Pirate 4x4 banner

1 - 20 of 30 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,700 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
This may be a :homer: question, but here it goes:

Will 2019 Super Duty tire pressure monitors work with a 2011 Super Duty?

Backstory:

Needed new tires for my truck. It was much cheaper to buy a set of new takeoffs from some bro dozer than it was to buy new tires. Got a set of aluminum 18" wheels with Goodyear Wrangler A/T Kevlar whatever tires with less than 400 miles on them for $900. I want to bolt them on to my 2011 F250, but don't know anything about the tire pressure monitors and if I will have to swap them from my old wheels to the new ones. Anyone know?

Thank you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
127 Posts
IDK if they will work, but you can try the programming procedures to find out.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,052 Posts
I've just been driving around with the light on for over 100k miles.

Thought it would burn out eventually, but it's still going strong.

The light on the dash wasn't nearly as effective at alerting me as the chunks of rubber flying and what sounded like a shotgun as the tire distributed itself among the weeds.

So I decided they were pretty well useless as I actually check the tires and airbags and haven't ever bothered fixing that one.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,700 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
This truck has the screen in the instrument cluster and makes lots of annoying noises and flashes annoying visuals if one of the tires gets low. I am not going to drive around with that shit going on daily. I will break beads and swap sensors before dealing with that. I am really hoping there is a way to use the 2019 sensors though. I will look up the learn process and see if I can get it to work this weekend.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,038 Posts
This may be a :homer: question, but here it goes:
According to napa they are different. I knew they were on '16+ f150 trucks, so I looked at our parts program and they changed in 17 on the SD trucks also. Sorry, think they will not work. And, from what we learned on our f150 is that we cannot program them anymore like the older trucks. We either have to buy a new tpms tool or take them over to the ford store. good times, change is always a good thing!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,700 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
For some reason this doesn't work for Fords. I have had an inflated tire with a good sensor in my bed while my spare is on and it still throws a warning. It's like it knows if the wheel(s) are not spinning.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,610 Posts
Take the sensors off your current rims, put them all together is a small tank somehow and pressurize to 100 psi..... problem solved.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
According to napa they are different. I knew they were on '16+ f150 trucks, so I looked at our parts program and they changed in 17 on the SD trucks also. Sorry, think they will not work. And, from what we learned on our f150 is that we cannot program them anymore like the older trucks. We either have to buy a new tpms tool or take them over to the ford store. good times, change is always a good thing!
Part numbers may have changed (because of physical differences) but the signal that is transmitted may be the same. I remember being able to replace the banded sensors with valve stem sensors on 2010-2016-ish Fords. Same with GMs aluminum stem sensors with newer rubber stem sensors.

Worth a try if your truck does not need the TPMS tool and you can use the deflate method. Keep in mind the tire needs to deflate pretty low before the horn sounds during the learn process. If it does not honk, then all you lost is time and air pressure:D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,700 Posts
Discussion Starter #17
So I read the link provided above, but how do I know if I can do the honk method? The link was confusing.
 
1 - 20 of 30 Posts
Top