bitch, period. It des not take much drag or wheel spin to stop all movement.
 

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My old style MTR's worked well in the snow you describe. I would look into one of the new tires with a similar tread pattern. Something like the Nitto Trail Grappler and Toyo Open Country MT

(I've also seen the MTR Kevlar's do well in dry snow.)
 

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I run 38.5x11 boggers aired way down around 2psi and do well in most snow and really good in some, but they will dig fast and you have to use gearing and not let them spin or your done. deep soft snow is just hard, need tall tires and unimogs like said above. I'm yet to see wide boggers work well, I have seen them do bad many times, all the guys I know that had them sold them and went to Iroks or mtr style tires. I really want the new 42.5x13.5 boggers for this coming winter!
 

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Unless you have big horsepower and the proper gearing, boggers suck in the snow.
why would anybody need hp in the snow? seems like the more throttle i use in snow the more i dig. so i use as little as possible. :D
 

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It depends on the snow, sometimes the only way to get through is momentum.
mkay well. i hope too see something like that. this winter is my hope once shes done.

mite be able to get that front a little more low with some work on the oil pan



if i may ask what are some of your belly heights on your locog snow builds?
 

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Closed knuckle 60/70?
Its a 70. Now that I am a bit more educated axle wise . im lookn for a d60 king pin. I thought I did good getting a 70. It is likly to become a rear steer axle.
 

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Belly height is important, if it drags it will slow you down and hang you up. I think I'm around 25" with my 36's. I lifted it a couple inches when I did 63's and RUF's and it made a huge difference in getting through and out of the deep snow. Sometimes I seem to end up driving in the ditch.:D
 

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why would anybody need hp in the snow? seems like the more throttle i use in snow the more i dig. so i use as little as possible. :D
look at all the guys up in canada. big HP and big tires. there's no replacement for displacement, momentum is your friend for sure
 

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Over here in the Gifford Pintchot around southwest Wa the snow is almost never dry and the more gas you give to more you get stuck. One of the guys that does the best has a 4 banger 10:1 twinstick and 40s aired down at 2psi and can crawl stuff than others cant make it more than 10ft by hitting it hard. I if I hit it hard with the boggers I will have to be pulled out every time but if I keep the Rs down and just let the tires walk I can go on 6+ feet of snow. They almost always put me out front to beak trail and thats with sometimes up 12 well built rigs in one outing. But are boggers the best, not always, but they shine once in a while :)
 

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Over here in the Gifford Pintchot around southwest Wa the snow is almost never dry and the more gas you give to more you get stuck. One of the guys that does the best has a 4 banger 10:1 twinstick and 40s aired down at 2psi and can crawl stuff than others cant make it more than 10ft by hitting it hard. I if I hit it hard with the boggers I will have to be pulled out every time but if I keep the Rs down and just let the tires walk I can go on 6+ feet of snow. They almost always put me out front to beak trail and thats with sometimes up 12 well built rigs in one outing. But are boggers the best, not always, but they shine once in a while :)
How do they do side hilling? Not trying to be negative, but theres better options out there. in the end, we're all just out to have fun ... and make it farther than our buddies :D
 

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They can suck on a side hill :) The wide ones really suck bad on side hills. I think with the weight of my grand cherokee and the tires being so skinny helps, plus I grooved them a bunch. I had a friend in a locked front and rear cj7 with 39.5 boggers aired down and I could idle past him when he wasn't making it. When its time for new tires I'm not sure what I will get though, maybe iroks or something. I just have fun seeing what my rig can do and than build it even better! When money allows that is.
 

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How do they do side hilling? Not trying to be negative, but theres better options out there. in the end, we're all just out to have fun ... and make it farther than our buddies :D
Yep, this sums it up for us. Our day is how far can you make it in 2wd, then how far can you go before you air down. No trophies just bragging rights until the next trip.

I think there is a balance between hp, gears and tires, I had a 429 C6 combo that just wanted to spin 36"s no matter what you did, crazy low end power.
I need to be able to idle through stuff, and slowing pick it up with no spin. Like a big electric motor, smooth power transition to the redline.
 

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I stick to my guns when I say LIGHT is good in the snow. I also theoretically have a pretty neutral suspension (3 link and 4 link calculator). My thought is a neutral suspension may dig less when starting forward motion and might help the "float effect".

How about weight distribution? Lighter front end to keep it from sinking down and packs the way for the rear end. I don't know, but seems like a good idea, kinda like a powder ski with a fat tip to keep from going under.

My belly clearance is 17" and I built the motor skid like a snow shoe, but the front axles is what pushes all of the snow, so belly height might kind of be irrelevant until you start to dig down with no forward movement.
 
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