Pirate 4x4 banner
1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hello, I’m new in the forum. I have a 1987 Samurai with a stock 1.3 L carburated engine. My Samurai was recently involved in a flood (car was parked and turned off) in which water reached above the hood. Water came into the engine cylinders and oil. I need tips from the community as to what to do before operating the vehicle again so I can minimize damage.

I removed the water from the cylinders by cranking the engine without the spark plugs (otherwise the water would have damaged the engine). I now will remove the valve cover since I saw water inside there and it doesn’t flow down. I will change the oil and filter. Should I do several oil changes after this or will it be fine with just one oil change? I also noticed that moving the ignition key was hard. Should I apply any lube there? The gear shift knob was also very hard. Haven’t tried the brake pedal yet. Should I lube those? Should I change the transmission/differential oil or other oils? How do I verify if oil got in there?

Also my mechanic said that I should remove the carburator and clean it. But my carb has never been removed and I’m pretty sure that the gaskets will break. I can’t buy replacement gaskets where I am. How could I clean the carb without removing it? It seems dry on the top now.

I have already dried the sparkplugs. Should I do anything else before attempting to restart the engine? I love my Sammy and I'm decided to get it going again. Thanks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
99 Posts
Change all the fluids. Axle, t-case,transmission. Engine oil, brake fluid,power steering fluid(if equipped).
Lube and grease brake pedal bushings,pivots etc. Same for clutch.steering linkages, tie rods, ball joints,etc etc , lube the spring eye bushings and shock bushings...lube that ignition.... And good luck.
Be ready to find all kinds of things to grease and lube. Door hinges for example...and electrical gremlins ...water and wiring...dont play well together .corrosion is a bitch.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
24 Posts
I'm not going to say that a flooded vehicle can never be made right again.. Because it can be done. It's just not Cheep or easy.

All your electrical wiring should be replaced. Water gets into the wires. Even between the wire and its rubber coating. All electrical connectors need to be replaced. They will corrode over time.

Anything made of material or foam or fiber should be cleaned, treated against mold or replaced.

All lines should be cleaned and flushed.

Anything holding a liquid should be cleaned and flushed. Like radiator, gas tank, brake fluid Reservoir and more.

And on and on and on and on.

For example the inside of the doors are now going to rust out from the inside, unless completely cleaned. This may go for all your body panels.

Fixing a flooded vehicle is so expensive and so on, that it is usually not done.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I'm not going to say that a flooded vehicle can never be made right again.. Because it can be done. It's just not Cheep or easy.

All your electrical wiring should be replaced. Water gets into the wires. Even between the wire and its rubber coating. All electrical connectors need to be replaced. They will corrode over time.

Anything made of material or foam or fiber should be cleaned, treated against mold or replaced.

All lines should be cleaned and flushed.

Anything holding a liquid should be cleaned and flushed. Like radiator, gas tank, brake fluid Reservoir and more.

And on and on and on and on.

For example the inside of the doors are now going to rust out from the inside, unless completely cleaned. This may go for all your body panels.

Fixing a flooded vehicle is so expensive and so on, that it is usually not done.
That's a good explaination for why some insurance companies write off flooded vehicles. Now what I don't understand is how do those guys who drive 4x4s with water up to their necks manage to do that without doing all this work every time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Change all the fluids. Axle, t-case,transmission. Engine oil, brake fluid,power steering fluid(if equipped).
Lube and grease brake pedal bushings,pivots etc. Same for clutch.steering linkages, tie rods, ball joints,etc etc , lube the spring eye bushings and shock bushings...lube that ignition.... And good luck.
Be ready to find all kinds of things to grease and lube. Door hinges for example...and electrical gremlins ...water and wiring...dont play well together .corrosion is a bitch.
Thanks I changed all the fluids except for brake fluid which I will do this week. Most of the fluids had water in them. I was able to start the car. The clutch didn't want to engage but I tried really hard and it engaged and seems to be somewhat OK now. My friend is a mechanic and told me to just drive it.

Someone told me I had to open the drain plug on the carburator. I didn't know there is one. It leaked water of course.

I should have replaced all the fluids before even cranking the engine without the sparkplugs. I cranked it without the sparkplugs to remove all the water from the cylinders but that also allowed the oil pump to circulate water through the system. Now I still have some water mixed with the oil even after replacing the oil. But it will evaporate I was told.

I also had water in the exhaust system. It was fuming vapour.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
99 Posts
I would change the oil again. Water doesnt evaporate that well out of oil...it froths into a brown milshake and wrecks crank bearings real good..ask me how i know .......
And...water wheeling requires prep work.. sealing everything best ad possible ..waterproof everything best as possible (my fusebox and ECU live in a siliconed tuperware)
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top