Pirate 4x4 banner
1 - 20 of 22 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,300 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Forest Service proposing seasonal closure on Deer Valley Trail for Yosemite Toad​

Comments due by December 3

By Jeff Blewett, CA4WDC Natural Resource Consultant

In the US Forest Service's current proposal for Deer Valley (in the Eldorado National Forest) they are calling for a Seasonal CLOSURE from January 1 to July 31, 2015 for the Yosemite Toad

We need to question why they need this seasonal closure until July 31st.

We support all of the maintenance work and trail reroutes needed to bring this trail into compliance, but question the Seasonal Closure until July 31.

What we need you to do:

1. Download the proposed plan so that you are familiar with the proposal.

2. Email your comments to [email protected] by December 3rd.

SOURCE
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,406 Posts
they are calling for a Seasonal CLOSURE from January 1 to July 31, 2015 for the Yosemite Toad

We need to question why they need this seasonal closure until July 31st.


That trail has been in existance for 150 years and they now feel it needs to be closed 7 months out of the year?:mad3:​
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,406 Posts
the links do not work to the proposed plan.

The Forest Service website had nothing about this listed.

who the hell is mrbrown?

comments are due on Dec 3? thats only 15 days, how long is this been out?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,300 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
the links do not work to the proposed plan.

The Forest Service website had nothing about this listed.

who the hell is mrbrown?

comments are due on Dec 3? thats only 15 days, how long is this been out?
I received it via subscibed e-mail notification from the source listed an hour prior to posting. Can't speak to the rest . . . did you get this far? The download link to the FS "deer-vally-proposed-plan-11-18-14.pdf" works for me.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,406 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,406 Posts
here is the propsed action


Deer Valley 4wd Meadow Restoration and Blue Lakes Road Maintenance Project
USDA Forest Service
Eldorado National Forest
Amador Ranger District
Alpine County, California

Background

The Amador Ranger District of the Eldorado National Forest proposes trail maintenance and meadow restoration on the Deer Valley 4wd trail and road maintenance on the Blue Lakes/Meadow Lakes road.

The proposed project area is located between the areas of Meadow Lake and Lower Blue Lake along Blue Lakes/Meadow Lake Road (9N01), Section 30, 25, and 26 T.9 N., R 18 E., M.D.B.&M. and along Deer Valley 4wd trail (19E01), Section 5, T.8 N., R 19 E., M.D.B.&M.

As a part of the Eldorado National Forest Travel Management SEIS, 18 routes were identified where corrective actions and further biological assessments were needed prior to opening the routes to public motor vehicle use. On June 26, 2014 a team of Forest Service Specialists visited Deer Valley 4wd trail to assess trail condition with respect to Standard and Guideline (SG) 100 and developed a preliminary proposal for corrective actions at the second crossing with Deer Creek (Meadow 9N83-2). During the site assessment it was determined that the trail was in fact currently meeting SG 100 with respect to hydrologic connectivity, but that some corrective actions could be taken to limit resource impacts within the meadow.

Meadow Lake Rd (9N01) was also reviewed by the team of Forest Service Specialists on June 26, 2014 for necessary corrective measures to bring the route into compliance with S&G 100. During the field review the team determined that standard road maintenance activities including installing rolling dips, cleaning out/upgrading undersized culverts, and regrading the road would address existing issues with hydrologic connectivity.


Purpose and Need for Action

The purpose and need for this project is to limit resource impacts associated with the existing Deer Valley 4wd trail at meadows 9N83-2 and 9N83-1 while also providing opportunities for high-country semiprimitive motorized vehicle use as described in the ENF LRMP 1989. Resource impacts identified in Deer Valley and Clover Valley Meadow include:

1) Active erosion of the western bank of Deer Creek which will likely impact the trail in its current alignment.
2) Impacts to riparian vegetation from the widening of the existing stream crossings.
3) Impacts to riparian vegetation from user created stream crossings on the west side of Deer Creek.
4) Sediment entering Deer Creek from both approaches to the stream crossing.
5) Potential impacts to Yosemite toad from public motor vehicles traveling on the Deer Valley 4wd Trail and the Meadow Lake road.

Additionally, the purpose and need for this project is to analyze and implement corrective actions
for the Meadow Lake Road (9N01) to comply with the portion of Standard and Guideline #100 of the 2004 Sierra Nevada Forest Plan Amendment that pertains to meadows.

Standard and Guideline 100 reads,

“Maintain and restore the hydrologic connectivity of streams, meadows, wetlands and other special aquatic features identifying roads and trails that intercept, divert or disrupt natural surface and subsurface water flow paths. Implement corrective actions where necessary to restore connectivity.”

This analysis is part of the implementation of the Record of Decision for the 2013 Eldorado National Forest Travel Management SEIS, which identified 18 routes where corrective actions were needed prior to adding the routes back onto the Eldorado National Forest Motor Vehicle Use Map (MVUM) as part of the system of routes designated for motor vehicle use.

Proposed Action:
Deer Valley 4wd trail: The proposed action would include corrective actions to reduce resource impacts associated with the Deer Valley Trail at meadows 9N83-2 and 9N83-1 and to limit potential impacts to Yosemite toad from public motor vehicle travel after the trail is reopened. Proposed action items include:

1) MVUM: Add Deer Valley 4wd trail (19E01) back to the MVUM. Adding the Deer Valley 4wd trail to MVUM is not contingent on the completion of the proposed corrective actions at Meadows 9N83-2 and 9N83-1 since evaluation has found the route to be consistent with Forest Plan Standard and Guideline 100.

2) Forest Order: A seasonal closure from January 1 to July 31st would be instituted for the portion of Deer Valley 4wd trail currently closed under the Travel Management SEIS to limit impacts to Yosemite toads from public motor vehicle use. Closure signs and maps would be places at trailheads, Clover Valley, and the southern portion of the trail at the Eldorado and Stanislaus National Forest boundary alerting the public of the seasonal closure.

3) Trail Reroute: A short reroute (< 500 feet) of 19E01 on the west side of Deer Creek would be completed in order to move the trail away from areas of active stream bank erosion while improving the angle of approach to the existing stream crossing. The new trail segment would be located approximately 100 feet west of the existing trail and would require the removal of approximately 20 trees (5 trees >20 inch DBH) and stumps to clear a new trail corridor. Material generated from construction of the reroute (wood chips and logs) would be used to block dispersed areas, define a new trail, and apply mulch to the old trail corridor. Mulch would be incorporated into the old roadbed using a rototiller and then planted with locally collected vegetation.

4) Hardening crossing at Meadow 9N83-2: Native rock and boulders from the trail or the Clover Valley sediment field would be imported to harden the approaches to Deer Creek
using large cobbles and rock between 8-16” diameter. The stream crossing would also be delineated with boulders to limit the width of the crossing at both sides of Deer Creek.

5) Stream Bank Restoration: The proposed project would restore stream banks in Deer Valley (9N83-2) and Clover Valley (9N83-1) meadow impacted by past off-trail vehicle travel using revegetation methods such as seeding, willow cuttings, and transplanting sod plugs.

Blue Lakes/Meadow Lake road: The proposed action for Blue Lakes/Meadow Lake Road consists of road maintenance activities to bring the road into compliance with S&G 100 while also limiting potential impacts to Yosemite toad from vehicle travel. Specific proposed action items include:

1) MVUM: Add Blue Lakes/Meadow Lake road (9N01) back to the MVUM after corrective actions have occurred to restore hydrologic connectivity.

2) Forest Order: A seasonal closure from January 1 to July 31 would be instituted for the portion of Blue Lakes/Meadow Lake road currently closed under the travel management SEIS to limit impacts to Yosemite toad from public motor vehicle use. Seasonal closure signs would be placed west of Twin Lake closing approximately the last mile of the route to public motor vehicles.

3) Road Maintenance: Maintenance activities would include maintaining/installing rolling dips, regrading the road, and clearing out/ upgrading undersized culverts. Blue Lakes/Meadow Lake road (9N01) will be added to the MVUM once necessary corrective measures have been completed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,300 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Fix it and Close It!!! :mad3:

The FSEIS substantially modified both need and purpose of the actions initially proposed in the DSEIS by giving consideration to riparian issues; the alternatives offered in the DSEIS did not reflect this dramatic difference.

Kathy Hardy and crew tossed the MYLF into the FSEIS but there was no mention of the Toad, now there's a proposed Toad closure and no mention of the Frog.

The only mention of riparian habitat in the final Court order was a requirement to include consideration of RCO #2 Standards and Guidelines #100 pertaining to meadows on the 42 routes.

Obviously the 42 Routes ROD/FSEIS appeal battle wasn't the grind it could have been for many reasons.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,843 Posts
I sent a nice email. Asking for more open time and a few other items. I can post my comments if you want to read them. But now is the time to make constructive comment on opening the trail earlier that Aug 1
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
493 Posts
From my records, the points of closure resulting from the SEIS containing meadows 1 and 2, essentially the entire valley, were not defined as critical habitat for both the SYLF and the Yosemite Toad. In fact, the critical habitat shapefile/layer I downloaded from the USFWS goes up to meadow 1 and then circumvents the entire Valley. What I'm saying is the USFWS did not recognize the entire valley as critical habitat, making:

2) Forest Order: A seasonal closure from January 1 to July 31st would be instituted for the portion of Deer Valley 4wd trail currently closed under the Travel Management SEIS to limit impacts to Yosemite toads from public motor vehicle use. Closure signs and maps would be places at trailheads, Clover Valley, and the southern portion of the trail at the Eldorado and Stanislaus National Forest boundary alerting the public of the seasonal closure.

Potentially, MOOT. I recognize the potential habitat requirement of the Endangered Species Act but I feel the Forest Service is trying too hard to appeal to Schambach by combining two entirely separate issues from one lawsuit. If its not critical habitat than why do we need seasonal closures, why are we getting distracted from the real issue at hand?

I'm trying to get the map uploaded.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
47 Posts
LYIN' KING, thank you for letting us know about the proposed actions.

1966Scout800, thank you for the details.


I just finished sending an email to Matt Brown expressing the following:

- Support for immediately re-opening the Deer Valley trail since it was found to be compliant with S&G 100.

- Support for performing maintenance on the Deer Valley trail to protect the environment and to ensure the trail stays open for the foreseeable future.

- Strongly questioning the proposed seasonal closure on the grounds that the original lawsuit was related to protecting meadows, and the meadows on Deer Valley were not found to be critical habitat for the Yosemite toad.

I also expressed strong support for maintaining and re-opening Blue Lakes Road and suggested that before a seasonal closure is put in place there needs to be more research done to determine if that area is a critical habitat for the toad, and if so to prove if the trail does in fact have an impact on that habitat.

I bcc'd several friends on this email and suggested they write their own.


Information on the project including the proposed actions:
Forest Service

Information on commenting on this project:
https://cara.ecosystem-management.org/Public//CommentInput?Project=45439

- Matt
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
627 Posts
I sent an e mail last night when I got a notification from cal4wd assn.
it's amazing that all the literature I've read on the decline of this toad, NOT ONCE has trail and vehicle use been attributed!! Further, the trail crosses the river at two points!! So they're implying that roughly 40 ft wife of area where the vehicles come in contact w/ the water will make a difference?!? LAME!!
Also, stated here and something that I wish I had thought of, is the fact that these are two entirely separate issues!!

Feel good, mamby pamby BS!!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
493 Posts
Is anyone else getting two maps, I can delete one but I wasnt sure if it was showing up for other users.

On another note; has there been a study done specifically addressing the issue of Toads at Deer Valley. If so, I would like to see it. If there hasn't been one than how is a seasonal closure justifiable in the absence of science? On good intentions only? :shaking:
 

·
flamethrower
Joined
·
12,606 Posts
https://www.fws.gov/sacramento/outr...n_Proposals/docs/YToad-nDPS_Facts_may2014.pdf

DISTRIBUTION
The Yosemite toad is found in wet meadows and forests, at elevations of 4,800 to 12,000 ft. Indigenous to California, they are found in a 150
mile span of the Sierra Nevada Mountains from Ebbetts Pass in Alpine County in the north to Fresno and northern Inyo Counties in the south.

Once abundant,this species has been in dramatic decline for several decades and is now found primarily on publicly managed lands at high elevations, including streams, lakes, ponds, and meadow habitats located within national forests and national parks.

THREATS
Studies show that the Yosemite toad has seen range wide declines
estimated at almost 50 percent. Threats include destruction, modification, and curtailment of the species’ habitat and range. Past land uses have altered meadow communities by permanently reducing habitat quantity and quality unless active and costly restoration is implemented.


Climate change is a current threat of high magnitude
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,406 Posts
DISTRIBUTION
The Yosemite toad is found in wet meadows and forests, at elevations of 4,800 to 12,000 ft. Indigenous to California, they are found in a 150
mile span of the Sierra Nevada Mountains from Ebbetts Pass in Alpine County in the north to Fresno and northern Inyo Counties in the south.
Not that they care, but the meadows on Deer valley are north of Ebbetts pass, not south.
 
1 - 20 of 22 Posts
Top