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Discussion Starter #22
WOW, it´s looking NICE.
Yes, what I did what jalbrecht42 described, stretched behind the fenders.
Can you show a pic of the front driveshaft/TH350 pan clearance, now that is everything bolted ??
Here is what I got for driveshaft/TH350 clearance pics. This is not my final setup. The driveshaft in these pictures is a 2.5", I will be running a 2" but it needs to be lengthened. This one happened to be close enough for mock-up purposes. I will probably drop the rear of the drive train a couple more degrees. Its hard to see in these pics but it is really close to missing the bottom of the pan completely and I think a few degrees would get it. Might need to clock the D300 too. Remember that my adaptor sets the D300 really flat.

This pic is of the RIGHT side front wheel up



This one is of the LEFT side front up and the 2.5" shaft is touching the pan.


 

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Master Tinkerer
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get a 2-pc driveshaft with a carrier bearing. Then you'll never have to worry about it hitting anything. Costs a little more but piece of mind is worth it!
 

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Discussion Starter #26
Radiator install. To save space I decided to get a radiator with the trans cooler built in. Griffin makes this one and it fits between the headlight buckets too. To size the radiator I used the tried and true 1 square inch per cubic inch. I have a 305ci engine and the core of this radiator measures 18x20 giving me 360 sq inches. Just in case a bigger motor is in its future. This one is designed to fit in a sprint car and I think they are limited to 355ci. One thing i don't understand about alumuminum aftermarket radiators...why the hell don't they have drain cocks? Stupid...





Located my new crossmember so that I could sit the radiator on it and still shut the hood. in this picture the engine is set 3 inches to the left. I ended up having other issues with steering and exhaust so it is now 1.5 inches to the left. The radiator is perfectly centered in this picture.



Had some aluminum channel that the radiator fit in perfectly.



Made this top bracket so that I could easily remove the radiator. You can also see how the radiator fits between the headlight buckets.



and notched the aluminum channel so that the entire core was exposed

 

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Discussion Starter #28
are you isolating the radiator at all?
ya...I have rubber between the aluminum channel and the weld seam between the tanks and core, 4 total. Also decided to only put 1 bolt from the risers to the top mount. Hopefully this allows the frame to rack and not load up the radiator.
 

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Discussion Starter #29
The engine i'm using is my "spare" engine. It's been in 3 trucks and a car in its life, but its been sitting for 5 years. Now that i've got a radiator in it, I borrowed the carb and HEI from my Chevelle to fire it up and make sure it still runs.



Gas can sitting on the floor with a fuel line stuck in it, that's safe...right?


Fired right up and idled, but...holy lopy cam batman! I forgot I changed the cam, too many beers between then and now i guess? It barley idles and has only 11" of vacuum at 1000 RPM. Not going to work for the fuel injection or for trying to idle over anything. Damn...now I have to tear the motor apart. Something I wasn't planning on.

At this point I was a bit frustrated and decided to pull the body and finish up the frame. Check out my lift system. Ran a chain to a beam in the rafters and hoist the body up with a chain hoist. Works pretty good so one person can remove the body



I've already talked about the frame earlier so I won't get into that again, so...back to the motor. Did some research and talked to Brian at Harris Performance (www.tbichips.com). We came up with a comp 12-402-4 hydraulic flat tappit cam. its specs are Duration @ .050 212/218, lift .444/.444 and LSA of 114 degrees. Should purr like a kitten at 500 RPM and jive with the TBI fuel injection nicely. Added a new oil pump and timing set while I had it all apart too.



Old Cam


Added an aluminum intake i had, some fresh paint and chrome valve covers for a little bling.



Next will be installing the fuel injection and ignition.
 

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Discussion Starter #30
Getting close to where I'm currently at on this build. Next is TBI fuel injection wiring. Turned out to be quite a collection of parts that I can't believe worked together. Throttle body and distributer from a 91 Camaro with a 305ci engine, Computer from a 90 Chevy truck with a 4.3 V6 and a Painless GM TBI wiring harness. Had a chip burnt for the computer that was tuned for the cam and deleted stuff like EGR, lock-up converter, vehicle speed sensor (VSS), neutral safety, etc... Here it is all laid out on the floor. Plugged all the sensors in to make sure I had everything lined out.



Here are a bunch of pics of the install. Actually wasn't as bad as it seems, just really time consuming. The Painless harness was expensive but it sure made it easier. Plus the wiring and connectors are new, not 20 years old. Computer I'm using isn't water proof so I ran through the fire wall and installed it on the back side of the dash face. Plan to put it in tupperware or something like that.











 

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Discussion Starter #31
Ran fuel lines while i was wiring too. Same truck the computer came from donated its fuel lines. All the way from the throttle body to the tank. Was able to bend the steel lines by hand and with a little tubing bender to get them routed.






Used a Summit inline fuel pump and mounted it to the body on the back side of the riser panel.


Temporary gas can...haven't got my fuel cell yet.


Ok...fatal flaw on the route. I'm sure you noticed i'm running them on the outside of the frame. The reason is because I ran my exhaust tucked up on the inside and there is no room for the fuel lines now that the frame is boxed in. Seemed like a good idea at the time :confused:. You can see what i did in this pic.



This is a problem I don't have a good solution for yet. I'll have sliders along the body eventually that will tie to the frame. Think that will be enough protection? Should I extend my skid plate under the lines? Maybe I'm worrying about it too much? I can just see snaging a line on a rock and spraying pressurized fuel everywhere.
 

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Ford Bigot
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If you keep your external pump close to the tank and below the level of the tank you won't have any problems. I've had my E2000 that way for 2 years now.
 

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If you keep your external pump close to the tank and below the level of the tank you won't have any problems. I've had my E2000 that way for 2 years now.
LOL....its the E2000s I kept having hell with....I had it about 18" from the tank in my blazer, mounted lower than the tank so that it would siphon better, and still kept frying 'em. Glad to hear you had better luck than me. In my flatty, when I ran a fuel cell I just hose clamped my pump to the pickup hose inside it, and JB welded the hole where my power wires penetrated the cell. Pump was still easy to change since you could reach in through the large fill hole and pull it out for a quick change if need be. I never had one go out in it though.
 

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Cool project! I like how you're keeping the build simple and reliable. Kudos for researching the transfer case adapter, too. Anyone could give lots of cash to AA or Novak for an adapter, but a DIY solution is more rewarding.

For fuel line protection, what about covering them with pipe that has been split down the center? Maybe bend some small (1" or 1.5") exhaust pipe in the same shape as your fuel lines and cut the pipe in half down its length. Then, weld some tabs on and bolt it to the side of the frame.

At the least, I'd probably put the fuel filter somewhere else. That's a pretty big component to be hanging off the outside of the frame rail. (It looks like you're running a second filter on the gas can -- will that be there when you install the fuel cell?)

Keep up the good work!
 

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Discussion Starter #36
if you can, put the pump in your tank, I've always had hell with pumps quitting often when they are frame mounted. Maybe you'll have better luck.
In the tank would be sweet any pics? This one mounted to the body is LOUD! I'd imagine once I get mufflers on it, the wine will get anoying especially mounted directly under the driver.

Cool project! I like how you're keeping the build simple and reliable. Kudos for researching the transfer case adapter, too. Anyone could give lots of cash to AA or Novak for an adapter, but a DIY solution is more rewarding.
Thanks! Simple and reliable is the theme here. I don't like working on it when I'm suppose to be playing. Especially when I plan to drag it 12 hours to Ouray, CO this summer. I posted the stuff on the adaptor so someone else would hopefully use the idea. Have $220 in it and $210 of that was the shaft I had to buy from AA. Still better than $500. Everyone is trying to save a buck these days. :smokin:

For fuel line protection, what about covering them with pipe that has been split down the center? Maybe bend some small (1" or 1.5") exhaust pipe in the same shape as your fuel lines and cut the pipe in half down its length. Then, weld some tabs on and bolt it to the side of the frame.

At the least, I'd probably put the fuel filter somewhere else. That's a pretty big component to be hanging off the outside of the frame rail. (It looks like you're running a second filter on the gas can -- will that be there when you install the fuel cell?)

Keep up the good work!
Awesome idea on the fuel line protection! Think I'll do that. As for the fuel filter I used lines from a Chevy truck so I kinda had to use it or splice the lines. Stupid thing is huge isn't it? Might have to find what fitting that is and redo it. its past the pump anyway, and I have one before the pump. Really not needed unless the pump fails and sends junk down the line.
 

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Discussion Starter #37
Well that hits the highlights of the drive train. I'll have to revisit some things later, still need to regear the front axle and rebuild the outers, finalize drive shafts, etc...

Body work...the part i FAWKING HATE! OK...a little harsh, just not very good at it so don't like it. Started by getting seats so I could see how much I needed to notch the wheel house. These came from Summit, pretty cheap for what they are...$150 each shipped to my door. They are high quality "synthetic" leather:flipoff2: Have some cool feature though. They flip forward, recline and have the slider built in. Plus cutouts for the belts.



Placement was key for me since I'm 6'3". I didn't want to be looking over the windshild and I didn't want to have my knees in my chest, so I got some 2x4's and mocked them up.



I have the steering sorta installed but screwed it up in a couple different ways so I'll talk about it when I fix my screw ups. Should be pretty sweet setup when finished. Anyway, gave me an idea where the wheel should be. ya...it's wrong too. :mad3:



Wife even jumped in...she seems to fit better. Maybe I should make the passanger seat fit me :confused:



Based on my mockup session it turns out i need 5 inches out of the wheel house so I'm comfortable.



Also turned out that the rear mount holes on the seat track lined up perfectly with the riser panel...how lucky is that! Makes mounting easier. Unfortunately that is why I have to replace the floors. I removed the patch panel that was installed on the passanger side and look what I found.



Yep, that's the riser panel that I plan to mount the seats to and it is rusted in two! Not much left of the passanger floor either.



So...pulled all the wiring out and took the body off the frame (again) to replace the floors and fix the body. This is what I'm working on now.
 

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Ran fuel lines while i was wiring too. Same truck the computer came from donated its fuel lines. All the way from the throttle body to the tank. Was able to bend the steel lines by hand and with a little tubing bender to get them routed.






Used a Summit inline fuel pump and mounted it to the body on the back side of the riser panel.


Temporary gas can...haven't got my fuel cell yet.


Ok...fatal flaw on the route. I'm sure you noticed i'm running them on the outside of the frame. The reason is because I ran my exhaust tucked up on the inside and there is no room for the fuel lines now that the frame is boxed in. Seemed like a good idea at the time :confused:. You can see what i did in this pic.



This is a problem I don't have a good solution for yet. I'll have sliders along the body eventually that will tie to the frame. Think that will be enough protection? Should I extend my skid plate under the lines? Maybe I'm worrying about it too much? I can just see snaging a line on a rock and spraying pressurized fuel everywhere.
heres an idea i was thinkin about doing it on my yj run the lines thru the fire wall and tucked in beside the inside of the quarter panel just an idea
 

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Discussion Starter #40
heres an idea i was thinkin about doing it on my yj run the lines thru the fire wall and tucked in beside the inside of the quarter panel just an idea
Or...taking this idea and expanding on it. Run the fuel lines down the middle under and attached to the body above the trans and transfer case then 90 degree up and then 90 degree over into the fuel pump. This keeps the pump under the body for protection and noise. Only issue I see is it running near the drive shaft for 4-6 inches. thoughts?
 
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