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Toy Axles
-Gears
What combo(s) work?
-Steering
Where do i start....
-Swap Information
Pad Info
-Spring
What works
S/R or Regular...
-Links

You get the idea...

Let have all the FAQ info y'all are saven up to post here. Judging by the lack of info in the stock zuke axle thread everyone is running other stuff, so this topic should be pretty comprehensive.
 

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This is cut and paste from my site. Most of the info is stil good, some of the prices may be obsolete. I know now that everyone has discovered the Toy axles, their prices have been climbing so the swap isn't as economical as it used to be unless you are patient and hunt down a good deal on the axles. Here's my take:

A lot of the information I am going to present here comes from scouring the various message boards on the internet. Toyota axle swaps have been done many times before so I am not breaking new ground. Also these are not the only suitable axles for swapping under a Zuk, certain year Wagoner's have full width Dana 44's with the proper offset diff for the Zuk drive train. I won't go into hybrids or custom axles because the sky is the limit there. Based on my reading here's some of the reasons why I chose the Toyota axles:

1. Cost. You can pick up 80-85 Toy axles for as low as $100 each. The later the year, the better the front housing is gusseted from the factory.

2. Aftermarket support. Limited slip, locker, ARB, or spools are readily available for the 8" Toyota rear end as well as a wide selection of ring and pinion ratios.

3. Removable third member. Just like the Samurai. This makes it real easy to install gears/lockers. Also the pinion flanges can easily be re-drilled to accept the Samurai drive shaft hole pattern and vice versa.

4. Brakes use the same threaded fittings.

5. Flat top knuckles. With the stock knuckles you can easily make or buy a steering setup that puts the tie rod and drag link above the springs. Note: to run a hi-steer setup you need to move your steering box forward. To run a standard cross over setup you can leave the steering box in the stock location.

6. While still being a lot heavier than the stock Samurai axles, these axles do weigh less that the Dana 44's and the pumpkin is smaller.

7. Strong axles. Based on data I have found on the internet ( one source here: http://performanceunlimited.com/illustrations/frontaxles.html), the Toyota axles are 30 spline with the smallest diameter (weakest point) being approx. 1.24". A front Dana 44 axle's smallest diameter is 1.128", most of them are also 30 spline. For the front the Dana 44 swap has an advantage because the Toyota front axle uses a birfield joint (though much larger than the Samurai birfield). So if you want 38"+ tires the Dana 44 swap will be a better way to go in the long run. My goal is 35" tires so I believe the Toyota axles will be perfect when combined with the light weight of the Samurai.

8. Axle width. From what I have read the Toyota axles are 5" wider than the stock Samurai axles. How wide is good is a debate that will never end. In many cases wider is better but in just as many cases your may be forced to take a very difficult line because you cannot fit thru an opening. I am pretty happy with my Zuks stance as it is so based on my calculations I will be 1.5" wider than I am now using common 3.75: backspaced rims and the Toyota axles. Here's some additional axle width imformation I found on the web:

Stock Toyota front axle measurements for comparison:
55.5" wide, 29" spring perch centers, '79-85 Toyota trucks and 4runners
63.5" wide, (set up for coil springs) 90-97 FJ80 and FZJ80 Landcruisers
'86-95 IFS front end is about 58.5" wide
'93-98 T100 IFS front end is about 65" wide

Toyota Rear Axle Widths:
55" wide, '79-85 trucks/4runners
58" wide, '86-95 trucks/4runners
60.75" wide, '95.5-up Tacomas/4runners
66.75" wide, '93-98 T100 trucks

The last thing I'll touch on is cost. While this is a relatively easy swap, there are still a lot of costs that tend to add up quicker than planned. I'll outline my costs below and update them as I go. My target price for the swap was about $1500, I already see I will exceed that. Here's the breakdown on what I have spent so far and remember you can find better deals the longer you look, I have given myself a month to complete the swap:

Front axles from an 85 Toyota - $250

ARB - $575

5.29 R&P - $180

R&P Install Kit - $125

Warn Hubs - $130

Rear axle from an 85 Toyota - $250

Spool - $200

5.29 R&P - $180

R&P Install Kit - $125

Diff Guards - $17 (8" Weld on Pipe Cap)

Hy-steer Steering Arms/Pitman Arm/Tie Rod/Drag Link - $550

Misc bearings and oil seals - $60

Rotors/Brake Pads - $75

Brake Lines + Tools - $40

6 Lug Toyota Wheels w/ 3" backspacing - $281

Install of Gears & Lockers $299

Longer U-Bolts for Front $44


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Update 8-20-02 - Stuff I learned

It's been almost a year since I installed my Toyota axles and there were a few things I learned along the way that should be on the first page of this write up.

1. You need to outboard your front springs to match the Toyota spring perch spacing. I was told you could just bolt the front axle up, you can but it'll eat spring bushings pretty quickly not to mention the springs get a slight outward bow in them.

2. You can't rotate the front spring perches. I think part of the reason my turning radius is less than desirable is my caster angles are messed up. The stock Toyota spring eyes in front are nearly on the same plane with each other. Keep this in mind when setting up your shackle/spring mounts. You really can't get good caster with a shackle reverse like mine is setup and using a shackle that hangs down even lower only makes it worse. The only solution is to cut and turn the knuckles. The way mine is setup is useable, but the turning radius could be better.

3. Shave your differentials. Not only do you get a little more ground clearance but more importantly you get rid of the drain plug which eventually gets ground down to nothing. Here's a good link to some info on how this is done.

4. 5.29 gears have held up well.

5. Toy axles under a Zuk with the stock 1.3 can easily handle 37" tires. If needed superbirfs are a cheap way to beef up the front end, Allpro sells upgraded rear axles.
 

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One more thing - You will have to cut off and put new spring pads on the Toy rear axle, for the spring pad spacing is different I believe.
 

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zukipuke said:
thanks for posting your wealth of info. I hate to pilfer crap with permision...

ill get stuff moved it over this weekend


:)

-yag

No problem, you can put a link to it as well - Toyota axle swap. so they can see the pictures as well. I am going thru the pages and cleaning up some of the stuff I missed.
 

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Azrckcrawler said:
2. You can't rotate the front spring perches. I think part of the reason my turning radius is less than desirable is my caster angles are messed up. The stock Toyota spring eyes in front are nearly on the same plane with each other. Keep this in mind when setting up your shackle/spring mounts. You really can't get good caster with a shackle reverse like mine is setup and using a shackle that hangs down even lower only makes it worse. The only solution is to cut and turn the knuckles. The way mine is setup is useable, but the turning radius could be better.
[/B]

Actually, you can turn the perches, but you have to turn the knuckles while you're at it.

Details Here
 

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ECF said:
Just for pricing details I got two sets of 5.29 precision ring and pinions and install kits shipped from Randy's Ring and Pinion to my house for $260, which is the best deal I have heard of. Also 4wheels parts can sell you an arb for 550 if you tell them that is what Shaffer's offroad is selling them for. I also got the high steer from Trailtoy for 190 for both arms and $85 for the tapped dom tie rod and drag link with brand new chevy tie rod ends. I'm just posting this cause some of you might want good prices and this the best I can come up with. Hope this helps some of you bargain hunters. I paid $200 for my 85 front end complete with good breaks but cut brake lines. I paid about 50 bucks for an 85 rear end complete minus ebrake crap. Both had stock 4.10's Also wondering why you would bother replacing the aisin hubs for warns when the aisin hubs are awesome!
Those are some good prices. All the axles in the yards were stripped of hubs, otherwise I wouldn't have wasted the money.
 

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extended brake hose

extended brake hoses that fit sami hard lines for the front axle:

23" in long, 10mm female fitting both ends.

NAPA part # 38688 (that is posted everwhere)

New info - The NAPA # references the following:

AC Delco 18032404
Bendix 78351
CarQuest SP9960
Rabestos BH38688
Wagner F120870

With those numbers - you should be able to order/ find the hoses anywhere.
 

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I searched everywhere and never found out how to do the rear brake lines. I took out the "T" on the Toyota axle that both hard lines go into. Then my extended Zuk soft lines bolted right up.
 

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Inner long axle 41" 17.5#
Inner short akle 12.5#
3rd member 47#
stock tie rod 10#
BARE FRONT TOY HOUSING 50#
 

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I am swapping a Toy drive shaft from the front of an 85 extra cab into the rear of the Suzuki. The Suzuki is an 88.5 samurai with the LARGE FLANGES.

The Toy drive shaft is a CV type drive shaft.
Fully compressed it is the same length as the Suzuki rear d-shaft (+-0.25-inch)
Fully extended it is approximately 2-inches longer than the Suzuki d-shaft fully extended.

I started mixing and matching parts and decided it was worth the under taking since I had the d-shaft lying in the garage and several spare third members to use for spares in case everything went bad.

The first thing I noticed was the centering flange on the Toy d-shaft was larger than the hole in the center of the Suzuki flange.

I very carefully grinded the Toy centering flange to get the approximate inside diameter.
The next problem shortly arrived. Once the centering flange fit, I realized that the pinion/pinion nut protruded too far out from the Suzuki flange to fit inside the Toy flange.
I ground some off of the pinion nut and realized it was a futile effort.
 

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You can see where the pinion hits the inside of the Toy flange on the d-shaft.

I thought about clearanceing this, but decided it would probably weaken it. Therefore I needed a spacer.
 

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I decided to build a spacer. I took ¼-aluminum plate and cut a 1.75-inch hole with a hole saw in the plate. Then I placed the Toy centering flange into the hole and cut out the Toy flange pattern.

Here's a pic of the spacer and the flange already drilled.

I built the spacer with the center hole, and the toy centering flange protrudes through the spacer enoung to center the d-shaft on the pinion flange.
 

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The next problem is centering the spacer and d-shaft flange onto the pinion flange to drill the pattern.

I drilled the spacer first.
Clamped it to the d-shaft and drilled it with no problems.

The pinion flange I took a similar approach.
I ended up placing the toy centering flange into the Suzuki center and shimming it up so it was spaced evenly all the way around.
Using metal scraps, vice grips, a C-clamp, and a ruler that reads to the 1/16-inch.

I drilled the pinion flange through the bolt holes on the d-shaft.
I checked all the holes difference from the center, and the edge after drilling and they all checked within a 1/16-inch.

Here's a pic to show how I drilled it (this ghetto fab jig was set up later just for the pic, but that's how I did it)
 

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I drilled the t-case flange while it was still in the vehicle.
This was much harder and the fact that it was dark, I was planning on wheeling the next day, and it was starting to rain made the job more difficult.

I measured and punched the flange. I checked the mesaurements and it was good. After drilling pilot holes I checked them and I was about a 1/16-inch off on one hole and it was obvious the the d-shaft wouldn't bolt up.

I tried correcting this when I open the holes up but the end result was still about 1/16-inch off.

I put the driveshaft in and tried it. It vibrated like it was coming apart. It was obvious that the vibration was coming from the t-case end.

Looks like I'm going to be buying a Rockrat adapter.

Edited with final results:(6-23-03)
I ordered a rockrat t-case adapter it arrived promptly (must have passed in the mail - Thanks Rockrat)
These adapters only come for the small flange (pre 88.5) suzuki pattern. I took a small flange d-shaft flange and vice gripped it to the t-case flange, drilled it and installed the adapter. The whole thing took under an hour (I already had the pinion flange drilled).

I installed the toy drive shaft and it works great. No vibrations what so ever. My stock rear shaft with a spacer had some vibration, this has none.

ADDED INFO I used the 1-3/4" spacer that was in the rear and installed it on my front t-case flange and stock front d-shaft.
This adjusts perfectly for installing rear springs in the front using the stock holes on the rear spring hanger.

Everything seems to be working great. I'll keep you posted if problems arise later.
 

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I used an 85 4 runner front shaft for my rear shaft. I got it shortened by :I think: 7 inches. It bolted right up to the rear pinoin and a Rockrat adapter at the tcase solved the rear driveline. For the front, I bolted the stock Zuk one to the tcase, and drilled holes in the Toyota front pinoin flange. The center lined up perfect and all. Done.
 
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